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shurbahar

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello all,

I have a sitar with a tumba crack that I repaired, finished/painted, then allowed the finish to cure for 8 months. I’ve refit strings now have noticed certain ways in which I could improve it like adding a bass block, etc.

One issue I wish to address is when I play meend, the bridge shifts/slides ever so slightly, then goes back to position when the meend is relaxed. Why does this happen? The tabli too smooth/slippery? The pressure of the strings on the bridge is not enough to help the bridge stay put?

It seems that the bridge has good contact with the tabli, so, I’m wondering how to solve the slip issue.
One solution would be to anchor a very small bone peg into the table to serve as a stopper for the bridge. The other solution is to add a bit of varnish onto the feet to serve as a “glue”, keeping the bridge in place. The problem with this latter solution is that I don’t know which type of varnish is best and if it is available to me at my locality.

I thought about another solution. It is to do as the second solution, but instead of varnish, I add a bit of white glue. I was thinking that if I wanted to remove the glue later on, I could use a tamp tissue paper to melt up and clean away the glue.

What do you think? Anyone do this before? Any other suggestions. Please help.

Many thanks.
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chrisitar

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Reply with quote  #2 
I had this problem too, what i did was dilute white glue 50/50 with water and let it drip with a toothpick directly under the leg of the bridge that is closest to the foot when playing. Holds well enough and can be easily removed without harm.
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fossesitar

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Reply with quote  #3 
a few drops of hide glue will work, easily loosened with heat
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shurbahar

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Reply with quote  #4 
chrisitar, thanks for the advice. This might be the way I'll go.


fossesitar, where would I be able to get hide glue. Which trade uses it most often?
Also, when you say it is loosened with heat, how would you usually undo a join? With a hair drier or something necessarily hotter?
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fossesitar

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Hide glue (in a bottle) is available in Lowes, Home depot and my local Ace HW store, a hair dryer should work fine or if you have a local violin shop you probably can take your sitar in their for a dab of hide glue from their glue pot.

The post idea is fine also if you are a good craftsman otherwise you risk damaging the instrument. As I recall the makers in Calcutta use the varnish they finish with - a dab of that - to afix the bridge to the tabli.
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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #6 
Is your bridge making optimal contact with the table? i.e., can you see any daylight under the legs of the bridge while it is in place on the tabli? If so, this may need to be rectified before glue is applied.
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #7 
If you want to use shellac and are in North America you can use Zinsser Bullseye, you can get it in many hardware stores. Dip a flathead screwdriver tip into it, let the excess drip off a moment then touch it to the center of the leg on each side and let a couple drops run down along the leg. Not too much or it'll roll off onto the tabli and leave a mark as the tabli is shellacked on most good sitars. This is how many do it in India.

Hide glue you can find at a woodworkers store and elsewhere, I use titebond liquid hide glue comes in a brown bottle. Sticky stuff, great for wood/joint repairs.
I wouldn't use a hair dryer you could damage the finish.

Lars

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povster

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chrisitar"
I had this problem too, what i did was dilute white glue 50/50 with water and let it drip with a toothpick directly under the leg of the bridge that is closest to the foot when playing. Holds well enough and can be easily removed without harm.
I have used the 50/50 white glue and water toothpick application near 40 years now. It works very well (you don't need major adhesion) and indeed does not harm the finish, since it is water based.

I angle the sitar (put a cushion or tabla ring) so the bridge foot is about 45 degrees to the flow. Dip the toothpick in and run it along the outside edge. Capillary action will draw it under the foot. I do that a couple of times, wait a few minutes, then rotate the sitar so the opposite leg is in position. Repeat and let it stay a few minutes for the glue to setup.

If it comes time to remove the bride a gentle tap with a tool handle should dislodge it easily.

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mizrable

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Reply with quote  #9 
i used to do the 50/50 mix of glue until i discovered violin rosin does a better job and you dont get those glue bits it scrape off every time you want to un mount your bridge
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