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TablaBeatz

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Reply with quote  #1 
Obviously tabla is a Hard instrument to learn masterfully -

But how hard is it?

Is it in a category of Hard instruments?
Or is it 'one of the hardest'?

I used to learn the piano - you can learn a scale - or a compositions - and after a lot of effort - you can pretty much or close to replicate a professional

If you hit the A key - you play an A sound in piano

This is not possible with tabla.
I can practice a composition all I like - but I won't get anywhere near anindoji and Zakirji playing the same composition
I can't bring in bayan inflections like they do for example (ie very hard to master)
Tabla can be played at infinite speeds - i can be no where near like them (traditionally hard instruments like piano - speed is rarely of necessity)
I can't hit the 'Na' key or 'tirkit' key and make it sound like a professional


Yet - tabla just has only a few main bols (ge Na tete ke tin tun and combinations there off)
Yet piano has 80+ keys - and all kinds of scales and note combinations


So what's going on here? Is there a case for tabla to be the hardest instrument to learn? Please discuss and debate !!

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Greg

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yup, it's just plain hard...
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va4leo

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Reply with quote  #3 
I also learnt the Piano, and "play" the harmonium. I have come to the conclusion that it is a purely rhythm based instrument. You see, you hit a certain key, for a certain length of time to start with, then you add more key combinations. There is no manipulation of pitch. The tabla involves a lot of pitch manipulation and speed, it is almost like combining a fretless instrument and a percussion instrument!!
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fdf

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Reply with quote  #4 
There are some instruments where obtaining a note is much easier than others.
A note on the piano is easy. You either play it right or wrong; you can’t play it half wrong or half right.
Under that point of view a note on a guitar is more difficult, for that very reason.
A violin is even more difficult, being fretless. A note on a sarangi is very difficult!
A clear bol on the tabla is very, very, very hard.

But apart from being able to play a clean note there are other factors that determine how hard is an instrument to play.
I can’t say that the tabla is more difficult than a guitar, but I can surely say that a decent level of tabla need more years than a barely decent level on other instruments.
But I don’t think that one is more difficult than the other.
One thing I can say about the tabla is that it is a wonderful yet frustrating instrument to learn.
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nkodikal

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Reply with quote  #5 
I found the guitar harder than tabla. My guess is, the sitar must be even harder than the guitar. In general IMO string instruments (plucked or bow driven) must be the hardest to gain mastery over.
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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "TablaBeatz"
Obviously tabla is a Hard instrument to learn masterfully -

But how hard is it?

Is it in a category of Hard instruments?
Or is it 'one of the hardest'?

Yet - tabla just has only a few main bols (ge Na tete ke tin tun and combinations there off)
Yet piano has 80+ keys - and all kinds of scales and note combinations

So what's going on here? Is there a case for tabla to be the hardest instrument to learn? Please discuss and debate !!

That's really a very hard question to answer because it's partly relative to innate abilities which are unevenly distributed unfortunately, so that what might be relatively easy for one won't be so easy for another. Moreover, in addition to certain accidents of birth being relevant, there are also accidents that become relevant. For example consider this Brazilian pianist ...
Quote:
Brazil's star pianist, the amazing Joao Carlos Martins, plays Bach using the thumb of his right hand and two fingers on his left. All at Carnegie Hall.


... Bach on 3 fingers.

(the accident was actually a mugging ... followed by some unsuccessful operations on his hands).

(How that answers your question I have no clue! But it's interesting nonetheless!)


Pascal

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My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
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TablaBeatz

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Reply with quote  #7 
@Pascal - interesting video - I don't know where you find this stuff
- the gentleman can play piano so well with 3 fingers ! Amazing!

Now you talk about innate abilities - and gifts people are born with -
My belief is that practice and effort can EASILY overcome any natural talent or gift that you may not be born with - but I am not too sure about the scientific research on this topic

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"The beginning of life is rhythm. When you’re in the womb your mother’s heart is beating at (about 90) decibels ... we were born of vibration 13.7 billion years ago with the explosion of the universe."
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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "TablaBeatz"
@Pascal - interesting video - I don't know where you find this stuff
- the gentleman can play piano so well with 3 fingers ! Amazing!

Now you talk about innate abilities - and gifts people are born with -
My belief is that practice and effort can EASILY overcome any natural talent or gift that you may not be born with - but I am not too sure about the scientific research on this topic
Opinions are divided on this. Daniel Coyle wrote a well known book called "The Talent Code: Greatness Isn't Born. It's Grown. Here's How." which became a NY times bestseller, and every discussion more or less start with his book, but certainly should not end there. Part of the book is excerpted at google books ...

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Talent_Code.html?id=gIHSN-ht0xQC

He uses scientific research but he seems to have an axe to grind (i.e. against innate abilities) and may interpret things to suit his overarching theory.

He does have many useful things to say, especially about *practice* and what he calls *deep practice*. It's worth having a look on google books.


Pascal

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My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
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