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quintetuk

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Reply with quote  #1 
Any advice on Teak wood sitars compared to tun woo sitars.

is teak wood of superior quality?

Regards

Mohan
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi quintetuk
Intriguing name, care to eleborate? QUINTET UK????
Anyway...

A toon/tun wood sitar is generally lighter in weight than a teak so it tends to resonate quicker/better as a new instrument. It's much cheaper than teak but maybe not as strong. Most sitars are made from kinds of tun wood.

Teak has, as it's a very oily wood, to be dried out quite well or seasoned if you like. 'Young' teak is a yellow & pale colour which, as the decades roll by, turns black.
My teakwood Naskar's is to all intents & purposes pretty black now. Old & seasoned teakwood is much sought after here in India to make instruments from.

As long as Teak wood is seasoned well it'll be longer lasting & more durable than tun wood, I think. Far less prone to neck warping or bending.

Nick
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #3 
Also teak and tun instruments have different tones in general.
A tun instrument tends to have a nice round woody tone.
A teak instrument tends to have a brighter tone.

I have three teak sitars.
They all have a bright tone.
I like the tun sound too, but for me I like the bite of a teak instrument.

Teak is much more structurally strong than tun.
A teak instrument can last decades longer than a tun instrument.
BUT because of the nature of teak it can take much longer to break on in.
Sitars break in over time and "bloom".

Tun instruments are easier to break in.
They tend to sound much better right from the start.

The problem with buying a NEW teak sitar is that good teak is almost impossible to find.
All of the celebrated vintage teak sitars were made from incredible old Burma teak.
You just cant get that quality of teak anymore.
I love teak sitars, but if I bought a new one I would probably go with a good tun sitar.
Occasionally a sitar today is made from a piece of old Burma teak reclaimed from an old palace cabinet door etc, but it is rare.
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Mushroom

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Reply with quote  #4 
First post, and I'm impressed by the good answers I read here and there throughout this forum.

I bought an electric sitar about a couple of months ago but I had to get rid of it because I had a lot of problems with the instrument's output. Now, I'm about to make an upgrade and I found a beautiful teak wood electric sitar. I'm a beginner and still wondering. Just asking, but is there anything special I should know about a teak wood electric sitar? Flat sitars with good transducers sound great, but is there anything special when dealing with teak wood?

Thank you very much!

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"Human beings, vegetables, or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper.”-Albert Einstein
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chefothefuture

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Reply with quote  #5 
I love my teak sitars. Two are "younger" teak, but you wouldn't know it from their tone (That's why I bought both LOL!).
My other is very well seasoned and sounds amazing. They all have a chime to their tone that my tun sitars lack.

Regarding an electric teak sitar. The tone will also be affected, but if the transducer is poor the teak tone might be lost.
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yussef ali k

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi, all.

Not sure it's common: Seen one w/Tun tabli, Teak neck.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "yussef
Hi, all.

Not sure it's common: Seen one w/Tun tabli, Teak neck.
Strikes me as perhaps a good combination...soundboard of a slightly lighter, more resonant wood, neck of a stronger, denser wood...strength where you need it most. But I'm not a woodworker, just opining!
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #8 
On my 2010 visit to India, in Varanasi there were several sitars being restored. One was actually pulled completely apart & had a teak neck but toon tabli. Perfect combination?

I think I ended up sending it to Australia. Lovely sound as it must have been at least 30-40 years old.

Nick
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Mushroom

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hey you trippers out there! Is there a way of aging teak wood? I know we can't make time run faster, but are there special conditions that will make teak wood evolve as if it was older?
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"Human beings, vegetables, or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper.”-Albert Einstein
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TCPerez

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Mushroom"
Hey you trippers out there! Is there a way of aging teak wood? I know we can't make time run faster, but are there special conditions that will make teak wood evolve as if it was older?
In a word... No.
Many guitar companies (including Gibson) "bake" their woods in a kiln to simulate the drying effects of aging, but you'll find no such thing in a sitar workshop (personally I don't think this makes much of a differance anyway, as its no substitute for real aging)
However I think you may be fixating too much on the wood. Quality of build is more important than species of wood (assuming your instrument isn't made out of 2x4) :wink:
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sitar_shahidaliss

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Reply with quote  #11 
dear fraind teak wood sitar sound is sweet from starting ....
but tun wood sound is little metallic in starting after some year become sweet ..
its depend on u which kind sound u want... teak wood sitar making is difficult then tune wood that's why teak sitar
is expensive also .....shahid
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