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Blind Lemon Mike

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Reply with quote  #1 

Dear Experts, 

I want to get into Jawari-Work. Since there seem so be few enough experts in this field in Europe , I will now set out to be one of them by the year 2040 [wink] [wink] 

Seriously, I feel it's neccessary to learn that skill, since you cannot really rely on anyone to do it here. So i ask you: 

1. Do you do your own jawari or do you always bring your instrument to someone

2. Whats your method? What tools do you use, chisel, file, razorblade?

3. Can you discribe the process? Do you make pencil markings? By look or feel only? 

4. Did you learn it on a Instrument where it does not matter so much or did you just try on your main Sitar? 

5. What are the best writte/video/whatever/ resources about this topic? 

6. Whats the science behing this. Would it help to plot soundsamples in a Spectrum-Analyser  and see how the overtones change? Is Jawari 3D-Printin available in the near Future ? Or is it an oldchool "art" not a "craft"

7. How much time do I have to plan on desperatly crying, throwing the tabla-hammer around, and pulling my hair out? 

let me know... 

regards 

Michael

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westsea

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Reply with quote  #2 
Here is an essential document:
http://www.rudraveena.org/marcotty/jawari/Djovari_Giving_Life_to_the_Sitar_by_Thomas_Marcotty.docx
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Blind Lemon Mike

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@westsea thank you, i already stumbled upon this. It is helpful to clarify the basics but I don't really think you can do i after reading this, obviously . I also read the discription in Manfred Junius Book. Same thing here. While theoretically the concept becomes clear, it's not really in depth practical advise... 

therefore I was hoping for a bit more resonance with this thread. Is it because most of you don't do jawari yourselfes or maybe want to keep your secrets?

regards

Michael
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Lemon Mike
@westsea thank you, i already stumbled upon this. It is helpful to clarify the basics but I don't really think you can do i after reading this, obviously . I also read the discription in Manfred Junius Book. Same thing here. While theoretically the concept becomes clear, it's not really in depth practical advise... 

therefore I was hoping for a bit more resonance with this thread. Is it because most of you don't do jawari yourselfes or maybe want to keep your secrets?

regards

Michael


The Junius book is handy for understanding the concepts and applies to a new bridge. Have had a number of sitars here to fix after reading that article. Most people new to doing it file way too much and unevenly. The Junius book also written during a time when the tablis were flatter so it's more of a Kanai Lal style jawari which wasn't as productive for sustain and prolonged meend.

The art of jawari has been mystified into some unobtainable skill given to the very few. The fact however is you just need some intuition and LOTS of practice. The best way to learn is to practice, no one can teach you in the linear way you are seeking with guaranteed results. Each instrument can be a little different.

Most 'jawari' jobs are simple cleanups. You follow the existing curve without altering it until any grooves or wear marks are gone. This is why some of the more well-known folks will have you leave your sitar and pick up later. So you don't see that it only took 10 minutes for your $300 jawari. If having your jawari work done it's always a good idea to be there if possible so you can play during the various stages until it's sounding how you want it to. The results will also depend on the quality of the sitar itself, the thicknesses and tuning of the body, etc.

The best people at jawari have generally played well, very few exceptions.

Some use files, others chisels, sandpaper, dremel tool, etc. I know one person who does it on a belt sander. What matters is the sound, if you look at a Barun Ray bridge it's can often look like the moon landing with valleys of chisel marks, etc. But he's good at it and they sound good. Others are symmetrical and smooth as glass and also sound good. The original Hiren Roy did a very nice jawari in gol style. Radha Krishna Sharma (before the factory production) also did a nice open jawari.

From viewing the bridges and molding them from different folks over the years I suspect some are using a template as the shapes tend to be the same on every bridge. I know a local player who did this using a piece of a very large pipe and glueing sandpaper to it to make the parabolic curve. With some experimenting you could do the same possibly.

Closed jawari is the easiest to do, open is the hardest. A good full jawari job will take the better part of a day, especially open or gol (round).

Get a good bridge that you like that's perfect, have a replica made or make another using it as a template. That's a good way to start. Keep the string action on the higher side at first in case you want to change the curve. Notice how the sound changes over the different octaves related to what you've done. Check all 5 notes meend on each fret as well.

Repeat the process maybe 50 times and you'll start to get the hang of it. I learned it because I had to once I realized that only a few in India were good at it. I'd be getting instruments from Barun with 15mm action and have to lower them of course which would change everything. It has always been this way though, a good jawari takes time and few are willing to spend a day or two to get it right unless you are Ravi Shankar ordering it. Some musicians do their own.

For fun I asked Naushad Sitarmaker once how he would teach jawari and he held out a file and leaned it back and said 'closed'. Then he decreased the angle and said 'round' . Then he held it flat and said 'open'. Took about 15 seconds.

Practice

Lars








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Blind Lemon Mike

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hey Lars, 

thank you for that great and detailed Answer. 

I noticed that the Jawari on my Sitar was always very even and smooth. The bridge i have now, which my teacher did, is indeed "all over the place" but sounds good. He said he coul make it even but since only wha is under the string counts, he does no really care for that... He uses a razorblade. He also does lay out the basic shape by putting the bridge on a piece of paper an lining out its basic form...making a template so to say....

He also said, the surface where the string seems to in contact with the bridge is just as important, since the pressure the string applies to the bridge there changes the vibration of the string on the surface where the main jawari-thing is happenind. Hope understand this discription.

300 Dollar seems absolutely insane to me. My "guy" here did it for 50 and he is quite well known for it. Especially since a horn-bridge seems to start wearing within 3-4 Weeks, or even less.

The thing is indeed, that i cannot yet file evenly.. How do you control for that. Do you always just check the sound or can you also see it? Does making pencil marks help with that, so that you know where you have been already and get an approximation of how much took away.?

Also, do you also work with the legs, tilting the wohle Bridge a few degrees? 

And how do you determine the bridges place on the Tabli for perfect sound. With this you have to keep in mind the fret-movement to be able to gget all komal notes of course. Since moving the bridge also changes Jawari, how can you even determine the best position for it, or does it not change much at all.

I think the best thing would be to have sitar so practice on, because i don't have time to always change bridges.

Is Tanpura Jawari always conceptually depdendent on strings or could you just do it as is is, like with instrumental Tanpuras? 

thank you very much 
Michael
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westsea

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Reply with quote  #6 
Everybody has their own style.
Here's one...
http://rudraveena.org/video/Jawari.mp4
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Blind Lemon Mike

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Reply with quote  #7 
@westsea thank you very much, I didn't know about this video. Seems very helpful indeed.....

kind regards Michael
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