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CheesecakeTomek

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Posts: 513
Reply with quote  #1 
Hey Y'all,

So my Ma tuning bead/swan has lost just about all its friction on the tabli. What to do in this situation? I've noticed many sitars have a strip of fabric of some kind along the path of the bead. What material is this? How is it applied? Alternative solutions? Threads in which this has already been answered? All input is welcome. I would like to get this fixed before my next lesson so that precious time is not wasted addressing the matter there.

Cheers,
Tomek
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #2 
A few differing opinions on this but the standard thing to do is cut some small angled slots on the bottom of the bead/tuning swan and cut a strip of self adhesive sandpaper for friction, never fails to work, most sitar players use this method in India, some don't bother to glue the sandpaper down even. Tony Karasek likes to glue a piece of leather under the bead to keep it from slipping which can work depending on tabli shape, etc.
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sitardoc

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Reply with quote  #3 
go to the shoe store and ask them for a piece of hard pigskin. get some contact cement and glue tour swan/bead to it, trimming off the excess. i've never understood using jackass sandpaper for this application-it's totally non-smooth and fills quickly reducing it's usefulness to nothing. pm me if you have any questions.
-the doc
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daz199

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Reply with quote  #4 
sand paper works for me..glue a strip down
medium-fine grit works nice
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "sitardoc"
. i've never understood using jackass sandpaper.
-the doc
I'm not familiar with that brand of sandpaper but any type should work more or less. The idea of leather or pigskin is good I think, problem is it doesn't always work. Leather works if you play sitar up and down the frets guitar style with minimal meends but as soon as you start pulling the string more it's more likely to slip. Take it from someone who has tried both methods....It's a simple matter of physics.....I know it can 'maybe' mess up the finish but just repolish it then if that's an issue, it's an instrument after all, not a piece of furniture....everyone uses or has used this method; from Nikhil Banerjee to Ravi Shankar to Vilayat Khan.

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm a leather fan. "Oooh, baby!" One other thing you should do is take a look at the side of the duckie and see how much of its chest and gut area is actually in contact with the tabli. Most of these duckies come from a sweatshop so no custom fitting is done. Chances are the chest area is the only part that will be contacting the tabli. This means there is minimal friction and rocking of the duckie as well, especially during any meend on the string. If this is the case (you'll see lots of daylight between the duckie and the tabli), take off the string and file / sand the bottom edge of the duckie until more of its surface area is touching the tabli. Since the string hole in the duckie determines the final angle the duckie will be in relation to the tabli, the chest filing is the only thing you can do to help the situation.

Sandpaper glued to the tabli will work to create a nonskid surface but it is so ugly, it just hurts my feelings. The sandpaper residue can also stray and scuff up the tabli finish. Leather or pigskin glued to the duckies chest works best for me. Mole skin from a drum shop will also do the job. Play on !

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element-82

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Lars"
I'm not familiar with that brand of sandpaper .
LOL!

I have used both as well and I am going to sugguest another option: heavy gauge rubber. I find leather dries out and slips. My climate is crazy dry in the winter. Sandpaper works fine, but I could never find the right colour. The adhesive sanding disks work well though and never mared the finish. I bought some strap wrenchs that have a very heavy duty black rubber strap. Cut a piece to shape as described above. I find it works great.

Pb

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Surbahar Dude (formerly Sitar Dude)
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