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Dspeck

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Reply with quote  #16 
Remove the string, then carefully losen the eyelet (use a pin or small nail) and rotate it a little, then put the string back. The string will now run over an unused part of the eyelet and this part is solved.

Attention: Unless you are familiar with such operations, you't rather ask a lute maker or even a sitar maker to do this for you. I have done it witout any trouble but perhaps I was lucky.

As for lifting the eyelet if it has slipped a bit inside the neck, I had the same trouble but even a lute maker couldn't help. He wanted to support it with some glue from underneath but then decided that this support wouldn't last. On my sitar, that eyelet has no rim while all other eyelets have one, which probably keeps them in their positions.
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Originally Posted by "barend"
question for Tony or anyone else:

On one of my sitars the highest taraf string has a very low action compared to my other taraf strings. Therefore the highest taraf is very hard to strum. I always miss it when I do the cascade.

I also noticed it has cut through the eyelet. But it was also low before that. How can I raise the string or raise the eyelet?
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barend

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Reply with quote  #17 
Is it also possible to glue some small piece of bone right before the eyelet, just before the string goes in? In that way you raise the string...not sure if it will work
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #18 
If the original eyelet can be salvaged, you can run a test mock up with a piece of a coke can or little bit of aluminum. Cut of a small piece with a scissors and wedge it into the eyelet so that the string will lay over it. If the string height issue is resolved, go ahead and try the lift and rotate trick described above. If that eyelet is still keeping the string too low then you'll need to replace it with a tall boy. Another but rather ugly and permanent option is to install a second bridge post like the Rikhi Ram sitars have. This will solve the problem with overkill.
Is the eyelet pushed in too far ? ? ? Seems that is the problem you describe. A larger replacement eyelet might solve the problem as it would sit in its hole higher than the current resident.

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barend

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Reply with quote  #19 
I have removed the eyelet because it was broken. Today I tried to put a new eyelet in. It is very hard to get the eyelet in shape of the hole. It is hard to handle to that small thing and the get a grip for sanding it into shape. And before you know it is broken or the sides are to small and the string will cut through it right away. I am little scared to drill the hole in the sitar wider.
I didn't fully succeed yet. I got bored and annoyed and I will try it again tonight.

Any tips?
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #20 
Yep ! Get a reeeeely small file that has the pointy bit that would go into a handle. That pointy bit " tang" will be four sided and have a bit of a taper to it. Stick that into the hole where the new eyelet is going and twirl it around a bit. This will ream out the hole with a taper that is usually just right for the eyelet to snuggle into. If you decide to glue the new eyelet in, use wood glue, not crazy glue. Also, check the eyelet string hole for excess glue. Before the stuff dries, you can push a straightened section of a wire paper clip into new eyelets the hole to clear the glue. If you're too late here, you'll have to get a suitable sized ( and rare ) drill bit to re-open the hole. Once it's all set up, take a 1/8" - 3/16" drill bit and hand twiddle the tip of it onto the hole opening and get just a hint of a new hole started. This process rounds out the top just a bit which causes the string to go in at a bend rather than a sharp kink. Strings last much longer when set up like this. I recommend doing this on all hole type eyelets.

Bored ! ? !

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barend

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Reply with quote  #21 
Yes I was bored. I rather play then sanding down an eyelet.

I have fixed it for now. But I think my taraf bridge is a bit to high compared to my Hiren Roy. Therefor the taraf strumming is a little bit harder. There is less room for your pinky.

What is the best string height for the taraf bridge (measured where the strings leave the taraf bridge, distance to the body to strings)?
Does making the the taraf bridge lower (so filing down the legs) affect the sound of the tarafs in any way? will it sound better or worse with a lower bridge?
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Dspeck

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "barend"
Does making the the taraf bridge lower (so filing down the legs) affect the sound of the tarafs in any way? will it sound better or worse with a lower bridge?
I can give a theoretical answer only. As long as all tarafs can vibrate freely, there should be no significant change, except that they will reach the bridge at a different angle, so the jawari will have a slightly different effect. You could instead lift the bridge a little and see, if that changes much. If it doesn't, that hints to the possibility, that lowering the bridge could have a similarly low effect. But nuances of jawari change can do a lot, so nothing is guaranteed until you try. Well, this idea suggests, that the support from the taraf barrels is sharp and the angle of the string towards that doesn't change the sound either.
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barend

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Reply with quote  #23 
I have a spare taraf bridge that is lower. I think I will try to replace the other and see what happens. If it doesn't work I can always put the other one back on. I hope it is not glued.
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