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saipk

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Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #1 
Why does Rupak Tal has Khali (wave) at the Sum? this is different from rest of the taals.

Another question - is there a software that I can use to build a composition as a sequence of bol strokes with vibhag etc. and set a speed and have it play for me? For example, if I can set rupak as tin tin naa | dhin naa | dhin naa and set the speed, it should just reply. this will help me compare my progress against.

Thanks!

-Sai
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Shawn

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Reply with quote  #2 
I believe that Swarshala does what you are looking for. http://www.swarsystems.com/SwarShala/
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aarenlainey

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Reply with quote  #3 
Rupak tal is a common seven beat tal in Northern India.

Rupak (7/3). It contains seven matras: it is split into three parts, the first part is of the three matras, the next two matras each. The first matra and sam is khali, while the fourth and sixth matra get a tali (clap) each. This tal is like teevra tal is not khali as follows:

Matras 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Words (bol) DHIN DHA TRIK DHIN DHIN DHA TRIK
Theka +0 2 3

Some people do the rupak tal in the following way:

Matras 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Words (bol) TIN TIN NA DHIN NA DHIN NA
Theka +0 2 3

Rupak tal may be found in almost any musical style. It is found in film songs, kheyal, gazal, instrumental pieces; virtually any north Indian form. The only forms where it is absent are the dhrupad and dhammar styles of singing; it is only absent in these styles because tivra tal serves the same function.

Rupak is unique among the tals in that the first beat ( i.e., the sam) is khali (i.e., represented by a wave of the hand).

The theka of rupak is uncomfortably similar to pashtu tal. The only difference is that many musicians prefer to think of pashtu as consisting entirely of claps; while rupak tal begins with a wave of the hand.

The form of rupak is shown below:
CLAPPING/ WAVING ARRANGEMENT:wave, 2, 3, clap, 2, clap, 2
NUMBER OF BEATS : 7
THEKA : Tin Tin Naa Dhin Naa Dhin Naa .
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rajpuranik

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Reply with quote  #4 
Saipk, I'm afraid I'm missing the point of what you want to do. Yes, there is software that will imitate standard tabla thekas at various speeds (another one is Riyazstudio - see ad in the left column), but why would you want to compare yourself to a "machine?" The machine will play everything perfectly at all speeds, but that has nothing to do with how you are playing.

Moreover, a real tabla player inevitably makes adjustments as the speed increases - that is natural. A machine won't do that - another reason not to compare yourself to a machine.

It is just a substitute tool used by other instrumentalists to keep the beat, and is not meant to be the "standard" to which to compare your own playing. This is why vocalists and instrumentalists who only played with tabla machines get very nervous when accompanied by real tabliyas.

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saipk

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Reply with quote  #5 
Raj, I agree blindly comparing with a machine might not be a good idea, but I guess I am just looking for an aid to see how a composition or a theka should sound at a different speeds or if I have bols I could use it to play for me. It's like having a Tabla player with you to play and show how a particular piece is supposed to sound. It will help me see and appreciate a rhythm, which might not be visible if I play it as a slow pace - since I am a beginner I play very slow and most of the times it's just a sequence of strokes I am hitting and can't see the beauty in the rhythm unless someone plays it at a speed it's supposed to be played. That's my view though but again I am a beginner and I might be missing a point here.
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rajpuranik

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Reply with quote  #6 
Ok, I get your point. I have practiced certain phrases from a book, only to discover that they sound totally different at the hands of an advanced player. It has to do with the expression and accents given to certain notes, etc.

I'm a bit skeptical that tabla software will really help you in that respect, however. Mostly it's intended to help keep vocalists and instrumentalists on the beat. Usually it has about as much expression as a machine would be expected to have.

This is the difficulty of learning on your own - I've tried it. I finally found an online teacher from India, and the new pace of progress is amazing. You should consider online lessons.

Regards,

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saipk

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Reply with quote  #7 
ok. I guess if the software cannot do a decent job in simulating a piece then it's no point. It might not play as good as a tabla player in real but atleast if I ask it to play keherwa for ex. it should sound like keherwa. Guess I will have to try that and see. I am fortunate to live close to David Courtneyji and am taking weekly lessons from him. This is just to supplement my practice. Having said that, I am beginning to realize that since I am a beginner, maybe I should focus on getting the basic strokes correct and not worry about appreciating and catching the rhythm just yet. Maybe once I get more comfy with playing and increase my speed (hopefully soon maybe in few months) I will gradually start seeing the beauty. I will try that software to see if they have a trial. thanks! I have spoken to a few Tabla instructors/players online on skype. I must say it's pretty impressive. I thought learning over wire would be difficult but I was able to see and hear things clearly. I think if one doesn't have the luxury of a Guruji around, it's much better to take online lessons instead of learning from a book.
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Tablaseek

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Reply with quote  #8 
I find Hindi CDs to be very useful. Just play the CD and accompany the singer.

Cheers
Tablaseek
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rajpuranik

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Reply with quote  #9 
Good point, Tablaseek. I used to do that routinely when I first started playing tabla.

Actually, I find ghazals (especially Jagjit Singh's), bhajans by ICM masters like Pt. Jasraj, and ICM recordings to be even more useful. These days, few Hindi songs use traditional Indian rhythms. These other styles, however, give you a variety of rhythms in Keharwa, Dadra, and Rupak, played in a consistent manner and long enough to be easy to accompany.

Regards,

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sanjeev.567

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Posts: 9
Reply with quote  #10 
Please take a look at this thread for a new open sourced Tabla s/w

http://forums.chandrakantha.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7460#p45765

~Sanjeev
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Chily07

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Reply with quote  #11 
I find Hindi CDs to be very useful for me too. Just play the CD and accompany the singer.
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