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VNO Design

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Reply with quote  #1 
If you tune to both at the beginning you won't have to check something at the end of your efforts and re-tune. I've never heard of anyone just tuning to Na.

Instead of smacking your Tabla on the ground or another surface, just tap lightly around with your hammer after making block (gatta) adjustments will free the held friction/tension at the rim. There is really no other reason for doing this.

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Reply with quote  #2 
I can see why you're confused. Firstly, there are only 4 available points to adjust on a Tabla at any one time.

Here is how to get your Tabla in balance at any pitch:

1. Strike a Na and Tin above any of the blocks. Listen carefully. You will hear one of 2 things. A warble or a straight tone. If you hear a warble go to step 2, if you hear a straight tone, skip to step 3.

2. Rotate your Tabla exactly 45degrees (you will be above the next block) You will now hear a straight tone. Listen carefully.

3. Rotate your Tabla exactly 90degrees (you will be over another block) Strike Na and Tin again. Notice which of the tones is higher or lower. Decide to bring the Low into the High, or the High into the Low. Starting at your selected point, strike with your hammer in the proper direction WHILE PLAYING TIN. If no movement is heard, move the corresponding block in the proper direction a bit and strike with the hammer again WHILE PLAYING TIN. If you need your reference point again, rotate back 90degrees and listen.

4. Your Tabla is now in balance.

5. To tune your Tabla, repeat the steps, but first aim for a specific pitch by adjusting the blocks globally, then match using these same directions.

Hope this helps folks! I'm planning on creating an interface for this when I get some time.

Cheers,
-David

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Khitchdee, I'm aware there are 8 gattas. Did you know that one side directly affects the side opposite? Therefore there are only 4 points to tune at any one time.

The way I know it works is all my Tablas are in tune and sound as they should. I've been at this for quite some time now. How bout you give it a shot and let me know what you think?

Cheers,

-David

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Neogeotoo

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "VNO
I can see why you're confused. Firstly, there are only 4 available points to adjust on a Tabla at any one time.

Here is how to get your Tabla in balance at any pitch:

1. Strike a Na and Tin above any of the blocks. Listen carefully. You will hear one of 2 things. A warble or a straight tone. If you hear a warble go to step 2, if you hear a straight tone, skip to step 3.

2. Rotate your Tabla exactly 45degrees (you will be above the next block) You will now hear a straight tone. Listen carefully.

3. Rotate your Tabla exactly 90degrees (you will be over another block) Strike Na and Tin again. Notice which of the tones is higher or lower. Decide to bring the Low into the High, or the High into the Low. Starting at your selected point, strike with your hammer in the proper direction WHILE PLAYING TIN. If no movement is heard, move the corresponding block in the proper direction a bit and strike with the hammer again WHILE PLAYING TIN. If you need your reference point again, rotate back 90degrees and listen.

4. Your Tabla is now in balance.

5. To tune your Tabla, repeat the steps, but first aim for a specific pitch by adjusting the blocks globally, then match using these same directions.

Hope this helps folks! I'm planning on creating an interface for this when I get some time.

Cheers,
-David

An excellent, concise summary of the procedure. Thank you
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sohummusicals

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Reply with quote  #5 
"Opposite have same tension " is not an assumption. It is the truth and practically implemented.
I have learned tabla from two teachers , one was student of ustad Amir Hussain Khan Saab, he showed me this technique for tuning like 25 yrs ago. I have been using this technique since then.
Kitchdee , if your dayan doesn't give same tension on opposite points , there is something seriously wrong with it.
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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Khitchdee"
In theory, and if you model it, the "opposites have same tension" assumption is good.
In practice it's not.
Khitchdee,

Again, I am simply stunned at how ignorant you are about Tabla, yet continually post on here with topics where you "set things in stone" and bring ideas that are based on nothing but your own assumptions. Don't you realize this is detrimental to yourself and beginners? I have to assume you mean well, but if you don't know what you're talking about, why not pose a question via post instead of giving a false answer to a question nobody even asked?

Now you're going to argue with people who obviously DO know what they're talking about? Give it a rest already.

Regards,
-David

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rch

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi David
You really seem to be highly knowledgeable about tuning! I am a beginner-intermediate student, tuning all these years perhaps wrongly, more in line with going in circles. I was wondering if you wouldn't mind briefly elaborating on the #3 step on your post. Or even better,if you could post a video how you tune your tabla. I have seen several videos on tuning but none the way as you described it. If I understand your technique correctly, if I hear a straight tone first, would I just need to maneuver at just 2 points only 0 and 90 degrees,and the whole head is in tune??
Please clarify. Thanks a lot.
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Reply with quote  #8 
I also would be interested in a clear tuning explanation. Thanks a lot for your time.
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VNO Design

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi guys,

Here is a picture that should help:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/102945218/Tabla%20Tuning.png

I'm swamped with other projects at the moment, but I will get around to making a video about this much needed topic.

