INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

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Raga_Mala

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Reply with quote  #1 
We all hate it, right?
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John

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Reply with quote  #2 
Do I detect a hint of sarcasm, sir? :wink:

I quite like the 'lighter' stuff, dhuns and what have you and even the odd full-length performance (Pandit Shivkumar Sharma & Kishan Maharaj, Charukeshi, springs to mind). I also find the techniques used to overcome the technical 'limitations' of the instrument quite interesting - such as Sri Tarun Bhattacharya's kharaj string meend.

That said, I have attended more than one performance by top name artists and found myself drifting off a bit when it all gets a bit too plinky-plonky and repetitive.

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Joseph

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Reply with quote  #3 
I like them.
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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #4 
I like the cascading-tone soundscapes of the instrument and the virtuosity of leading artists, adds a lot in certain light music settings as part of the instrumentation but just don't pretend to play full scale raga performances on them.
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If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #5 
Although I don't mind listening to it, it's one of the very few instruments I've never brought/sent back to the UK.
It's had a few Indian spices 'dropped' on it but it's not Indian, is it???

Nick
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chris thill

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Reply with quote  #6 
Isn't it originally Iranian ?
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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #7 
Kashmir but it is found all over Asian. The name is of Persian origin.
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If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
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Jhaptal

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Reply with quote  #8 
I don't tend to gravitate towards the bigger raags for Santoor, but some of the lighter forms are great on this instrument. No doubt Shivkumarji has bought this instrument to the next level and personally I feel there's a place for it in this music. Shivji's performances with Zakirji are always great fun and one of the best examples of this is http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/an-exquisite-raag-in-live/id208625064?i=208625406. Sorry but this is the best link I could find. Great performance (and development of Raag) and a perfect example of just how far the synchronistity between two musicians can be taken.
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Dspeck

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have heard some Indian and some Persian santoor music. Santoor is a cool instrument, definitely worth knowing. But so are tar, piano, irish flute, and even tuvian throat singing. It is impossible to like everything that is used to make music. A guy once told me that according to the Koran a man is allowed to have as many wives as he likes, provided that he treats every single one as well as if he was married to her only. This might be wrong, but I like the analogy, you can't appreciate a single instrument fully, if you try to know them all.

A nice example of Persian santoor:


same piece, less orchestra

or maybe not the same piece after all. It starts the same though.
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