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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #16 
Found the ingredients in the workshop; a lump of rosin and Isopropyl alcohol. You need to crush the rosin under some paper with a hammer. It dissolves into a sticky solution. 50/50 volume wise, alcohol to rosin seems to work although not all mine has dissolved yet.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #17 
I think the Liquid rosin creates a fairly uniform microscopically rough surface, that just gives the peg a little tooth as it grips the headstock.
I don't think you could get uniform coverage with a hard resin block.
With the liquid rosin, I put one or two drops right where the upper part of the peg connects with the headstock.
Then I rotate the peg holding it horizontally, as the liquid rosin works its way around the circumference of the peg, making sure all of the important surfaces of the peg are covered.
You definitely need to leave the pegs to dry overnight, but you don't have to take the strings off.
I just left the pegs slight out of the hole over night, so I could just push the pegs in the holes and tighten the strings in the morning after a light chalking.
Don't use too much chalk though. Just a light dusting all around over the rosin.
The chalk also provides grip, but also allows the rosined peg to turn more smoothly than with just rosin.

My Hiren Roy is all Teak, and when I first got it none of the pegs would stay put.
It was like the peg holes were finely oiled. (Burma Teak is a hard oily wood).
Now I have no issues with any peg, except the occasional stubborn Ma that likes to flatten itself after a nice wide meend.

I went into detail because this problem was so vexing for me that I was ecstatic to find a solution that works.
I would be afraid to pull a meend, fearing that the pegs would shoot out of the holes.
When you have confidence in your instrument you can really attack it with glee.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hehe, here I am saving my nickels for a top quality surbahar, and you all are scaring me with this talk... If I get a Hiren Roy and report on here that I want to install guitar tuners on it, I'm counting on you lads to stage an intervention...
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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Repairman77"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "cwroyds"
I tried using the rosin from my violin, but it was too hard and would just sit on the surface of the peg.
The good thing about the liquid rosin is that it kind of soaks in and really becomes part of the peg.
It is a bit sticky at first, but once it dries and you use a little chalk, it really works well.
Thanks, I'll try some; yes ordinary rosin is a bit hard.
Mike.

P.S. Liquid rosin is difficult to get in the UK but can be made by dissolving solid rosin in Isopropyl alcohol, or even Methylated spirits. Google is your friend.
Lars ought to be able to ship it to you, and you can always check Amazon.com for peg drops.

The drops don't take much to work like cwroyds already found out. I used two very small drops on my troubled pegs and ...it's a done deal.

I'd spend the money going the drop route way before I'd expose files and reamers to my babies...just the sound of my tool box drawers opening makes them all go ---> ....

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Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!
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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "cwroyds"
I think the Liquid rosin creates a fairly uniform microscopically rough surface, that just gives the peg a little tooth as it grips the headstock.
I don't think you could get uniform coverage with a hard resin block.
With the liquid rosin, I put one or two drops right where the upper part of the peg connects with the headstock.
Then I rotate the peg holding it horizontally, as the liquid rosin works its way around the circumference of the peg, making sure all of the important surfaces of the peg are covered.
You definitely need to leave the pegs to dry overnight, but you don't have to take the strings off.
I just left the pegs slight out of the hole over night, so I could just push the pegs in the holes and tighten the strings in the morning after a light chalking.
Don't use too much chalk though. Just a light dusting all around over the rosin.
The chalk also provides grip, but also allows the rosined peg to turn more smoothly than with just rosin.

My Hiren Roy is all Teak, and when I first got it none of the pegs would stay put.
It was like the peg holes were finely oiled. (Burma Teak is a hard oily wood).
Now I have no issues with any peg, except the occasional stubborn Ma that likes to flatten itself after a nice wide meend.

I went into detail because this problem was so vexing for me that I was ecstatic to find a solution that works.
I would be afraid to pull a meend, fearing that the pegs would shoot out of the holes.
When you have confidence in your instrument you can really attack it with glee.
I'm grateful for the extra detail cwroyds as I was loosing patience not being able to tune properly and having pegs pop out. Have the mixture dissolved now so will try some overnight. Will let you know how I get on.
Thanks again,
Mike.
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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #21 
OM GUY wrote...
Lars ought to be able to ship it to you, and you can always check Amazon.com for peg drops.

I checked Amazon UK and they point you to a seller; but expensive at
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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #22 
OM GUY wrote...
Lars ought to be able to ship it to you, and you can always check Amazon.com for peg drops.

I checked Amazon UK and they point you to a seller; but expensive at

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Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!
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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #23 
We chaps I tried the Liquid Rosin on 3 of the pegs and I'm amazed at how good it is. You can tune quite smoothly without those large clicks and jumps you usually get. Grips very well and the pegs do not try and pop out any more.

The rest are due to be done today. It does need several hours to dry after it's soaked into the wood. I found it easier to apply with a 1/4" course haired paintbrush than dropping it on; wash out the paintbrush in alcohol or you'll have to bin it, LOL).

I suppose if you still had trouble with a difficult peg you could also coat the inside of the peg hole as well but I didn't find that necessary.

Many thanks to cwroyds for the suggestion; he deserves a medal.

Mike.
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Surbaharplayer

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Reply with quote  #24 
Just be carefull with that stuff; over the years it will build up a lot of gunk (attracting dirt because the stickiness). There might be a reason why most players stick to chalk
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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Surbaharplayer"
Just be carefull with that stuff; over the years it will build up a lot of gunk (attracting dirt because the stickiness). There might be a reason why most players stick to chalk
Hi; I guess it can be cleaned off if it does build up gunk. Chalk just didn't work for me I'm afraid; cheap pegs I guess; think they were crafted with a machete, LOL.

I've just got it all back together; the stuff takes about 4 hours to dry. and the improvement is quite miraculous. I can tune up quite accurately without the clicks and squeaks and the tuning stays there. One tip I found was to put a little chalk on the bit coated just before the Rosin completely dried; put on with the end of the little finger. It does make the pegs a little harder to turn but that's all to the good; you soon get used to it.

Hope the tip from Cwroyds helps others who have the problem with their pegs.

Mike.
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fossesitar

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Reply with quote  #26 
Perhaps the same trophy devised for trippy (for the thread he started that had to be locked)
can be adapted for Carleton?? The "Locked Thread Liquid Rosin Trophy"?? Does this compute??
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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "fossesitar"
Perhaps the same trophy devised for trippy (for the thread he started that had to be locked)
can be adapted for Carleton?? The "Locked Thread Liquid Rosin Trophy"?? Does this compute??
Very witty, LOL.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #28 
"Locked Thread Liquid Rosin Trophy"
I would like to thank the academy for this award.
I would like to thank God, without whom this award would not be possible.
And I would like to thank my family and friends, who stuck by me through all of my Sitar Peg trials and tribulations.
:roll: 8)

Don't worry about the "build up" of rosin.
I have only had to do it ONCE a few years ago and I am still in tune and without peg jump outs.
If you have to do it again in the future, you can just carefully sand the area slightly to remove the previous layer and slightly rough up the area allowing for even better friction after the new rosin application.
Its all good.
When you are unable to tune or play your instrument without Pegs shooting out or slackening of the string, you will try just about anything.
Any downside to rosin is made up for with years of trouble free Sitar play.
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Repairman77

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Reply with quote  #29 
Exactly my sentiment. It's better to find a solution that allows it to be played, however unconventional, than to leave it in the corner of the room unplayed out of frustration. I think there may be a few sitar owners who have done this due to slipping pegs.
Mike.
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