INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
adunc069

Registered:
Posts: 316
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, What do you bhais and bhens think about transcrbing stuff from your gurus cd's? When I first met my teacher he said if you ask to learn something, it's like being greedy and saying what you have already is not good enough. But if you see something you like, then to take it. he said how else are you supposed to get better? Maybe this is just a funny way of looking at it, but I have'nt seen my teacher in a few months, and the last new material I learned was from Ustadji in Toronto last year....anyways, do you sitaryas think it's a dissrespectful thing to do, or well intended aspiration?
__________________
Sadaqat chup nahi sakti banawat ke usolon
se, Ki khushbu a nahi sakti kabhi kaghez ke phoolon se
0
Anonymous

Registered:
Posts: 987
Reply with quote  #2 
How stupid you sound.

"Hi, What do you bhais and bhens think about transcrbing stuff from your gurus cd's?"

Its thinking like that that keeps you and your other bhais and bhens at a level of begginer for your life time. Don't be pathetic. Become a real performer and take what ever you need. Your "teacher" will do nothing for you outside teach you some sargam and take your money. Other than that, he will tell you to suck on a chocolate and nurse your sore arse. Sorry to be so abrassive, but all who read this forum laugh at your stupid questions and watch in great amusement as you all run your mouths about something you really can't produce. Keep it up.
0
Drew

Registered:
Posts: 214
Reply with quote  #3 
worldmusic has a very good point.

except for the mean parts? (I guess you guys dont like each other?)

but ya, do what you need to do or you will be left behind at the beginners table. And the part about your teacher just teaching you sargam and taking your money is sad but very true. I just hope your teacher is different.


now, go and lift/transcribe to your hearts content and email me a copy! :wink:

__________________
< >..

Always have 1 eye open
0
barend

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,045
Reply with quote  #4 
after having lessons for 4 years, I am playing for almost a year now without any teacher....I now have learned plenty of excersises and ragas.....what I do now is listen to all the recordings of the great artists and try to copy the things I want to learn....for example when I want to learn jor I listen to say 3 or 4 players and listen to what they are doing....and then trying to copy the things that I like....I don't care which gharana this player is from.....I just take what I like and then try to blend it in my own playing....

It really helps my playing a lot.....I can find my own voice this way.....

and besides this the most important thing is to keep playing all kinds of excersises every day.
0
povster

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,474
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "worldmusiclove"
How stupid you sound.

"Hi, What do you bhais and bhens think about transcrbing stuff from your gurus cd's?"

Its thinking like that that keeps you and your other bhais and bhens at a level of begginer for your life time. Don't be pathetic. Become a real performer and take what ever you need. Your "teacher" will do nothing for you outside teach you some sargam and take your money. Other than that, he will tell you to suck on a chocolate and nurse your sore arse. Sorry to be so abrassive, but all who read this forum laugh at your stupid questions and watch in great amusement as you all run your mouths about something you really can't produce. Keep it up.
That is so true, worldmusiclover. (May I call you "world"?) Lettuce visit the ideal teacher together.

*** Herein Begins the Lesson ***

"Ahh, my dear disciple. There is so much to reveal today."

"In truth, Guruji? I am so thrilled by your teachings."

"Yes, my own sweet pet. For today we shall master the art of spontaneous creativity. I shall reveal to you the secrets of the true giants. How they so easily create the most beautiful melodies and rhythms."

"Guruji, my life is a blank slate. Pray engrave your wisdom upon me."

"Your words make me happy, my son. For tomorrow, we shall create a new raga. A new beauty to bring into the world and to honor all who have come before us."

*** Thus endeth the lesson. ***

Learn your sargams. Learn your challans. Learn your gats. Learn your tans. Learn your paltas. Learn the simple patterns and ideas. These are the most precious things your teacher can give you, for these are the things that make up the core of the raga. Regardless of how beautiful your intonaiton, how complex your mirs or how fast your tans, if these things that give you a sore arse are missing, there is no beauty in even the most complex and sophisticated of techniques, because the raga itself will be missing.

Be grateful your teacher gives you the basics, over and over. And when the time is right, you will start to find your own sense and your own creativity. But that sense and creativity will have a foundation of purity and truth in the raga.

