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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #1 
In all the sarangi's I've seen and worked on, there is one particular thing that may create problems, and that is the instrument giving in to the stringtension, causing the bottom-left (in playing position) part where the strings are attached to the targahan to rise above the supposedly flat plane of the instruments' top. The strings are supposed to run parallel to the fingerboard so as to allow good fingering up and down the string. This limits the height of the bridge (ghoraj) in a proper set up. Where it all clashes is that if the bottomleft part is raised through deformation/torque, you end up having little or almost no angle of the strings over the bridge to the bottom part. Having almost no down-bearing over the bridge results in a weakening of tone, but you can't raise the bridge because it would make the string run out of parallel with the fingerboard. What I did on several occasions, before puting on a new skin, is to plane/sand down the raised part. If you lay a ruler over the fingerboard and the bottom left part you can easily check how much that part has raised, giving in to torque. Sometimes it is possible to cut a small recess in the lower part to allow the playing strings to lie deeper. As the targahan always is below the rim of the instrument where the skin is glued on and makes a square angle over this rim, if a notch is cut / filed the width of the string, it allows for more downbearing angle of the string, thus producing a better tone of the instrument.
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peeceebee

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Reply with quote  #2 
I've had good luck improving tone on the low sa string by increasing the angle the string makes over the bridge laterally, drilling a new hole so the string is anchored farther to the side of the instrument. Doesn't increase downpressure much, but gives the string more mechanical interaction with the bridge, picks up higher overtones a bit, on the low sa every bit helps...
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stringtester

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Reply with quote  #3 
I don
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi, well even if you don't find it necessary, plenty of others do, I've had lots of discussions a bout this point. I know lots of sarangiyas do not have their instruments set up as well as they could or should be, but this is one recurrent issue. I've had it explained that particularly for quick gamakas the fixed reference of the fingerboard is essential.
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pritlee

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Reply with quote  #5 
Martin

as they say a picture says a thousand words...... i am talking on behalf of all thick people like me.... any way you can post a pic of your work you are talking about please??.....if it’s not too much of an effort of course.....

thanks bud

p.s thanks very much for proactively sharing your knowledge and ideas....it is always very much appreciated and greatly received

peace

p
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stringtester

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi,
But if you play so your fingers touch the fingerboard even when you play higher tones, why
can
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #7 
Here, in the one picture, you see a yellow spiritlevel lying over the fingerboard and the bottom-left corner. Even when this instrument had been flattened before reskinning some 10 years ago and the instrument is at least 50 years old, it has moved up a bit, leaving almost no downbearing angle behind the bridge, which you can see in the other picture.
[IMG]http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/610/dsc01627sc.jpg

[IMG]http://img259.imageshack.us/img259/4016/dsc01625sd.jpg
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi,
But if you play so your fingers touch the fingerboard even when you play higher tones, why
can
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stringtester

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Reply with quote  #9 
Ok, I can understand it
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #10 
To stringtester:
It' s not that I meant that everyone should now check and do a major overhaul; I pointed out one of the many difficulties one may come across trying to get the best out of an instrument. As it is, judged by the sarangis I have seen, this particular deformation seems to occur often. If things get stacked under bridges to raise them it is not only bacause the skin has given in but also because of this particular deformation. In the picture with my instrument and the yellow spiritlevel you can see it is not quite flat anymore while it was 100% flattened before I reskinned 10 years ago, and that for a well-seasoned instrument.
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peeceebee

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Reply with quote  #11 
Ok, I can understand it
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stringtester

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Reply with quote  #12 
My instruments bottom have not moved up yet. But the strings distans to the fingerboard
is 5mm. more at playingplace for high Sa then it is at the nut. It doesn
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DrKashyap

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Reply with quote  #13 
The remedy to this is - any one of the following or varying combination of both.

1. raise the nut at upper end ( Aad ) by placing a small packing underneath it. You need to detach whole aad from the finger board & need to fix a packing ( any wood can do ) between fingerboard & bottom of the aad.
2. Loosen all the strings & cut the appropriate portion of the legs of main bridge to bring that end down.

Be very careful to do the 2nd job, as it may change the tone of sarangi & may take some time to recover it.
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stringtester

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Reply with quote  #14 
What I can understand the second job you descibe will give a more bad angle over the bridge
then the first job. So because of that reason raiseing the nut is to prefer. The string will also
be higher up from the fingerboard.
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #15 
What it all boils down to is that there is often a conflict between playability and getting a good sound out of your instrument! I did repairs on a sarangi for a friend who has very short and small nails, so the string has to sit lower for her otherwise she just can not play. This precludes a possibility to get more tone out of the instrument. Again, look at the angle the strings make over the bridge of a violin or a cello, which is more acute and is bi-sected equally back and front. With sarangi it's straight horizontal from the front, and a smal angle at the back. It doesn't help!
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