INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
producito

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Friends
0
nicneufeld

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,564
Reply with quote  #2 
Not nearly often enough. I think my sitar went several years without a fresh set. (Ma string replaced maybe once a year) But I am an anomaly and while the instrument stayed playable and sounded decent (have to clean crud off of strings from time to time), I did a full change all the way down to each and every taraf, a few weeks ago and the difference was wonderful. Of course, it did take me the better part of an afternoon...but the sound difference was definitely there.

I also don't use any oil on my fingers and I wonder if the residue from that might crud up a string a bit sooner, possibly.
0
trippymonkey

Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #3 
Actually a very good question as this is where our sound starts.
I would say change them if they're all covered in muck BUT you can slide down them with some well worn fine sandpaper & this brings them back to life, for a while at least !!!!
I was always told to tissue wipe them after playing. If you're getting ready for a concert then I would change them a week or so before then they can stretch to their final length.

Another very important point is looking at where the strings 'meet' the bridge - goraj as crap can get there & ruin the sound - jawari.

Nick
0
JRJ

Member
Registered:
Posts: 73
Reply with quote  #4 
Not trying to hijack this thread with my question as it seems related;

Any thoughts on the use of graphite on the jawari?

As far as strings I have noticed that old strings can be brought back to life simply by playing the instrument for a while
and of course tuning it as precisely as possible.

For beginners I think changing the strings on a sitar is a small education in itself 8). But unless the sitar really needs the extra
cleaning or retrofitting I think changing the strings one at a time over a period of days is a better plan than doing it all at once.

Also someone on the forum mentioned "coconut oil" for playing, I tried that and it worked just fine but later left what seemed
like way to much residue on the strings even after wiping it down. Perhaps coconut oil is not the best(?). After that I have not been practicing with any oil :|.

jRj
*j*
.~
0
trippymonkey

Registered:
Posts: 130
Reply with quote  #5 
I ALWAYS put pencil lead or graphite under my main playing string.
It can only help lube it & stop the goraj - bridge from wearing down as quickly.

N
0
producito

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 52
Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks all
0
OM GUY

Registered:
Posts: 841
Reply with quote  #7 
Yup, I use coconut oil as well. I also use graphite ( probably toooo much )

Gunk is fairly easy to remove between string changes. A cotton ball with a dab of Brasso ( I use a product called Met-All) does the trick, just pinch the string in the middle and rub up and down. This compound also removes tarnish on the string.

If you are really brave, you can do your frets, as well. Not only does it make the string easier to meend, you'll be able to see rough spots of imperfections on your frets and 00 steel wool them out ( not a great fan of sandpaper on strings or frets).

__________________
Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!
0
rishabsyd

Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #8 
Here is a video we made on how to restring a sitar. Hope this helps anyone. It's a little late though.

__________________
http://www.musiciansmallusa.com
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.