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BWV

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Reply with quote  #1 
Are there verses traditionally associated with particular ragas? I am thinking more of the Khalyal tradition than Drupad
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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #2 
They sing 'bandishes' (aka "cheez"), which are compositions with lyrics in taal, in a particular raag. There are traditional bandishes and more recently composed ones, so sure there are traditional bandish lyrics which are associated with particular raags. There are also bandishes which are part of gharana-specific repertoire. And some traditional bandish lyrics are sung to two or more different raags/taals. Is this what you had in mind?
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If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
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BWV

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Reply with quote  #3 
So the lyrics would be devotional in nature or ghazal poetry or something similar? In Raag Durga would the singer necessarily sing something relative to the Hindu deity the raag is named after?

Are there lyrics/bandishes in the alap or is it just free vocalization (which is what it sounds like to me) with the bandish beginning with the tabla entrance?

Also generally does the alap have a taal? Meaning say the musician has chosen teental as the tala, does he or she think of the 16 beat pattern as being in the alap at a slow tempo or is it just at the jod or gat?
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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #4 
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So the lyrics would be devotional in nature or ghazal poetry or something similar? In Raag Durga would the singer necessarily sing something relative to the Hindu deity the raag is named after?
They are hardly ever ghazal poetry. The only instances of ghazal poetry I have ever heard as the base of a khyal is a Yaman bandish in Jhaptal by Ust. Mohammad Hussain Sarahang. He uses two couplets of an Amir Khusrau ghazal with the addition of some tarana bols as the asthai and antara of the bandish. There are also taranas in which a couplet of a ghazal is sung in free time as an appendage to the actual tarana bandish. Amir Khan and Salamat and Nazakat Ali were very fond of this style of tarana. Apart from that, Ust. Amir Khan has also composed a Yaman bandish which uses a ruba'i of Amir Khusrau as the lyrics of the bandish.

The themes of the lyrics can be devotional and related to the diety in question or some other, or an Islamic theme but not necessarily; in khyals they are more usually of a romantic nature.
Quote:
Are there lyrics/bandishes in the alap or is it just free vocalization (which is what it sounds like to me) with the bandish beginning with the tabla entrance?
Alap is free vocalisation, usually in aakar or with nom tom syllables.
Quote:
Also generally does the alap have a taal? Meaning say the musician has chosen teental as the tala, does he or she think of the 16 beat pattern as being in the alap at a slow tempo or is it just at the jod or gat?
Alaap is not in tal but may contain a pulse and internal rhythm of it's own. Jod and gat are instrumental music jargon. Jod is a movement within alaap and as such, not in taal, but has a definite and distinctive pulse which is necessary for jod. Gat is the instrumental counterpart of a khyal or dhrupad cheez and is composed in taal and obviously played with percussion accompaniment.

One other thing, the musician doesn't 'choose' a taal, he chooses a composition (bandish, cheez, gat), sings or plays an alaap (or forgoes the alaap altogether), and then begins the composition. The composition, of course, is set in which ever taal it was composed in.

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If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
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