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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #1 
On Sanjoy Bandopadhyay's webpage there is a really interesting set of photos of S.M. Tagore’s Musical Instruments in the Indian Museum, Kolkata. It is really cool to see so many variations of similar instruments.

https://plus.google.com/photos/106497136422049843414/albums/5608496132445836497?banner=pwa
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chrisitar

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WOW! fascinating specimens, very curious about some of these. The wooden fretboard rabab looks more like a sursringar, which is the name of the violin body with the raised frets? I wonder if it was originally covered with the metal, wood won't sustain a note very long. The coloring of the Showktica Veena? How to hold the Tritantri veena, the body shape is weird too, isn't this the ancestor of the sitar? No way the nadeshara veena held by the ankle like violin. WEIRD STUFF MAN
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #3 
There's that one "doubleneck"....pretty wild, reminds me of the Gibson EDS-1275 so popularized by Jim Page.

I've seen the split style tuning pegs a lot on antique instruments. A crafty maker *cough*Tony*cough* might bring them back as an interesting option for modern instruments!
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David Russell Watson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chrisitar"
WOW! fascinating specimens, very curious about some of these. The wooden fretboard rabab looks more like a sursringar, which is the name of the violin body with the raised frets?
S. M. Tagore gave Sanskritic names of his own creation to some musical instruments to replace the ones in actual use for them, as well as invented names for experimental and one-off instruments, which, whatever his intention may have been for doing so, tended to give false impressions about the instruments and their histories.
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Originally Posted by "chrisitar"
How to hold the Tritantri veena, the body shape is weird too, isn't this the ancestor of the sitar?
No, this is just another novelty instrument, no doubt so named because it's a chordophone "vina" that happens to have three strings "tritantri". The tritantri vina of the sastras was more likely a tube zither, like the rudra vina, and which likewise happened to have only three strings. The idea that the ancient tritantri vina is ancestral to the sitar is based upon nothing more than the common meaning of their names, and a nationalistic aversion by some Indians to acknowledging a foreign origin for any cherished feature of their culture.

David
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DrKashyap

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Reply with quote  #5 
Amazing..
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yussef ali k

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi, all.
Thank you: Beautiful pieces these are.

Looks like SMTagore had those built and dispatched to (impress, certainly, and be seen in) the west.
Got the sense these 'princely' vinas would be state-of-the-art instruments by the 1870s: the fretting seems to had reached 16, tied old style.

Feel free to add.
Have fun.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #7 
On a similar note of old, interesting instruments, have a glance at this old photo from Ust Imrat Khan's blog:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-dgx0yj3JsTM/TYo1lBDpVEI/AAAAAAAAAD4/J1KjgdJLUVo/s1600/Imdad%2526group.jpg

2nd from left is Enayat Khan, center is Imdad Khan, 2nd from right is Wahid Khan. Note the difference in the surbahars of Enayat Khan and Wahid Khan...the latter has a wide headstock and an interesting dilruba/esraj style pegboard on the side of the neck instead of usual in-neck symp pegs. Enayat Khan's has the narrow headstock you see more on older surbahars (seems uncommon these days).
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #8 
I just love old instrument pics like these. It's so good to see just how madly inventive the ancient & NOT so ancient Indians were &, indeed, are.

Nick
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