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Bakersbites786

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Reply with quote  #1 
What is used to clean frets? Does brasso work, I've got little hammer tap marks, will wet n dry sandpaper work, fine grade.

Thanks.
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mayer141

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Reply with quote  #2 
I use a combination of industrial strength weedkiller, Bats blood, ground Unicorn bone and a blow torch.
Or you could just use wire wool.
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Bakersbites786

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Reply with quote  #3 
Some Ahmed Hyderabadi pickle too,
Thanks pal.
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CarbonSitars

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Reply with quote  #4 
If you are talking dents, then the fret must be crowned with the proper files. Once that is done, the surface can be sanded starting with 320 grit sandpaper, working up to 2000 grit. Once sanding is completed, auto rubbing compound can be used to polish. If you are only wanting to clean, you can use just the rubbing compound with a soft cloth. Brasso works fine too. I wouldn't recommend steel wool, as the steel fiber tends to break off into tiny pieces and always manages to work themselves into all the cracks and crevices, which can later rust and damage the instrument's finish and cause further oxidation and pitting on the surface of the frets.
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #5 
Look at the frets of 99.99% of all sitars made in India. You'll see vise clamp marks on the sides of the frets and metal hammer marks on the top and bottom of the frets. In production, this could easily me remedied by using a hard rubber mallet and any kind of plywood liner pieces in the vise while bending the frets. Why this simple step in production is not used there is a mystery to me. Anyway, cleaning chewed up frets takes time and touch. Our Carbon Unit Maestro has described the cleanup operation very well. I've used jewels and spark plug files to get the reeeel nasty stuff off. A Dremel tool with a buffing wheel is the next step. Wet sanding to #2000 brings the surface up nicely. Brasso or similar is the final step with a final wash using Windex and a paper towel. Best metal polish I've found is this stuff called POR-15. While you've got the frets off, hit the fret slots with a mini hack saw to smooth and round them. This greatly reduces any chance of the threads getting cut and allows a tight pull while putting on the threads.
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Bakersbites786

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks guys, you've cracked it.
Mostly all of my Miraj sitar have this problem, I think when they ties the fret they knock it with a hammer to to adjust height. It's usually ok with their set up, but I reposition the strings according to my hand positioning, which means I move the strings closer torwards chickari end. I'm finding most of the hammer knocks occur their. pain in rear in all honesty. I've landed a sanjay Rikki ram and his are prefect all the way through.
Hats off too guys who are building sitars with perfection.
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CarbonSitars

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Sitarfixer"
Look at the frets of 99.99% of all sitars made in India. You'll see vise clamp marks on the sides of the frets and metal hammer marks on the top and bottom of the frets. In production, this could easily me remedied by using a hard rubber mallet and any kind of plywood liner pieces in the vise while bending the frets. Why this simple step in production is not used there is a mystery to me
This has always bothered me, which is why I had a special die made to make them. They have tolerances of ~0.003". Plus, who wants to spend all day hammering away? Most sets I've seen look like a game of telephone if you hold up the first and last next to each other. But those kind of differences are necessary to prevent buzzing when dealing with a much wider set of tolerances, so I don't blame them.

I second the Dremel if you've got one. It'll make quick(er) work of polishing the whole set. I've never tried the Windex trick; I bet it gets them squeaky clean!
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #8 
p
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povster

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Bakersbites786"
What is used to clean frets? Does brasso work, I've got little hammer tap marks, will wet n dry sandpaper work, fine grade.

Thanks.
A WORD OF CAUTION - If you are planning to remove the frets make sure you keep them in the same order, as the height is graduated along the length of the neck. So don't take them all of at once and just start working them or you'll have the unenviable task of resorting them in the proper order..

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Bakersbites786

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thank u so much for your replies.
It is been really useful to learn, the care that should be taken doing such work. Dremel is now on my shopping list. I shall engrave numbers on frets for when I do remove them, thanks povster for the tip.
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