So assuming you have a Tabla that was in tune and balance at some stage, this is the method for fine tuning along with minor block movements. If your Tabla is way out of balance or you are reheading, the process is different because you need to get relatively even tension on the straps first. I say relative because even if straps are equal tension, the head may be out of tune. This is due to the grain of the hide and the way your particular head will stretch.

Playing above any peg will give you the reference point to begin the process already described earlier in this thread. To elaborate on Step 3, say we want to bring the Low area to match the High. Now strike with your hammer on the braid at the Low spot, in between the straps, while playing "Tin". Listen for the pitch to go up like you expect it to. If it does not, move the peg you are on downward to add tension and repeat. You should be able to hear the pitch change and equal the High spot. If it does, then your warble will be gone too. Sometimes you will create a new warble and the previous warbles will turn to your High and Low. The same process still works though, so just do it again. With a little practice you will get really good at this and be able to tune in no time! The critical part is to not panic and spin the Tabla randomly around. Tuning is scientific and has a distinct method to accomplish it quickly. All the information you need is always within a 90degree arc on your drum.

Cheers, -David
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Khitchdee"
I'm still sticking to my "check tin only at the end" theory,
and my "use only the gattas to tune" theory.
Khitchdee, this is precicely the reason you remain in the dark about Tabla. I cannot fathom your unwillingness to learn a proper method after hearing it from multiple sources. Best of luck in your "go it alone" style.

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taaliyan

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Reply with quote  #10 
David is 100% correct.
If you are a beginner , you should learn to tune properly - which means not hitting the 8 gattas.
All the tabla teachers and the leading manufacturers will teach you to tune the way David has described.
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Reply with quote  #11 
Khitchdee, what are you talking about?
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Khitchdee"
Once you get good at tuning,
David's method applies, but before that,
you have to train your ears the hard way.
The whole point of learning to tune properly from the beginning is so you don't have to use an inefficient or incorrect method. Why would one have to learn the hard way first? Your reasoning makes no sense, and dare I say it, but maybe you should find more learned teachers.

Best,

-David

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Reply with quote  #12 
Khitchdee,

Yes tuning challenges exist in all climate types and all quality Tablas to a different degree. There is optimal, but you can't count on that as a player and especially as a travelling player. This however has nothing to do with "going around in circles" to tune, or learning to tune properly. The correct tuning method is the same irrespective of the climate or Tabla quality. In fact it's even more imperative that you learn to tune quickly and accurately with an inferior Tabla because you will need to do so more frequently and perhaps on stage mid-performance. What if your usual Tabla was damaged in flight and you had to borrow an unknown drum? Are you now screwed because you only learned to tune with a process that takes 10 or 15minutes? Someone who has studied and practiced how to tune properly should be able to get any Tabla in balance in about 1 or 2 minutes, regardless of it's condition or how badly it is out of balance, provided it doesn't need strap pulling. A good player with a Tabla that has been pre-tuned should be able to keep in in tune if it goes out in about 10-30 seconds at most. If you can't do either of these things, then practice tuning the proper way!

You're also correct that ear training is critical to tuning your Tabla or any instrument. But trying to backup your flawed theory of checking Tin at the end with this statement doesn't work. This is the same erroneous argument you have for using only the pegs/gattas to tune.

The more difficult way does not help you to learn to do something properly! Only the proper way practiced from as early a point as you can implement it into your regime will train you in the most efficient manner. The student who learns to do something right early will always have a leg up on the student who learns incorrectly and then has to correct their mistake down the road. I'm pretty sure there is a consensus on this, which is why I'm shocked at these statements from you still defending your position from months ago. It's as if your stubbornly refusing to practice something correctly or learn a new method which is the very reason of this forum! Honestly what you do on your own is your business, go for it. But posting on here for new Tabla players with bogus facts like you do is harmful to new students of this instrument and I'm going to say something.

Best Wishes to you,

-David

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Reply with quote  #13 
Khitchdee you are just rambling now, and I think there is something wrong with your Tabla. Maybe the makers glued your head on with the laquer they applied, or maybe you are hearing what you want to hear. These aren't theories, and this topic has nothing to do with the quality of your Tabla as I've already explained.

Good luck,

-David

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