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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #46 
Even the folks at TED are talking about Cymatics - visualizing sound and then seeing that sound has an effect on matter probably at a cellular level

http://blog.ted.com/2009/09/03/making_sound_vi/

Science is just beginning to understand what some have been saying for centuries

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Kirya
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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #47 
This is a guy called Bashar (I don't know who he is) who thinks C# is pretty cool


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Kirya
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Ramesh

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Reply with quote  #48 
Namaskar Kiryaji,

Very informative links Sahibji!Thanks alot for sharing.

Here's another one i found similar to the topic.The article though insists on tuning in 432hz rather than 440.
http://suenaverdadero.blogspot.com.ar/2012/07/para-tener-en-cuenta-el-sonido-influye.html

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"If in every home one child was taught Hindustani classical music this country would never have been partitioned."-Bade Ghulam Ali Khan
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CheesecakeTomek

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Reply with quote  #49 
interesting post, i wish i understood spanish as I am sure I'm not getting the whole picture through Google translate. The general argument might have some merit, but I find some of his reasoning to be pretty flimsy if not flat out inaccurate. For instance, the idea that 432 Hz has more harmonics than 440, to the best of my knowledge, is a bit ridiculous. The harmonic spectrum (which overtones are present) of a sound is defined by its resonating body (metal, wood, flute, clarinet, vocal chords, shape of the mouth, etc.), while the frequency of the fundamental note merely defines the frequency value of those overtones. Thus the difference between notes played on a clarinet at 432 and 440 will be, obviously, the fundamental tone, and the frequencies of its overtones, which are directly related; but not which overtones are present. Now, general registers of the instrument may provide slightly different presence of overtones, but that is not pertinent here.

I am wondering what type of music they used to find themselves feeling fatigued, irritable, etc. These are usually due to poor compositional technique :wink: Fear and anxiety can be tricky effectively create and can actually be evidence of quite adept compositional technique! Ok, I'm being a tad silly here, but really, what did they listen to, and who listened?

I would not be surprised if DVDs support a higher bitrate than CDs, but only if the file format does as well!

Now, there very well may be some overall weight to the argument for 432 if the rest of his numbers are correct. Every object and space does have a resonating frequency. However, if we are all different shapes and sizes, then we each have our own resonant frequency. Furthermore, from my own experience in exploring some of these healing music ideas, I find that it is more the relationship between the notes one sings and the drone (so intervals) that creates a deep experience, rather than the actual frequencies of the notes being sung.

The most powerful music I have ever experienced was going to see Wasifuddin Dagar live. He sang Yaman, Darbari, and Miyan ki Malhar. The concert affected me deeply on a physical level, and I could still "feel" it well into the afternoon of the following day. He sang at a Sa slightly above C (in relation to A 440), so maybe A 432 made a few appearances, but certainly the music wasn't rooted in it. And I saw my teacher and a fellow student the next day and we were all still "feeling it" and we are all different shapes and sizes, so again, in my own experiences it is the intervals that have an effect more than the specific tuning.

If there is some weight to a resonating frequency being effectively felt, then that would explain why so many people in WCM have varying opinions- because they're all different, and thus have a different resonating frequency. Upon re-reading the article, it seems they are indeed talking about WCM, which I find to be an incredibly tricky topic and almost irrelevant when it comes to healing music.

Anyways, these are just some views and opinions that I have come upon over the years of casual consideration of this topic.
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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #50 
This is the FIXED version which is exactly 136.1 Hz (or C# in 432 Hz. C# in 432 Hz has a .04 Hz difference).



When I play my 440 based tuner while this YT C# version is playing I find that it is "close enough" for my ear. In fact I wonder if I could tell the difference in a blind test. Probably not.

I do know that most master musicians I have seen tune almost never use a tuner -- they find and feel their way to the foundation SA and then tune every other string in relation to that. My pitch detector tells me that this special C# is just slightly flatter than the regular 440 one.

I find that in actual practice if I do not check periodically with the tuner, I find myself going slightly sharper than a standard 440 C# on my Naskar sitar over a week or two, and going below the standard C# on my RikhiRam in that same period. This happens naturally with no deliberate intention.

I usually only check my actual absolute pitch if I am going to be playing with other instruments.

However, I do find these concepts interesting and I have seen mostly Native Americans swear by the 432 Hz foundation -- most of the musicians I met in India did not seem to care about absolute references. Though many spent a lot of time very carefully tuning an instrument or tanpura for 15 to 20 minutes before they felt it was right. Kishorit Amonkar has been known to tune her swarmandal for 30-40 minutes before she starts.

The reference site for some of the work that Cousto has been doing states:
Quote:
As Hans Cousto found out on his journeys to India, the sitar masters tune their instruments exactly or close to a C# 136.1 Hz. And they didn't use a Korg tuner or did mathematical acrobatics, but were actually in tune with the universe. This is the higher meaning of tuning an instrument: to be attuned with the nature of reality.
I think being "in tune" is REALLY important but am not sure if being exactly at 136.1 Hz at 432 is as important or even 136.1 at 440. I think this kind of precision might be an example of the theory obstructing the real intent which is to be "attuned".

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Kirya
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CheesecakeTomek

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Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
I think being "in tune" is REALLY important but am not sure if being exactly at 136.1 Hz at 432 is as important or even 136.1 at 440. I think this kind of precision might be an example of the theory obstructing the real intent which is to be "attuned".
Well put. I have not checked your past few links. They seem interesting and hopefully I can get some time when I am off of work to give them a view, particularly the Tedtalk peaks my interest.
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