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Stuti

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Greetings, I recently bought a DVD giving instruction on how to play rag yaman. In the video I observed the instructor showing two ways to play a passage of notes. One way was to meend the sequence of notes the other was to fret the same sequence of notes. So my question is does it really matter if one plays a raga with fewer meends or no meends at all. I'm sure the instructor didn't have this idea in mind when he made the video but my western mind is just curious being music in the west is primarily straight forward. Thanks.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #2 
Actually you can play the same phrase on the sitar in many different ways.
You can use all meend, no meend, half of the notes with meend, or anything in between.
It is almost a game to see how you can play a phrase differently each time.
You can also add ornaments to your liking.
This is how Sitar gets its variety in the sounds of phrases.
There is no rule.
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trippy monkey

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To play continuous staccatto is NOT Indian music.

ICM gets its beauty from the way its notes integrate with each other & this includes many types of forward & backward meends as well as other gamaks or finger movements.

This is what gives it its THREE dimensions due to it being a decorated, linear melody form & not from combining many notes as in a chord. See other thread about chords on sitar.

There sems to be very little use of the bits 'inbetween' the pure notes in western music as a rule but Indian music is the total opposite. 8) 8)

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arthur

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Just curious....which DVD?

Good to see another NYer. I'm just north of you in White Plains.
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mattm312

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Reply with quote  #5 
Theoretically speaking, the Indian instrumental idiom (sitar music) replicates the voice, and the voice cannot produce separate notes without stopping phonation--even in Western opera and bel canto, notes are connected with short, fast portamentos. It's just the way the vocal chords work. As a result, meends are natural to the voice, and sitar technique generally reflects this, especially Imdadkhani Gharana and their gayaki ang.

However, it's obviously very difficult to connect and meend every note on the sitar, especially fast notes.
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Stuti

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you everyone you have given me some important insights. Arthur E-mail me at Myspirit729@aol.com lets share info.
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Neal

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "arthur"
Just curious....which DVD?

Good to see another NYer. I'm just north of you in White Plains.
Arthur,
My guess is ...http://www.raincitymusic.com/sitar%20dvd.htm
Great DVD. Recommended. Keep them coming Lars!
Neal
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Stuti

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Reply with quote  #8 
Yes, the one from Rain City taught by Indrajit Banerjee.
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Mulamoodan

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "cwroyds"
Actually you can play the same phrase on the sitar in many different ways.
You can use all meend, no meend, half of the notes with meend, or anything in between.
It is almost a game to see how you can play a phrase differently each time.
You can also add ornaments to your liking.
This is how Sitar gets its variety in the sounds of phrases.
There is no rule.
Getting back to the topic, I am trying to figure this out myself. The conclusion I reached after lot of brainstorming was..
"There is a simple rule regarding this.."

Accepting that vocal music is the basis for Indian Classical instrumentation, when you sing it, if you tend to put a vocal meend, you play an instrumental meend. Where you would pronounce a syllable, play on fret. That would sound most gayaki.

But cwroyds' comment is not completely out of order, if you are playing pure tantrakari.

More insights? I am willing to learn..
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haldamos

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Reply with quote  #10 
Mulamoodan

If you are playing a vocal bandish then a rule might be, "one word, one stroke". Check out this the first 5 minutes of this clip, I think it fleshes out nicely what you and Cwroyds started to talk about.



PH

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Mulamoodan

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Reply with quote  #11 
Oops.. "One word, one stroke - no matter what happens"
- That is the rule. Thank you, H.

I also noticed my 'one syllable, one stroke' principle tends to overcrowd the notes.
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