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Anonymous

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Posts: 987
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi,

I want to record my tablas to include in compositions.

does anyone have any experience recording tablas?

any mic / mixing / acoustic tips would be appreciated.

At the moment I have 1 condensor mic + preamp, into the mixing desk and into the computer.
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Aanaddha

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Posts: 1,932
Reply with quote  #2 
r.,
Do a search ( above) in the archives for "recording tablas" or any other terms that may be relevant to your query. There should be lots of useful info here.

Here's one from the Jan. 2001 - June 2004 archives

http://66.139.254.145/archives/1/0028.html

A.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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Aanaddha

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Posts: 1,932
Reply with quote  #3 
Oops, the search function doesn't link to the archives (too bad ) I guess we'll have to search page by page??

Anyway, as someone else has stated, a lot depends on what you want to do with the recording, how you want it to sound, and your budget. With one mic you're only going to get a mono recording. Even so, plan to do a lot of experimenting with mic placement, gain settings, EQ, compression, mixing, reverb, etc. There's no single best method and in the end what sounds good will be up to you.

A.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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zennman

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Posts: 134
Reply with quote  #4 
From my experience, the best recording I have managed to do has been with a couple of small clip on levalier mics (omnidirectional, condensor. But remember NOT to turn on phantom power ! These mics have a power unit already in them). The ones I bought were from Radioshack and were 24 bucks a piece. I place both mics clipped on to the straps, and the condenser capsules are a few millimeters away from the skin of the tablas. You will need nice clean preamps (I use the yamaha mixing board, works very nice for me). You will get an absolute perfect frequency response from thse mics at this position. You may have to play around with the volume and position setting of the mic for the bayan cus they feedback very badly (the mic tends to pick up natural vibrations from the unstruck bayan also. It can be controlled by the distance/volume adjustment or by keeping a hand on the bayan at all times). The onvious disadvantage with this miking, is you may have hinderence playing dhre dhere, but it is a minor hassle if you can position the mic at 10'O clock position, and if you can practice a open thumbed dhere dhere. Idea is to avoid hitting the mic by making it fall in the gap between the thumb and the palm. (some people like holding the thumb close to the palm while playing dheredhere, this miking posiiton will be a definite problem then).

Also, in my opinion, cardioid condensor mics give the worst frequency reproduction of a tabla. You are better off with an omni condensor mic as long as you don't have feedback a induing setup around. I would suggest a single omni condensor mic placed inbetween the dayan and the bayan, at one feet above the skin. Stereo micking is useless as there is no real way to eliminate the bleeding of dayan in to the bayan mic and vice versa. If you use two mics, you could position them on top of one another some distance part, so the lower mic captures the subtle strokes more brilliantly.

For a studio recording, the clip on mics are by far the best method you can use. You will be blown away by the trueness of the recording, trust me.

Cheers !
~Z
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Dom

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Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #5 
Guys,

I received a Sony Minidisk in September last year as a gift. It came with Sony's stereo unidirectional condenser mic (model ECM DS70P). I use the mnidisk to record my band sessions for later analysis. As an experiment I placed the mic (which is shaped like a T piece) between my tablas and played away. The recording was so realistic that it forced me to start working on my crappy bol reproduction. The unit also picks up a suprising amount of background noise such as birds, cars passing, next door TV etc. The recording is digital and you can select CD quality recording (no compression).

The downside of this unit is that Sony are a bit funny about editing files once they have been recorded. It is possible to edit them while still on the minidisk but once transferred to your computor you cant. Also as yet I have been unable to record a CD from my computor files (Good one Sony!!).

Dom
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Aanaddha

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Posts: 1,932
Reply with quote  #6 
IMHO by far the best affordable recording device for simple stereo is still a Sony DAT recorder (my previous recorder was a Sharp MD - really nice - I'd heard about the Sony's MD's quirks and thankfully avoided them).

You can find good deals on the portable DAT's on eBay and the rack models are even less. Tapes, too, up to 120 minutes, plenty around if you buy bulk quantities. At 48,000 Hz sampling it's really a treat to listen to and someday you'll be glad you had the higher resolution when CD standard will accomodate the higher sample rates. The newer compact flash recorders are nice but they run about $800. ea and you still need a 2G card ($$) to record anything more than an hour at 48Hz.

A.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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