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Kirya

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Does anybody have recommendations on what if anything can be used to polish and clean the wood surfaces on the sitar, along the main fretboard and wood carvings on the instrument?

I have read that furniture (even antique furniture) polish should not be used.

Also I have some paint that has flaked of my main tumba (gourd) and I wondered if I should try and find paint to match it or just leave it alone.

What do you use to clean the instrument and keep it clean?

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Kirya
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Hamletsghost

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I use almond oil polish. Stay away from alcohol, and solvents that may interact with the finish. Almond Gives a nice warm shine & cleans great. I also dust regularly with a soft fluffy duster and microfiber cloth for polish.

HG 8)

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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Kirya"
Does anybody have recommendations on what if anything can be used to polish and clean the wood surfaces on the sitar, along the main fretboard and wood carvings on the instrument?

I have read that furniture (even antique furniture) polish should not be used.

Also I have some paint that has flaked of my main tumba (gourd) and I wondered if I should try and find paint to match it or just leave it alone.

What do you use to clean the instrument and keep it clean?
Hi Kirya~

Probably "prevention" is they key to keeping your sitar clean! I place two shrouds on mine when I'm not playing. With all sorts of dust floating around in apartment living, this helps a great deal. For one, carpets that they use are historically cheap, most of it ending up in the air and the vacuum. I use an air filter, and you'd be surprised what is in the air here!

I've a very soft toothbrush that I use for the carvings, using paste wax sparingly with the toothbrush, and to remove the residue, I place the bristles in a dedicated white washcloth and simply remove and shine the wood.

A 1" fine paintbrush easily removes dust and stuff from the dand and under the symps. But, this brush needs to remain just for this purpose and nothing else. I have several storage bins for my sitar tools.

But... stay away from the eyelets, bridges and any of the pegs with wax or cleaners of any sort. This requires you to be extra careful when applying wax and polishes. Sparingly and prevention, I think, are the key words. If you cover your sitar, this will prevent a lot of needless work.

Another white wash-cloth is used to wipe down my strings after playing, as I always use an oil box. Any residue after the wipe-down that shows up from the strings onto the cloth tells me it's time to polish the strings from gunk build-up. At 50 bucks a pop, I want my strings to last.

As for your paint issues, I'd defer to Tony or someone who can tell you what to do in that case.

You can also type in " Sitar Factory" into your search tab on your computer and get tips from Klauss on his site.

Hoped I've helped a bit....

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cabaray

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As a general rule I'd be wary of most furniture polishes unless they specifically state that they contain No Silicone . Many of spray waxes like Pledge or products like Liquid Gold use silicone which can be a nightmare when it comes to re-polishing. The stuff is very persistent and the tiniest amount can cause craters and fisheyes in a new finish.
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Kirya

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Thanks for the suggestions. Could you name some of the specific products and brands that you use?

for paste wax and for any kind of polish. Is it possible to buy French polish

My first task is to clean up the back of the fret board. I have tried just with a soft cloth alone and it seems I am going to have to use some kind of cleaner to get some dirt off.

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Kirya
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Kirya

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Would this work for the wood surfaces as the reviews seem to suggest that it would be good - also I am looking for a smudge cleaner that does not mess up the finish for the back of the fretboard.

http://www.amazon.com/Gerlitz-GENO1-No-1-Carnauba-Guitar/dp/B000EEHJS8/ref=pd_sxp_grid_pt_0_1

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Kirya
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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Kirya"
Would this work for the wood surfaces as the reviews seem to suggest that it would be good - also I am looking for a smudge cleaner that does not mess up the finish for the back of the fretboard.

http://www.amazon.com/Gerlitz-GENO1-No-1-Carnauba-Guitar/dp/B000EEHJS8/ref=pd_sxp_grid_pt_0_1
Quite honestly, I do not use that brand, so I can't speak one way or another.

However, depending upon how gunked up the surface is, you obviously need to cut through it with something. There are numerous products out there, i.e. oil wipes, etc., that if used sparingly (just enough to do the job) and quickly, should not harm the suface.

As far as wax goes, there are tons of products, including carnauba wax at your local store, Chances are, you'll get more bang for your buck by visiting your local auto supply store.

Better yet, look up a luthier in your phone book and inquire.

French Polish is a " process". The ingredients can be purchased, but it's difficult if you've never done it.

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cabaray

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Kirya"
also I am looking for a smudge cleaner that does not mess up the finish for the back of the fretboard.
If the smudge you are referring to refuses to come off with conventional techniques then you might have to use a solvent. I'm hesitant to bring this up since it should be the last weapon in your arsenal. Naphtha is the safest solvent for shellac/ polished finishes.
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povster

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "cabaray"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Kirya"
also I am looking for a smudge cleaner that does not mess up the finish for the back of the fretboard.
If the smudge you are referring to refuses to come off with conventional techniques then you might have to use a solvent. I'm hesitant to bring this up since it should be the last weapon in your arsenal. Naphtha is the safest solvent for shellac/ polished finishes.
Naptha has the benefits of evaporating quickly and leaving no residue. But you do want lots of ventilation and keep it away from flames, sparks etc as it is quite flammable. and to wear rubber gloves as with many solvents. In my days restoring old comic books I used Naptha frequently. A fine solvent. Inexpensive, too. Often goes under the name of VM&P (Varnish Makers and Painters) Naptha. And as cabaray says, it is safe for shellac...it will not dissolve it.

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Mickey Gobes

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Reply with quote  #10 
For me, almond oil polish worked in a great way.
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Kirya

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I used these guitar products and am very pleased with the results as they do not harm the French polish in any way and also leave some kind of protective coating over the surface.

http://www.amazon.com/Gerlitz-GEWOR-The-Works-Cleaning/dp/B001P8LXDY/ref=pd_cp_MI_0

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Kirya
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