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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #16 
Dear Martin
Re the brace post, admittedly it is a tricky job with the skin on, requiring a bit of ingenuity and patience, but it can be done, as I have successfully on a couple of occasions. Using the hole you mention, it's a bit like keyhole surgery!

But certainly easier than replacing a skin.

Best wishes
Alan
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kaustabh

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Reply with quote  #17 
Great, great, I can see the post in there already. So my poor little Sarangi escapes the ICU. :mrgreen:
Thanks for early warning.
Kaustabh
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #18 
Dear Ragamala,

After having posted last, I had second thoughts about it - I could imagine some tools you'd need for this key-hole-operation much in the way of how a soundpost is placed in a violin, which I've done often in the past. But I hope that every sarangi-repairer would check the brace post thoroughly whenever a reskinning is performed... I've seen only one distorted brace, it had bent under pressure due to the grain not being straight.
best wishes to you! martin
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kaustabh

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hi, today I have some success to mention. Finally I got some success. As it appears I can now tune my Sarangi with some level of satisfaction. It was not so difficult with the main strings. For the sympathetic strings however I took some help from a Sitar player. He has much better ear than me. I feel really thankful to Ragmala and Martin, without the help they provided it would have been much more difficult for me.

I was thinking about the resin dust for the last couple of days. The desin dust from the bow can turn really sticky if it is allowed to settle down for a period on the instrument. I can see already it is visible on the upper face of the bridge, sympathetic strings and the skin too. How do you clean it? is there any tricks for better cleaning?
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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "kaustabh"
I was thinking about the resin dust for the last couple of days. The desin dust from the bow can turn really sticky if it is allowed to settle down for a period on the instrument. I can see already it is visible on the upper face of the bridge, sympathetic strings and the skin too. How do you clean it? is there any tricks for better cleaning?
Hi - glad you are settling in with your sarangi.

I am not big on technical solutions, so you might get better advice from elsewhere, maybe Martin.

I think the best thing to do is avoid overuse of rosin in the first place.

Then after each playing session have a gentle clean. This should avoid any build-up.

When the rosin is loose a simple method like blowing the debris away will work!

For a better cleaning I use a soft long-haired artist's brush plus an airjet from a camera lens blower or something similar - actually my preference is for a plastic tube with a rubber puffer bulb - an oven baster.

Rosin on the playing strings can be removed after a session with a clean cloth.

If neglected, stubborn rosin residue on strings can be removed by a gentle sanding with glasspaper, also good for rounding off string wear. If rosin has built up on sympathetics then a string change is maybe best?

The issue of rosin build up on the bow itself and its removal has I think been the subject of a fairly recent topic on the forum, so you might get some suggestion there.

But if in doubt prevention is better than cure and start off maybe under- rather than over- rosining the bow.
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #21 
I fully concur with Dr. Ragamala, who gave you a pretty conclusive list. I always have a brush to clean the strings in the case. Somehow the rosin I use is not sticky, it's just dust and will only build up a bit on the string but not to significantly add to the thickness. If you can not brush off the tarabs, but uncleanliness would be the only problem, you can always clean them with a fine scotch scouring pad or a linen cloth with some alcohol as long as you can get to them, you might have to loosen up a few to reach in. Loosening strings and cleaning them is less work and you'll get your share of changing strings in due time.
Good that you found someone to tune the tarabs for you and show you how. always refer to the laraj string for main sa, and not the playing strings that sound different when plucked than when bowed. In good hair days, having tuned mylady, she would purr and buzz all over after plucking the laraj. Also in getting the resonance going while playing, the laraj string is important. Can you get it audibly and visually responding when you bow sa?
continued happy trails, martin
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #22 
PS I remembered that I saved some old mails in which i tried to answer some of the questions that were put before me, from which I quote a section that deals with tuning business. There might be something useful in there if you can follow my particular way of trying to explain things (as i see it. Anyway you're welcome to it.

>>I am talking about the tuning of your tarabs?<<
So what are you asking? The tuning itself? Which svaras to choose in the string-set up? I think I gave you some info on how the 9 & 15 lower tarabs are tuned. The tuning of the longer upper tarabs depend on whether you intend to do a solo sarangi performance or are accompanying. When accompanying one might choose for adaptability, anticipating a wide range of thats, which would mean to spread the available strings over as many komal, shuddh and tivra svaras. In soloplaying you could tune more strings (in different octaves) to vadi and samvadi svaras, have sa's in tar, madhya and mandra saptak etc. so as to fully attune all tarabs to the specific svaras of one particular raga.

How all this tuning business is done with specific positions of the svaras and consonances is a long story. In my case, I had through practice with tanpura tuning and playing and my singing experience already developed a keen sense of hearing. Tuning and playing sarangi has made me advance even more. When I tune the tarabs I make sure I can hear the subtle sustain-sound, the resonance of the svara and to make it harmonize with other svaras. So for instance Darbari I start tuning the 9 lower tarabs from ni, linear to tar sa. Then I go back over it again and start cross-checking. ni & re should give the a very precise interval for Dabari from which you can properly intone the special komal ga. but to get ni - re perfect first is vital! it is a particular kind of major third (ni-sa sa-re, two tones) that has its own distinctive color. Don't pluck them together but after each other, let the tone ni swell up and then play re, if it feels good, do it again with the same timing/dynamics and then go to sa, which should be in the middle of the two. When this is sure, play ni - sa dha, sing it, feel where komal dha is, play it again, adjust, repeat end extend to pa. so you check dha in relation to the frase ni -sa - dha, pa. So in my experience it is best to try and stay in raga, play important frases and svaras in relation to each other. Check all inner consonances of a raga: svaras at a perfect 4 or 5th apart, 3rds. So in Bhairavi, all svaras are komal, so sa-pa, re-dha- ga-ni and ma-sa are 5th-consonant pairs. If the komal re is in a special low position usually komal dha is also in a low position, giving inner resonance to the svaras.
In a shuddh scale, all svaras in high position (Yaman) sa-pa, re-dha, ga-ni. Tivra ma is out as it makes a diminished interval with sa above as it makes an augmented interval with Sa below. This way you can optimize tuning .
You can also do it by yourself with no external sa reference as electronic stuffed tanpuras etc. by using the laraj as a reference and creating more consonances as you go you automatically create more sustain and resonance so the sound really grows under your fingers if you go along properly. Always keep on checking Sa strings to stay 100% aligned while you go on tuning (for this you might want to practice with some exact reference pitch such as an electronic tuner which can produce any exact pitch - tune sa in to it, put it out. listen to the strings! just every now and then check sa, put the tuner on, if necessary adjust, put it offf again.
Don't leave it on while you are tuning other svaras then Sa as the sound of the tuner will mask the resonance of the tarabs. My opinion, at least..
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kaustabh

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Reply with quote  #23 
Thanks Martin for the idea of using the 4th string for reference. It is a great help for me now as I am trying to loosen all the strings and retune them again without any active help. Sooner or later I have to tune my instrument all by myself.
For cleaning of the rosin dust I am using a couple of painting brushes and my chemistry lab blow pipe. The brush is fine for most of the time, if it fail to reach some lower part I use the blow pipe. It can reach vertually everywhere where the dust can reach. If I clean it regularly these should be enough as it appears.
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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #24 
Any chance please of this topic being moved to the string instrument forum?
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FabianKempe

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Reply with quote  #25 
Hello everyone! I'm on my way to tune my saranbgi but the first posts i canot seem to see the images, why?
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