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euphogirl353

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Reply with quote  #1 
Does anyone know how to solve the problem of slipping pegs? I bought my (new) sitar a year ago in Delhi, and currently live in upstate NY. I've tried violin peg compound and talcum powder, but neither worked.
Also, this summer I'm moving to Los Angeles. I'm worried that my sitar might warp or crack. Any suggestions would be great.
Thanks!
Tara
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CheesecakeTomek

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Reply with quote  #2 
common practice is to put a layer of wax-free chalk on the contact area of the pegs to provide friction. There is also a liquid rosin that is said to work very well. Both can be purchased from either of these sites:

http://www.sitarsetc.com
http://www.sitar-tabla.com

Cheers,
Tomek
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povster

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "CheesecakeTomek"
common practice is to put a layer of wax-free chalk on the contact area of the pegs to provide friction. There is also a liquid rosin that is said to work very well. Both can be purchased from either of these sites:

http://www.sitarsetc.com
http://www.sitar-tabla.com

Cheers,
Tomek
To expand on what Tomek said, I also like the wax-free chalk. You can also use "sidewalk chalk" - basically the same stuff and can be found in hardwrae stores or some department stores. It is what I use. If there is a sporting goods store near you ask for "call box chalk". This is again wax-free chalk used to provide friciton for some hunting calls.

An interesting side note - blackboard chalk used in schools used to be wax-free. Teachers were complaining about too much dust and some were having allergic reactions to it. So they added wax to the chalk sticks to reduce the amount of chalk dust. Unfortunately, the wax makes the chalk slippery and applying ti to a peg has the opposite of the desired effect - it makes the peg slippery.

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Jeff Whittier

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Reply with quote  #4 
Wouldn't talcum powder make it worse?
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povster

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Jeff
Wouldn't talcum powder make it worse?
Good point Jeff. i was going to mentiomn that myself. I would assume that talcum powder would make it worse as it is a slippery powder as opposed to a friction powder.

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Dasani - the official bottled water of ICM
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Jeff Whittier

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Reply with quote  #6 
Oh yeah, one other thing. I don't know what the history of your instument is, but make sure the right pegs are in the right holes. In many cases, people who don't really know how to re-string an instrument may put the pegs back in the wrong order, and they'll never fit right, which results in slippage.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #7 
That is a great point.
My Hiren Roy used to have slippy tarif pegs.
One time when I was changing strings I decided to chalk them up.
I noticed that the order was all wrong.
Each peg has marks to tell you which hole it goes in.
I rearranged the pegs to their original holes and suddenly all was right with the world.
Now they are perfect and no slippage.
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #8 
I can personally attest to the effectiveness of peg rosin, I really like it. Just got a teak sitar ready to ship and teak is always a little stubborn. Chalk works well too, not as well as liquid rosin, look for "Railroad Chalk" at your hardware store or I have it on the site also.
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TBo22

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Reply with quote  #9 
haven't tried the liquid resin, but the powder resin works nicely on my instruments. Of course, I recommend first checking to make sure that your pegs fit correctly.
I've used carpenter's plumb line chalk with good temporary results, but I found that I had to re-chalk the pegs about once a week. The resin is longer lasting.
Fine tuned my peg fittings and applied the resin 2 months ago and it has been good. When changing strings I remove the residue and re-apply.
I suppose the results may vary depending on the choice of wood used for the pegs. Some of the pegs I've worked on are more porous than others, maybe dried out too much.....or lower quality wood...

I got my powdered resin from Sitars Etc. and I expect that Lars may also supply it on his new site.

Best wishes,

Tbo
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7Fives

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Reply with quote  #10 
As Jeff pointed out, talc is not the correct choice for the pegs because it is a lubricant, whereas the chalk is an abrasive. But, to say that the pegs are not in their correct places assumes that the pegs were ever fitted to their respective peg holes. "Fitting", even in expensive instruments, starts by drilling the peg holes with a straight sided drill. Then, with the use of chalk, the peg is jammed into the peg hole and rotated. The abrasive effect of the chalk (it is hoped) reams the peg hole into a taper of sorts. Note that this method has a chance ONLY if the peg is hardwood and the peg hole (sitar neck) is softer (tun). One big drawback of this fitting concept is that the pegs are whittled out by hand and never round. By the way, the jam-and-pray method does not work with a teak instrument, because both peg and peg holes are hardwoods. The teak peg holes do not self-ream into tapers the way tun wood will do.

If the Indian method sounds like a hack, then you would be correct. Having said as much, violins rely on smooth turning pegs for regular tuning (except for the first string which has a tuner), whereas Indian instruments are often fitted with tuning beads for fine tuning. Therefore the Indian instruments can get away with a peg that grabs and is difficult to turn as long as it holds. That type of peg action is not acceptable in a violin, (and should not be acceptable to anyone playing Indian instruments either for that matter.)

So, my point is that understanding what is necessary will help in the maintenance of your instrument pegs. The desireable things are first that the pegs and peg holes be round and smooth and of the same taper. That condition will never come about with the jam-and-fit approach. Tools that are actually made for the task are necessary. Yet, how many builders of Indian instruments use these tools? Once the pieces are correct, rosin or peg dope are the best choices. In teak, you are faced with hard pegs turning in hard peg holes. Rosin is definitely needed with teak.

Finally, do not let the sitar experts give you the following lecture about the slipping pegs in your beloved teak instrument:

"Teak is an oily wood. Therefore, nothing you ever do to the pegs will make any difference at all. Everyone knows that. Here, have some more tea."

The fact is that teak is a tropical hardwood that has more oil than tun wood. But getting the pegs to work correctly is not impossible, it just takes some care and thought. And, yes, I'll have that tea now, thank you very much.

7-5s
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