INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Lukecash12

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 136
Reply with quote  #1 
I know a few amateurs, but not very many maestros in these categories. Could anyone brief me on the most "important" names from today and yesterday?
__________________
The statement below this is false.
The statement above this is true.
0
jaan e kharabat

Registered:
Posts: 1,401
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Lukecash12"
I know a few amateurs, but not very many maestros in these categories. Could anyone brief me on the most "important" names from today and yesterday?
If you are not already familiar with this site, sarangi.info has a wealth of recordings by some of the greatest past masters of that instrument (and vocals too) but with an emphasis on players from contemporary Pakistan:

http://sarangi.info/sarangi/

I think it is pretty much universally acknowledged that the most important name in sarangi playing in the 20th Century was Ustad Bundu Khan of the Dehli khaandadaan.

Contemporary stalwarts and famous names in India include the likes of Pandit Ram Narayan and Ustad Sultan Khan, though the former is in his 80's now.

__________________
If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
0
musicslug

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 280
Reply with quote  #3 
if by veena you mean rudra (not Saraswati), the list of 'maestros' is pretty short: Z.M.Dagar (died 1990), his son Bahauddin Dagar, Asad Ali Khan, and Shamsuddin Faridi Desai - each one playing quite distinct styles. (I'm tempted to add my guru, Jeff Lewis, to the list, but there are no commercial recordings available, only private ones.)

going back in time, to the early 20th c. and before, the names multiply, but of course there are only legends and no recordings - at least none that I know of.
0
ragamala

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,740
Reply with quote  #4 
Hmm ;-) I might agree perhaps that Ustad Bundu Khan was one of the most important in the first half of the 20th century, and Pandit Ram Narayan the most important of the second half of the century. For the reason they are both credited with establishing sarangi as a solo instrument. But others might introduce eg Abdul Lateef Khan into this mix.

Unfortunately we do not have a huge amount of Bundu Khan to listen to, but I would venture to say that on the technical side Ram Narayan was and is the master.

What is apparent from the recordings is Bundu Khan's love of playing, as well as his mastery of the instrument. Re Ram Narayan, at first, when I had only heard his recordings, I thought his playing somewhat dry and austere. It wasn't until I heard him live in concert that I fully realised his musicianship as well as his technical accomplishment. Learning the sarangi yourself puts the technical achievement more into perspective, I have to say.
----
Lukecash, from the sarangi site, you'll be able to pick up, if you haven't already done so, as well as all the precious recordings, the "Voice of the Sarangi" book by Joep Boer, which is excellent, and deals with a number of past masters.

Nicolas Magriel's sarangi site http://www.sarangi.net pictures a good number of sarangi players whom he met in his research travels.

Are all these masters? In my opinion yes, they represent a dying tradition. Going are the days of hereditary musicianship, going are the days of sarangi accompaniment to khyal and dhrupad.

Interestingly, in Varanasi I bumped into one of the players pictured in Nicolas's site, Faiyaz Ali Khan. He had just finished playing with a sitar and tabla for some Russian tourists, in the rooftop restaurant (!). The hotel manager introduced him as the best sarangi player in Varanasi. Well he would say that, wouldn't he, I thought.. I was sad to have missed Faiyaz Ali's playing, but chatting to him I found he knew Nicolas and remembered him well. Nicolas taught me for a short while in the eighties. On the strength of this connection betwen us Ustad Faiyaz Ali played for me a short solo piece. I was over the moon, he played beautifully.

Going back to the question, I think of the old masters who are worth special seeking out Gopal Mishra has to be at the top of my suggestion list. Once heard, it's difficult to forget his flowing dreamy style. Sadly there are few recordings of his around. Also Hanuman Prasad Mishra - there's a Baithak CD of a concert performance worth finding. There are some cds of Abdul Lateef Khan (student of the great Ghulam Sabir Khan, whose recordings are hard to get - find his darbari if you can), whether in print I don't know, including a good Lalit as example of his style.

Of younger performers I have come to the conclusion Druv Ghosh is outstanding.

There are of course a number of sarangi cds around, not many, but some - Sabri Khan and his family, Ramesh Mishra, Lyaqat Ali, Munir Khan etc. Any are worth picking up. But I fear that most of the master sarangi players go largely unnoticed and don't publish these days.
0
ragamala

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,740
Reply with quote  #5 
Re rudra veena I can't add much to musicslug's list - but suggest look out for
Habib Ali Khan
as something a bit different and interesting style.
There's an album "Music Pakistan" which has been reconstructed from holistic's files on mediafire, and from esnips. These are 10 tracks of non-dhrupad style playing. V good.

There is more music around but not much -
Hindraj Divekar
Dabir Khan (I have just one track)
and of course don't forget Suvir!
0
jaan e kharabat

Registered:
Posts: 1,401
Reply with quote  #6 
There has popped up a few short recordings of Ustad Hussain Bakhsh Amritsari on youtube lately. His playing was exquisite, e.g. in this Hindol:



I also discovered that his grandson is keeping alive the family tradition in Lahore and am impressed by his playing. Here is a clip of this Zohaib Hassan:



Really like the playing of Gouri Banerjee, student of Ustad Sabri Khan, too from the little I heard on youtube:


__________________
If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
0
ragamala

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,740
Reply with quote  #7 
That reminds me - thanks jek for those postings -

Even better, we do have a longer recording - at least one - of Hussain Bax.
Holistic (who is doing a fine job of promoting Pakistani artists, who deserve better recognition) has posted some interesting sarangi, including

http://www.mediafire.com/holistic

on his instrumental 5 page
04 MALSRI_HUSSAIN BAKSH SARANGIA.mp3


Nathu Khan is also a master - look for (others are on sarangi web site)
01 Bageshri on Sarangi_Nathu Khansahib-Sarangi~Allah Ditta Biharipuriya-Tabla.mp3

on holistics instrumental 6 folder, which btw also has some habib ali khan veena
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.