INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

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chrisitar

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When I used to play guitar I would imagine my fingers on the frets playing what I was humming/hearing in my head as a form of practice without the instrument. Now that I've been playing sitar and practicing ragas for so many years I imagine the notes as a point on a line, unlike a guitar which has multiple points on multiple lines. Does anyone else 'visualize imaginary practice' ie: imagine the back of the neck with your thumb in place, imagine your fingers pulling the correct notes? That doesn't work perfectly for sitar because of meend, though. There are many ways to get to a note, as opposed to most other instruments, so visualizing my fingers is harder. Do you visualize the swaras as a single point on a line or the distance pulled from a fretted string?
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #2 
I'm not sure its quite the right parallel, but studying Indian music has caused me to visualize music a bit more...it's purely melodic and modal nature is such that I see it almost like points on a line graph....when studying for my "recital" of the entire Jhinjhoti that I was taught, I took several of the more complex taans and drew them out as such, using curved lines to indicate meend, things like that.

Unrelated to Hindustani, but I love this technology:


Something about watching it while listening, one can understand so much more of it, as you can see as well as hear what each instrument is doing, notice patterns, etc.
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Nastika

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Reply with quote  #3 
Yes! I have always mentally practiced like this. Saxophone, guitar, tabla....I believe it is extremely helpful with any instrument. Such a huge part of playing is mental anyway. Just focusing your mind on it, you can do a lot of 'woodshedding' even without your instrument. In some ways it is even better BECAUSE you don't have the distraction of the actual instrument. You can lay a lot of groundwork practicing a tricky part; then later, with instrument in hand, focus on the physical aspects. Its also a great way to train your sense of pitch. I like trying to figure out parts, riffs, melodies, etc mentally visualizing the fretboard; then checking to see where and how much I was off. Over time I've gotten more accurate.
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JRJ

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The swan lays the arc of it's wing against the water like a shadow on a tree
Not enough time to notice

J
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chrisitar

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Reply with quote  #5 
very nice words, but what is it?
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JRJ

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Reply with quote  #6 
Sorry for the obscurity but that "Asment" thing has been saying my posts are "spam" so I wanted to see if poetry would get through.
I guess poems are okay?

I play with my eyes closed alot and try to follow the line you mentioned. Very intuitive if you do it for long periods of time;
more that ten minutes...

J
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