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at123

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Posts: 126
Reply with quote  #1 
I have a copy of "Vintage Tabla Repertory: Drum Compositions of North Indian Classical Music" by Gert-Matthias Wegner and would highly recommend this book to anyone. It's got tons of compositions with variations and represents the repertoire of Pandit Niklhil Ghosh (father of the great virtuoso Nayan Ghosh). It's definitely not for beginners and would be most useful to those who have been playing for at least a few years.

There is a section with the words of wisdom of Nikhil Ghosh:

"Practice only a few things. You will gain others within this realm. If you practice ten things, you lose ten things. If you practice one thing, you gain ten things."

Per the recent discussion about teachers having students practice only a few qaidas/tukdas/etc for years, how does one actually "gain" a lot by practicing only a few things?

at123
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Jarkko Laiho

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Reply with quote  #2 
In my opinion if the player is only starting out there is no need for a lot of compositions, but they need to be well selected to strengthen all the basic techniques. They can't be too difficult so that student can concentrate in having a good, clear tone and balance with both bayan and dayan.

When player is more advanced he can be taught few key compositions to master more difficult techniques like dhenegene, dhiradhira etc. If a beginner is trying to practice all of these at the same time it won't happen. You need to have the basic techniques learned at certain level before moving on.

Even the basic kaidas sound amazing in the hands of a true Ustad. The clear tone, balance and power are essential. You have to be patient to get there and do some hard work and concentrate on the sound, technique and repertoire that you are learning. Learning have to be wisely constructed. If one is willing to work hard and he has true Ustad he can become a good tabla player. True Ustad knows how to teach. He will give you enough material if you work hard and show that you're serious about tabla.
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scodoha

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Reply with quote  #3 
"VTR" makes a distinction between playing ne and nê (ne with a line over it). The two bols must be very similar, but does anyone know authoritatively the difference?
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at123

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Reply with quote  #4 
What page are you referring to?

at123
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Shawn

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Reply with quote  #5 
I seriously would not try to learn a composition from a book. The results are too unpredictable. Books are interesting for historical and theoretical information (and even these can be innacurate), but compositions need to be taught by a person.

Don't we all have too much to practice anyways?

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Shawn Mativetsky
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Aanaddha

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Shawn"
... compositions need to be taught by a person.
For beginners this is almost certainly true. But, by the time he or she reaches an intermediate level I'd dare to say that every student can and should be taking some self-inintiative to learn what they can from the wealth of other sources, with or without (preferably with) their guru's guidance. Yes, every attempt at tabla transcription is, by it's nature of transformation from the vocal to the written, inherently fallible, some more than others. That said, though it's not absolutely perfect, the VTR is still the most comprehensive resource of tabla repertoiry to date, especially of Laliyana, Delhi, Ajrara, Lucknow, Farukhabbad, and Punjab gharana compositions. The choice to play 'ne' or 'nê' should be discerned by the composition's local origin, it's gharana or the composer's style - - that however, that shouldn't prevent one from enjoying it's essence or to attempt to accommodate a given composition to your own or your guru's style. This is also how we learn.
While I personally admire and much respect Pt. Sharda Sahai's committment to tradition in general and to his preservation of the much documented Sahai branch of the Benares Gharana, his method of teaching and his approach to learning may not be for everyone.

A.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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Kanti Dattani

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Reply with quote  #7 
Who are the present day Laliyana gharana tabla players? I know of only one, Nizamuddin Khan born 1927. Are there any more who exclusively belong to Laliyana gharana?

Regards,

Kanti
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scodoha

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Posts: 302
Reply with quote  #8 
"I seriously would not try to learn a composition from a book. The results are too unpredictable."

Yes, I practiced a composition from a book once and it blew out all the street lights on my block. Its serious stuff messing around with books.
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Aanaddha

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Reply with quote  #9 
"I seriously would not try to learn a composition from a book. The results are too unpredictable."


He's right, S. Those darn books, I once tried playing a composition from a book and I haven't been able to stop playing tabla since! :?

A.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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scodoha

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Reply with quote  #10 
"What page..." page 56 third paragraph, actually just a dot over the ne. :?:
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