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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #16 
Good point Barend.
I am only speaking from the player's point of view.
I bet there is not a huge difference when listening from the front of the instrument.

For a player the benefits are in the Stereo effect that envelopes the player more, and in how the player feels the tone of the instrument.
The bass strings are rounder.
It makes playing the sitar more enjoyable in terms of overall sound.

As for the audience, who knows.
That could be checked using microphones to record the sound and see if the difference is obvious.
My hunch is that it would not make a big difference to the listener, unless you are sitting with your back to the wall and some of that extra sound can bounce off the wall back towards the audience.
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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #17 
cwroyds
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Hamletsghost

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Reply with quote  #18 
OK you knew the ol' sound dude couldn't let this topic pass.
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I'm sure that you are quite correct, though, in that someone in front of you may not hear the back-side of the tumba, but perhaps the overall instrument, yes. I guess an easy test, is to mic both ends and then take one away, which I can't do anymore without the transducers and some meters.
AH HAAAAaaaaaaa Ohm Guy you win the big cigar.
Someone in front MAY not hear the exact sounds the sitarist hears from the upper but aural sensation is a hard thing to pin down. As has been mentioned the benefit to the player is great. You "feel" more of the sound penetrating your body. You "hear" more than the person in front of you -UNLESS - as has been pointed out - Your back is aginst the wall - literally. At a home show when setting up the artist I always make sure there is a nice wall behind the player who uses an upper toomba. (a corner is better as it directs even more of the sound toward the audience - just like a large horn loaded system - but then you have to have the right room visually to make it work - it IS a show after all). I have miced up the upper toomba in the past at larger events. The results I leave to the audience. The sound I hear when pulling the extra mic out of the mix definately changes the dynamics of the overall mix. It takes a little of the body and overall sparkle out of the mix - BUT - I have not used the extra mic when time or other constraints don't leave me the luxury of a PROPER sound check, and gotten an equally pleasant and full sound or when micing a sitar without an upper. It also changes if you have a jugalbhandi adding say a veena, violin, bansuri etc. it would definately preclude micing the upper toomba. Same with fusion. And you don't need a measuring device - etc. - Use your ears and an extra mic. listen to someone playing with and without that mic & you will hear the differance very easily. But as stated above - you can get great results for your performance without the extra mic.
If you are going into the studio DEFINATELY try a track with & without you could be amazed.

So I leave it to you - there ARE benefits - and I TRUELY believe that a sitar made with an upper definately benefits from the addition and it should be used because even if it is not miced it adds mass to the instrument that would affect the sonic transmission even when using just a single mic or transducer.
But thats just my 2 roops I could be wrong. :wink:

Hamletsghost 8)

PS: I HAVE thought a LOT about trying a really good wireless sax mic clipped to the upper like an AMT or other REALLY light weight high end mini. But just haven't run into the right situation yet. If it ever happens I will report back - or perhaps an enterprising player here could give it a go.

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