__________________
...Michael
Dasani - the official bottled water of ICM
Panini - the official bread of ICM
0
sitarman

Registered:
Posts: 599
Reply with quote  #6 
Dear Worldmusiclove,
I find it difficult to understand how a person who has "love" in their forum name can be so demeaning and rude to another member. There is a way to criticize, disagree, and enlighten that does not involve calling names and nastiness. If what a person says is true and has merit, (as your points did ijn my opinion) more will listen to it if said with love, not disdain.
0
rex@sitar.co.za

Registered:
Posts: 675
Reply with quote  #7 
Barend, I do the exactly the same thing. I have a great teacher, but I only see him a few months of the year and there's a limit to what any teacher can do for you. At some point you have to fly from the nest and find your own voice. I spend a great deal of time listening to my favourite recordings, from every sitar player, and working out the part I like myslef. It's a wonderful exercise and deeply enriching.
0
Andius

Registered:
Posts: 84
Reply with quote  #8 
I agree with sitarman about worldmusic****. How did he start his post? quote: "How stupid you sound." unquote. Later on he apologizies for being so "abrassive" (sic). Worldmusic****, if you are really sorry, why do it?
You also said:" all who read this forum laugh at your stupid questions...." WRONG.
As soon as I started your post I mentally put you in the trash can; despite some good points raised. You cannot expect people to come around to your way of thinking or respect you if you punch them on first meeting! Can you try to be more respectful of others viewpoints? You'll get more back.
Ho Hum, at least you've livened things up a bit.
0
Sitarfixer

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,937
Reply with quote  #9 
Having seen more than a few "Gurus" in action fleecing the serious but blinded student body, I would say to you - "fleece back". Unless you are born into this Ustad/Pandits family where you will be privy to all the inner secrets of that particular gharana and the percs within, you will forever remain on the back burner, be thrown the occasional bone, and a bevy of other mixed metaphores! If you started with the Ustad/Pandit at age three, were genetically encoded with the talent genes to cash in on the program of years and years of practice and had the drive and discipline to most efficiently and effectively develop your skills as a performing artist, you could most likely make it under the presently prescribed learning regimen. There is also the socio/political stigma to contend with if you are considering a career in this field. That's another topic, though.
Under the present circumstanses as you describe, I would hunt down any and all info regarding sitar, it's history, it's performance quirks and all possible music you can get your ears on. Beg. Borrow. Steal. Barter. Whatever! Get this music in your ears, your head and your heart. Times a wastin'.
As a coffee house grade sitarist, I'm content. I play too many other instruments to polish my chops on any one single instrument. That tactic kept me employed through the disco era, the first OPEC shot, drum machines and the rise of the cursed DJ and rap.
I can more directly relate to your situation as a sitar builder/technician. I learnt those chops watching my Dad as a child growing up, hanging out in the woodshop in high school, hanging out for days at a time in all the music workshops in India, and all the time experimenting and teaching myself. The process continues to this day. After my eventual death, I'll probably cut down my "riyaz" to 1/2 time!!!
Jeeez, I can ramble! Anyway, the point here is to most definately get any and all the info you can by any means open to you. I acknowledge your efforts and wish you much success. Cheers!

__________________
http://www.karaseksound.com/
0
povster

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,474
Reply with quote  #10 
Under the present circumstanses as you describe, I would hunt down any and all info regarding sitar, it's history, it's performance quirks and all possible music you can get your ears on. Beg. Borrow. Steal. Barter. Whatever! Get this music in your ears, your head and your heart. Times a wastin'.


Now THAT is a bite that is gonna take more than a few chews but is delicious none the less! Cheers, Mr. T!!!!!

__________________
...Michael
Dasani - the official bottled water of ICM
Panini - the official bread of ICM
0
adunc069

Registered:
Posts: 316
Reply with quote  #11 
there was a puja for Ustadji last year, and he made us play before in duos, trios, solo and all he said was, "you remember what i showed you, now play" Some pleople mae up their own tans and improvised too and it was fun. But I think Ustadji was trynig to get the point of go and swim on your own and see what you can do with what I taught you. I totally use Ustadji's tans as models for tans in other rags. Like he showed a whole bunch of cool tihais in gord sarang, and then I take those models and put them into lets ay Gauati. I was just asking a simple question. I don't feel bad about transcribing the stuff. Like Ustadji said, if you can hear it, you'll get it.
__________________
Sadaqat chup nahi sakti banawat ke usolon
se, Ki khushbu a nahi sakti kabhi kaghez ke phoolon se
0
rex@sitar.co.za

Registered:
Posts: 675
Reply with quote  #12 
Amen, Tony!! And, as a "coffee house grade" sitarist myself (no kidding, I've played in more than a few!) I appreciate the perspective. None of us on this on this forum will ever have careers as professional sitarists, at least not as virtuosos. There are weddings, social gatherings and marketing events requiring "light Indian music," the odd fusion band that wants an exotic flavour to a couple of tracks and the occaisonal flamenco dancer who is bored with her guitar player. And, of course, many, many coffee houses. (For any of those wondering, I've just described my own "career" here!) The market is just too small and is saturated with a tiny number of superb players who've been playing since before they were born, for any of us, no matter how good, to ever make the slightest dent. So, do it because you love it, and don't be afraid to find inspiration wherever and however you can... make the music yours. You'll surprise yourself, and maybe a few other people as well
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.