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coughcapkittykat

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Reply with quote  #61 
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Originally Posted by "povster"
One thing to consider, carl, is that the process of properly learning one raga is of tremendous benefit to learning others.
I'm curious about this Povster, could you explain in what ways learning one raga helps with another? I understand that general techniques cross over but doesn't each (or most) ragas have their own signatures, like what has been talked about in this thread with regards to Bhairavi? I'm not doubting what you say but, as I am still on my first raga, I am wondering what exactly translate from Yaman, for example, to say Bhairavi.
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povster

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Reply with quote  #62 
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Originally Posted by "coughcapkittykat"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "povster"
One thing to consider, carl, is that the process of properly learning one raga is of tremendous benefit to learning others.
I'm curious about this Povster, could you explain in what ways learning one raga helps with another? I understand that general techniques cross over but doesn't each (or most) ragas have their own signatures, like what has been talked about in this thread with regards to Bhairavi? I'm not doubting what you say but, as I am still on my first raga, I am wondering what exactly translate from Yaman, for example, to say Bhairavi.
Well, coughcapkittykat - this is going to be hard to put into words without sounding like a space cadet.

You are correct in surmising that it is not the content of the raga that I was referring to. First, yes, technique can be transferred form one raga to another, and learning proper technique will greatly assist in future ragas.

But another reason is kind of hidden amongst your own words when you say each raga has its own signatures.

It is that first realization, as a student, of the signatures for a raga that is the telling thing. One could call it the "Ah Ha moment" where something clicks and you say or think "Ah Ha - I get it!" for the first time - when you actually understand how that raga feels. And as you keep going in that raga you start to realize that some note combinations are NOT that raga and don't, somehow, "feel right", even though those notes are included in the scale.

The initial realization from your first "Ah Ha" raga helps you to understand and enforce the signatures in your next raga. As you progress with new ragas, and as you go back to previous ragas, those signatures become more complex or subtler or far reaching. It is also the simultaneous realization that these signatures are what Raga is really about. And that there is a deliberate attempt to explore and expand on those signatures that is what playing this music is about.

In Carl's case, it sounds like he has not had the Ah Ha moment. He has been listening to and practicing Bhairavi for over a year but does not use the basic Bhairavi phrases. It is very difficult to get that moment without a teacher.

Once you get that moment your perception, as a student, is radically altered.

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Dasani - the official bottled water of ICM
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cabernethy

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Reply with quote  #63 
OK Cadet, convinced I am - The Kirwani DVD order is in !!!

Thanks again,
Carl
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coughcapkittykat

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Reply with quote  #64 
Thanks Povster, that's certainly food for thought, and very helpful.
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