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sitardoc

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Reply with quote  #1 
this was an experiment that had shockingly good results. as soon as you notice ANY drop in tonal richness, go gitchapiece of 1500-grit sandpaper. that's right-1500 grit. auto parts places will have it-awa ace hdwe. remove your bridge(s) and cut a piece of sandpapper roughly 1.5" square. you want it to barely hang over the working edge of your main bridge-but not so long that it hangs well off the bridge. hold the bridge firmly and lick the first two fingertips. if you then rub them against your thumb, they will become quite tacky and will guide the sandpapper quite precisely.
place the paper against the slotted end of your bridge, (this may be butt-obvious to most, but your 2 sanding fingertips MUST be perpendicular to the leading edge of either bridge.) use the curve of the bridge as a positioning guide for your fingers. sand back and forth ten times using minimal and EVEN pressure. use the oxidation marks from your ma string to tell you how far you've gone. if you're working w/delrin, the color change of the bridge will be quite noticeable. the same thing will happen with bone. you'll have to clean the paper every 5 strokes or so. a compressor does the best job of paper cleaning but a hard-bristle toothbrush will suffice.
i had noticed a marked difference as i tuned the symp's on the jawari esraj. once i got the bridge off, the problem was obvoius. bridge looked like prison bars due to oxidation. used the above method and sound improved most markedly. now the tarabs sing like they're supposed to. hope this is clear-pm if not.
-the doc :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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Jay M

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Reply with quote  #2 
Pictures would be awesome of this process! =)
Sounds like a great tip

Thanks

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mizrable

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Reply with quote  #3 
thanks doc
On another note regarding jawari preservation....Brian Godden advised me to use film under my main bridge for diri and bol practice. He said this is the most destructive type of practice because the main playing string it cutting directly into the bridge vs when pulling its planing across. I tried photo film and never could get used to it because the the sound really sucked and it was only durable enough to last a few practice sessions. I did some R&D and figured out that the interior plastic in Checkbooks really works well and gives a decent sound, its the clear stuff. there is a smooth side and a textured side I use the textured side up. I put it under the bhaj, juri, and pancham strings. You dont need to cut a piece the same width as your bridge leave some gap between the slot and the edge of the plastic so you can still hear some of the bone on the string, if you use too much it sound too plasticky ( I guess there some people out there that might like that) On my NB jawari use pieces about 1/2-1/3 the length of the bridge. You may need to play around with the placement in order to keep your intonation RS jawaris seem to require it more flush to the fret side of the bridge than NB. The cool thing about it is you dont really need to detune your strings to take it on and off. its pretty tough plastic. I leave it on my juri and pancham sometimes for week and when I practice meend and play alap I lift up on the bhaj and scoot the plastic from underneath the main string, then i fold it so its not touching the top side of the bhaj. If your drones are overpowering your main string when playing with open strokes this is a great remedy for that. I played the same bridge 3-6 hrs a day for 6 yrs now because of this.
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wilsaxo

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hey mizrable,

You might try a piece of mylar from a discarded bottom snare drum head. It is very thin and very resistant to wearing down from friction. I use it when burnishing dents out of brass instruments and it holds up nicely while subjected to a lot of pressure. I don't know about the sound but I believe it is thinner than the checkbook stuff you described.

David
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povster

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "wilsaxo"
Hey mizrable,

You might try a piece of mylar from a discarded bottom snare drum head. It is very thin and very resistant to wearing down from friction. I use it when burnishing dents out of brass instruments and it holds up nicely. I don't know about the sound but I believe it is thinner that the checkbook stuff you described.

David
I used to collect comic books and still have lots of 2 mil (pretty thin) mylar bags. It works well for this. It has a slick surface, too.

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #6 
Pandit Ravi Shankar uses this method to save the jawari. Sounds awful but for in house riyaz, it's not an issue. Drum head sections are excellent. The bottom head "resonant head" of snare or tom drums will work fine. Any music shop that sells or repairs drums would most likely be glad to give you a broken head. Just tell them what you need it for.
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #7 
save those jawari's!!
those jawari's what??

Seriously though, ANY example of jawari sound saved MUST be good!!!!

Nick
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mizrable

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Reply with quote  #8 
Tried the mylar
LOVED IT!! The sound went from shitty to just a little crappy.
thanks!
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