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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #16 
Wood choices - hardwood stores like Klingspor or Cook Woods have all kinds of wood types. SOmebody there might be able to advise you. Online of course ! ! ! Yep ! The legs are what the bridge stands up with. Getting them well seated is verrry important. You might consider cutting a bit of an instep into the leg bottoms like the bottoms of your feet. According to Nodu MUllick, that little bit of daylight allows the legs to breathe a bit, kinda like jawari on the legs. Cheers!
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Nicolas

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Reply with quote  #17 
.
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west11

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Reply with quote  #18 
maybe Tony might consider making a video on Jawari for the beginner - who knows it could lead to a series!
If you ever do, I will be first in line to buy it
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west11

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Reply with quote  #19 
Actually thinking about it, I realize that you could not learn how to do an expert job from a video - it would just be a "finger pointing at the moon" real skill would probably just start to say hello after your hundredth attempt
I just thought that since Manfred Junius and a couple of pages of diagrams and text is all we have in 2012 a more vivid medium like video would add to the store of knowledge.
Here in the U.K I was quoted
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Bakersbites786

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Reply with quote  #20 
Thanks to OM GUY, sitarfixer, Nichlos and West11 for making this into a little discussion.

I find jawari is, work of art and a beautiful looking sitar wouldnt be complete without a good jawari.

West11 ji try looking up Sir Dhambir Ji's son in Leicester, ive heard he does excellent jawaris.

Come on guys keep the forum alive and kicking. I think we need Lars and some of the other heavyweights back also.
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west11

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Reply with quote  #21 
Thanks Bakersbites! I will contact Dharambir-ji's son if my old Hemen doesn't wear in it's bridge after it's last expensive job.
I always wish I was in the states to benefit from the great talents of Tony Karasek as it's heartwarming to hear how his work really satisfies his customers.
How abouta thread on small length compositions for sitar? I have a load of books including some now out of print.

ps Mr Mayer (much admired) I just saw your ad for a Naskar on ebay ------- telling myself three sitars is enough...three sitars is enough.....
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Bakersbites786

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Reply with quote  #22 
Trippymonkey would be a good source for help as his in the UK also. Perhaps he know someone. My Guru ji is Sir Dhambir Singh Ji's student, so my trust in them is immense judging from my guru Ji's trust in them. I've not met them or personally know them.
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Zulu

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Reply with quote  #23 
Sitarfixer,

I am looking for meat and potatoes answers about D.I.Y. jawari…hear me out…

I have been tattooing for almost 30 years and have traveled abroad to study with some of the most world renowned tattoo masters of various tribes and cultures; most of them monks and tribal elders who practice sacred ritual tattooing.
My talents are a result of centuries of sacred ancient knowledge being passed down to me hand to mouth; the old apprentice style of learning…no videos or books; I had to dedicate my entire life to this.
In my mind there is no such thing as D.I.Y. tattooing; you MUST seek out an artist with proper training.
My question…
Is jawari the same type of art?
Is it something that should really be left to a master artist or can the average guy do it.
Personally; I can’t imagine trusting my Hiren Roy to an amateur (that amateur being myself)

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Hamletsghost

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Reply with quote  #24 
Perfect vision Zulu,
Yes - a hobbyist or player could " attempt" to make a bridge and perform a proper jawari to gain a more intimate knowledge of their instrument. Or even to just touch up a worn jawari until a real jawariwalla comes nearby. But yes would anyone truly be able to perform such an exacting work of art without the years of training trial and error? Would be like trusting someone to do a first time tatoo on someone with some ink and a straight pin or a piercing with a needle and a potato. How many of those screw ups have you seen? And would anyone really trust their precious skin to the untrained knowing the potential for disaster?

Hamletsghost 8)

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #25 
Hi, Zulu. The process of doing jawari as learned from a book or video is a brick wall. There is so much more to it than the sketchy limited introductions such publications offer. That grid pattern method in one of the available books impresses me as a bridge in need of a jawari, not a finished product. There are various methods of doing jawari with files, sand paper, chisels and other assorted weapons. I start out with a 4x30 belt sander, graduate to a Dremel tool then finally get down to sandpaper wrapped flat files, straight files and a 1/2" straight chisel. Everybody has different hands, biomechanics and all that. I've watched the wallas at Naskar use files held backwards in true Japanese tradtion. The Miraj homies use two hands like they're working a block plane. With my oversized paws, I've developed a thumb-over-bridge method with a file that gets into the "nice kitty kitty" mode. This almost metaphysical approach is the result of spending years on and off working on bridges. I've totally destroyed more than a few bridges to get to where I am now. Each bridge is different. Each day is different. Constant adjustments to so many aspects of the job must take place. Even the coffee intake must be considered. I've let many clients watch as I work on their bridges. I answer questions and explain as best I can what is going on. The general realization is that it looks easy but that's all. I've even let those interested try their hand with the process. It becomes clear very early on that the touch and techiques mandatory to get a decent result just aren't there at this introductory level. With that estabished, I get back to work and finish the job. I have to "feel" the bridge surface, look at it from many angles, stroke it, see how the light reflects off it, etc. Repeated applications with strings on and tuned eventually comes into play and a desired tone quality starts to arrive. Like your tattoo skills, it is a long dedicated thoroughly researched process. I had access to a closet classic Hiren Roy sitar years back. I stared at those bridges for hours to get that visual image of the bridge surface shape and how the strings related to that shape. Even today, that image is clear in my head. This kind of stuff is in my head constantly and with the bedside sketch pad on the ready, I continue to develop new ideas for sitar design, general improvements and "ground breaking" innovations. It's what I do. The similarities to tattoo art and many other skills seem pretty apparant to me. It's an ongoing learning process which I am continually learning and developing. I love my job ! ! !
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Zulu

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Reply with quote  #26 
Thanks Sitarfixer,

I assumed your abilities came by a lifetime of dedication.
I'll stick to skin and leave the jawari to wallas like yourself.

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Hamletsghost

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Reply with quote  #27 
Hear hear Zulu,

Excellent choice. Having had my babies been the recipient of the ministrations of the Sitarfixerwalla, yours is the wise decision.
On a related note to your post I have spent many happy hours at YOUR site and Facebook page. You sir are a true master of YOUR art and if this old man were ever to get some ink yours is the hand I would want to trust precious skin to.
I especially loved the picture of you traveling to the east.
Take care my brother and keep on loving that Hiren Roy,
I bow to both you Masters

Hamletsghost 8)

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Zulu

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Reply with quote  #28 
Hamletsghost,

Thank you for the kind words; I wish you well.

Zulu

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