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Jhaptal

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Reply with quote  #16 
I think possibly this goes much deeper into our hardwiring. From what I recall the north and south separated musically around 900Ad. I think a lot of it had to do with the silk road and the gypsies on the trade routes influencing the north of India and vice versa (both musically and otherwise). This influence never made it as far south. Point being, that influence that the travelers bought with them came predominately from the west and so subconsciously there's a lot more going on musically that we can relate too.
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povster

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Reply with quote  #17 
For me this is an easy question: What draws me to this music?

I feel it. It makes sense to me. When I listen to other music I always return to it. It takes me to places other art does not. I cannot put equations or speak scientifically about it. It just grabs me and refuses to let me go, more than any other art form or any other music..

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Dara

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Reply with quote  #18 
An experience of transcendent consciousness?
being at home with the mystery?
feeling the presence of raga?
The beauty of suspension, and release to Sa and Sum?
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saipk

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Reply with quote  #19 
I am attracted to Hindustani but am home with Carnatic I think both have a different feel. For me, Carnatic has a sense of festive and traditional feel whereas Hindustani is more on the imaginative and emotional side. Also, I think theoretically, Carnatic is bit more elaborate and complicated than Hindustani? Historically, may be Carnatic is more close to the original native music whereas Hindustani has probably came through significant influences from for ex. Persian etc.?
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bibhas

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Reply with quote  #20 
I grew up in South India listening to Carnatic music everyday and even started my first music lessons in that style. As I grew older, I got more attracted to Hindustani music and became a complete convert to the latter.

For me the essential difference lies in the emphasis on the lyrical content in carnatic music and lack of it in Hindustani. A lot of the emotion and feel in carnatic music is derived from the lyrics of the krithi while in Hindustani music it comes from the music itself. It naturally follows then that if you don't understand telugu or tamil or kannada (the languages in which most carnatic krithis are composed - and for the record, I do understand all of these), you're already one down in your ability to enjoy carnatic music. Such a problem does not exist with Hindustani music because even if you do understand Hindi/Braj/Punjabi etc, you wouldn't be able to understand what the bols of the bandish are in most cases and even when you do, they play almost no part in the emotional content/aesthetics of the music. This perhaps also explains why I almost always listen to only vocal music in Carnatic style while I have no such distinction with Hindustani.
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rajpuranik

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Reply with quote  #21 
Are we focusing on the performer's perspective or a listener's? I think it's hard to compare the two styles, just as its hard to compare WCM with ICM in general. I do listen more to Hindustani by far, but I think it has more to do with familiarity than preference. Hindustani does seem to demand more of a performer from within, especially where improvisation is concerned. Carnatic musicians are no doubt virtuosic, but playing fixed compositions just demands a different skill set.

I was introduced to Carnatic music just about three years ago, via concerts by Ganesh Kumaresh (violin duet) and Aruna Sairam (vocal) in Boston. I was completely blown away in both cases, and have made it a point to attend more Carnatic concerts since then. Ganesh Kumaresh's CD Sundaram is one of my all-time favorites of any style. I'm not sure if these are "modern" Carnatic performers relative to others.

I think Hindustani music's focus on the "alap" and its almost spiritual/introspective qualities (versus Carnatic music's almost complete abandonment of it) is probably what attracts most people to it. The hindustani alap is probably a unique concept in all world music.

Carnatic music on the other hand feels more like a well-orchestrated western chamber quartet. You can admire the technical virtuosity of the performers, but they ultimately seem subservient to the composers (especially the "triumvirate" of composers I have heard much about).

As a tabla player, I actually appreciate the mridangam's role in Carnatic music. I think the tabla is a more versatile instrument in general, but tabla performances in hindustani music these days often seem to rely more on occasional hyperkinetic bursts of tukdas and relas, while the mridangam players seem to add more rhythmic color to the melodic instrument without being concerned about speed.

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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "rajpuranik"
I think Hindustani music's focus on the "alap" and its almost spiritual/introspective qualities (versus Carnatic music's almost complete abandonment of it) is probably what attracts most people to it. The hindustani alap is probably a unique concept in all world music.
I have to say that the highlights of my Carnatic listening have always been the Ragam Thanam Pallavi performance form, which maybe stems from my approaching it from prior experience of Hindustani, as well as from linguistic and other cultural reasons.

RTP is often the centrepiece of a Carnatic concert, up to about an hour long, bounded by shorter pieces, and the alapana (=Ragam) can be as long as or longer than the T and P together. This is the equivalent of alap in Hindustani alap, which allows the performer (with the Thanam) full rein to explore the raga, before coming to the Pallavi composition.

So I think to anyone who is looking for an entry into Carnatic from Hindustani, seeking out some long performances of RTP would be a good way in.

Additionally look for some veena - E Gayathri's playing style is to my mind very accessible.
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Raga_Mala

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "ragamala"

I have to say that the highlights of my Carnatic listening have always been the Ragam Thanam Pallavi performance form, which maybe stems from my approaching it from prior experience of Hindustani, as well as from linguistic and other cultural reasons.

RTP is often the centrepiece of a Carnatic concert, up to about an hour long, bounded by shorter pieces, and the alapana (=Ragam) can be as long as or longer than the T and P together. This is the equivalent of alap in Hindustani alap, which allows the performer (with the Thanam) full rein to explore the raga, before coming to the Pallavi composition.

So I think to anyone who is looking for an entry into Carnatic from Hindustani, seeking out some long performances of RTP would be a good way in.
I have been listening to a great R-T-P with a great tani avartanam (drum solo) finale on the album "Ramnad Krishnan: Vidwan" it's a bit short as it had to fit on one side of an LP, but still very cool, and the liner notes on the CD are very illuminating regarding the R-T-P form and certain Carnatic Niceties.

I would also recommend for indoctrination into Carnatic listening the album "River Yamuna" by the Karnataka College of Percussion, with K. Raghavendran at the vina

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