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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #1 
...now that I've gotten your attention!

So I've long been enamoured by the 1969 UVK/Shankar Ghosh recording of Darbari, which I've listened to many, many times when it comes on my Pandora radio station. (As a brief aside, if anyone could point me in the right direction to get the "gat" section, I already have the alap/jor/jhalla part, and I'd love to be able to listen the rest of it, more regularly.)

But one thing I keep noticing is shuddh Ni, of all things, being used in a few phrases. The one I specifically remember is Ma, Pa, kDha, Ni, Sa. IIRC maybe in the lower saptak. But definitely a shuddh Ni! I've heard tell of an "enayatkhani kanada" variant he was fond of that added shuddh ga and shuddh ni to the ascent, but unless I've just ignored it, I don't recall shuddh ga in this one. Anyone know about this...I've listened to very few other Darbari renditions (I keep coming back to this particular one) so I wasn't sure if it was used by other musicians or just something that Khansaheb utilized, eventually branching it off as a Kanada variant named in homage of his father.

Spectacular playing, I would love to learn it someday, although from what I've read the raag tends to be reserved more for senior musicians to play so I've rather a long, long way to go before I have to worry about that.
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musicslug

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Reply with quote  #2 
in Parrikar's essay on Darbari Kanada on the SAWF site,

http://www.sawf.org/newedit/edit12112000/musicarts.asp

he includes a bit of shuddh Ni. I wrote in my notes that it can be used 'only in ascent if used' and that this is an 'innovation dating from the early 20th c.' - but I don't recall where I read that...

Daniel
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks! Parrikar certainly has a rather arresting way with words...I chuckled at this not-very-well-veiled expression of his thoughts on instrumental darbari...

"Darbari is out and out the vocalist's fief. To know and to feel it is to hear the great vocal masters. The noises made by current day dingdongers cut no ice whatsoever."

But his site is definitely a treasure trove of information! Very technical, takes slow reading and patience to digest.
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musicslug

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Reply with quote  #4 
'opinionated' doesn't begin to describe Parrikar - there are some serious jabs on the site, with favorite targets being 'hippies' and Ali Akbar Khan (but he hardly limits himself to those two...). nonetheless, a great resource (IMHO).
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #5 
Indeed! I also chuckled at the acerbic tone in this one:

"This Sitar-Surbahar duet in Chandni Kedar by Vilayat and Imrat Khan is included to pander to the maudlin sensibilities of the Vilayat acolytes."

I've heard that in India vocal music dwarfs instrumental, and that instrumental music is much more popular in the West (variety of reasons for that I'm sure), this learned gentleman seems to exemplify that preference!

I also can understand the hippie frustration. It was such a two-edged sword...on one hand, the shallow (and often fleeting) affections of Western drug-addled young people seemed to cheapen and misrepresent the grandeur of Indian music, but on the other hand, the past 50+ years of genuine Western interest has certainly done a lot of good, for musicians, instrument makers, and teachers. There are probably a lot of "hippies" I owe thanks to for guiding me to the music, starting with a certain Mr. Harrison...

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