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Malik

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Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi Fellow Enthusiasts,

Has anyone ever replaced the leather straps on their bayan with rope and rings? (the kind used by many Benares gharana artists)

My two favorite copper bayans are due for a head replacement, and I was thinking I'd go this route instead of the more common leather straps.

I like the tunability that it affords, and it conserves the useage of animal parts.

Any opinions or thoughts would be warmly welcomed. (this will be my first pudi replacement!)

Thanks!

- Malik
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Shawn

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Posts: 330
Reply with quote  #2 
All my bayas are rope-tensioned. I much prefer this method for tensioning, as the pitch stays quite stable over changes in humidity, and it's very easy to fine-tune as needed. It's also easy on the hands when pulling.

The trickiest part, which is not really too difficult, is to make sure that the rope has a pointy end that you can easily pass through the holes in the pudi. A couple of techniques you can try - tie/tape a paper clip to the end, or with white glue, shape the end of the rope into a point and let it dry.

Does anyone else have other techniques for shaping the tip at the end of the rope?

Shawn

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Malik

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks, Shawn- that's an excellent point that I hadn't thought about. Where do you source the parts? When I get back from travelling this week, I plan on ordering the pudi. If there is a preferred vendor you have for the "tasma" and the rings, let me know!

Nice website, by the way.

Best,

Malik
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hbajpai

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Reply with quote  #4 
My thoughts...

I have done several baya's and a couple of small size daya's as well with good success.

The challenge and the suggestions that Shawn pointed out are valid.

At a materials level, there is nylon rope and rope made out of natural materials such as jute/cotton etc. and finally blended (nylon + Natural). The natural made ropes are the hardest to work with in terms of maintaining a stiff end. From a rope construct perspective, there is weaved rope, weaved rope around a solid core, interlaced rope. Once again, in terms of having a stiff end, interlaced are the easiest, solid core are next while weaved ropes are the hardest. The thickness of the rope is also important from a tension as well as aesthetics perspective.

The best rope with medium difficulty that I have found is an 1/2" interlaced, natural material rope. You can locate them typically at a 99cents store, discount liquidator stores or even Chinese markets Prices vary from a buck to 5 bucks for 50 feet. Look and ask for clothes line.

The trick I use is electrical or a duct tape that is wrapped tight and extends an inch beyond the ropes end and taped on to it self. Needle nose pliers are a must for this operation. Slide the extended tape into to the hole and then using needle nose pliers, try to grab the tape with some amount of the rope tip. You will have to dig in to get there to grab the rope. Using this process, I have never loosened the rope and maybe had to re-tape once during the process.

Don't forget the rings and check your placements of rings. It sucks when one ring is out of place and you have to undo. You can buy brass rings on line. Again thickness and diameter is important.

Finally, once you are all done with the baya, don't forget to make the classic, traditional knotted handle across the height of the baya with the left over rope. It's believed that the handle was essential so that one could hang it on the wall.

Hope this helps.
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Malik

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Posts: 30
Reply with quote  #5 
Thanks, Mr. Bajpai,

I'll be heading into Chinatown tomorrow to pick up the rope that you've recommended!

When you say to be careful of the placement of the rings, how do you thread them in? Do you leave them directly under the pudi and then lower them to tighten when you've finished threading the entire bayan?

I will try my best to make the aforementioned handle, but I can't promise any success! Even if it pans out, I probably won't be hanging up my bayan...though it would be helpful for carrying it to gigs!

Thanks,

Malik
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hbajpai

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Posts: 892
Reply with quote  #6 
What I meant was be watchful of the placement of the rings. It's easy to get distracted and place the rings incorrectly. I have not done one recently and nor do I have one in front of me right now, but going from memory I believe the way the rings are placed are:
1. Slide the rope from the top of the gajra
2. Pass rope through 1st ring
3. Pass rope from the under of the kundal
4. Pass rope through the same ring
5. Pass rope from the top of the gajra
6. Pass rope through 2nd ring
7. Pass rope from under the kundal
8. Pass rope through second ring

Repeat pattern 1-8 7 more times.

At the normal state, the rings will stay at the bottom. To increase the pitch, pull the rings up.

I am going from visual memory here so I may stand corrected.

Also, this assumes you start with the full rope/tasma i.e. the first end that is inserted from the top of gajra is pulled all the way leaving only enough to wrap over and tie the knot. In other words, this method is not for folks that pass through half of the rope/tasma, work towards the right and then using the other half work towards the left. In my method, you work in one direction and end up where you started and not the opposite side.
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Shawn

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Posts: 330
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Malik"
Thanks, Shawn- that's an excellent point that I hadn't thought about. Where do you source the parts? When I get back from travelling this week, I plan on ordering the pudi. If there is a preferred vendor you have for the "tasma" and the rings, let me know!

Nice website, by the way.
re: website, thanks!

I have always got my parts direct from tabla makers in Benares, so I'm afraid that I haven't done any research locally. I'm pretty sure that my rope is cotton, and the rings are made of steel or brass.

With hbajpai's very detailed responses, you should have all the info you need.

I wonder if Shen Flindell might have some spare parts for sale... (http://www.ethnosuperlounge.com)

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