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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #1 
This very nice Jhinjhoti is preceded by a speech where Rais Khan basically states that UVK learnt from many people who he fails to name and gracefully acknowledge, (something that is considered pretty egregious in ICM circles) including and especially RK's father who apparently taught UVK for several years. He then pretty forcefully states that UVK has copied his style rather than the other way around and that he feels dishonored that his father's contribution was not properly acknowledged by UVK, but apart from that the Jhinjhoti is RK at his best even though the flow in this performance is kind of jerky.



While this may all be true, I think that history is not kind to this kind of behavior especially in an art like ICM. IMO It is always about the Raga with everything else being secondary, and players will come and go and the players who hold the raga above all else are the ones we will most likely remember with the greatest fondness.

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Kirya
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Reply with quote  #2 
"Flow" - yes, if I ever had any reservations about RK it is the interruption of flow - which is precisely the area in which UVK excels. RK never had an unkind word to say to me about UVK (he knew I had studied with him) - even upbraiding me for not practicing more "he gave you a great gift!"...... I believe like many ICM virtuosos he is engaged in a certain amount of sellf-promotion and controversy can be a part of that.

I have heard the information relating to UVK and RKs father and believe it to be true but I do not see why UVK would be obligated to identify all of his inspirations/sources/teachers. RK is an absolute genius, as is UVK and without any doubt they both influenced and inspired each other. We are so lucky to have had them both.
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David Russell Watson

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I rather sympathize with him, because Vilayat Khan's gharana and fans haven't merely claimed that Vilayat was the first to come up with the idea of gayki sitar, but it's even been claimed that Rais Khan stole the concept from Vilayat (See http://archive.mid-day.com/news/2012/jan/100112-Family-feud-turns-into-cross-border-musical-war.htm )

It's fairly well known that Vilayat Khan's own father died when Vilayat was nine years old, after which time he studied under Rais' father Mohammed Khan. Read that again: Rais Khan didn't study under Vilayat's father; Vilayat studied under Rais' father. Even the Wikipedia article on Vilayat Khan used to acknowledge that fact, though nowadays mysteriously omits it (Gharana wars in cyberspace? ¦·D)

Something called bīṇkār bāj gāykī aṅg on plucked stringed instruments was already under development in Rais Khan's paternal line long before Vilayat Khan was born, and was certified for at least two generations of the Mewati gharana before Rais when Vilayat claimed it as his own. Vilayat Khan's gharana, on the other hand, doesn't claim the gayki style prior to Vilayat, who they claim was its originator.

Which is more likely, that gayki sitar sprang full-grown from Vilayat Khan's head and then was jealously copied from afar by Rais Khan, or that the idea evolved over a period of generations in the Mewati gharana and was introduced to Vilayat when he studied under Mohammed Khan of that gharana? Moreover it takes no more than listening to Rais Khan's playing to see that it is no copy of Vilayat Khan's.

Now none of this to deny that Vilayat Khan was a great musician, or that his own particular style of gayki wasn't great, and unique to him. I wouldn't even close my mind to the suggestion that Vilayat came up with his gayki style independently, that direction being rather the universal trend in ICM instrumental music after all, but to go further and call Rais Khan the copier, or worse yet a thief, is really going too far.

If I were Rais Khan, I would be annoyed by that as well.

Nevertheless it's always difficult to toot your own horn without looking like something of an ass.

David
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Reply with quote  #4 
There were many vocal influences - from wikpedia:

However, Enayat Khan died when Vilayat was only nine, so much of his education came from the rest of his family: his uncle, sitar and surbahar maestro Wahid Khan,[6] his maternal grandfather, singer Bande Hassan Khan, and his mother, Bashiran Begum, who had studied the practice procedure of his forefathers. His uncle Zinde Hassan looked after his riyaz (practice). As a boy, Vilayat wanted to be a singer; but his mother, herself from a family of vocalists, felt he had a strong responsibility to bear the family torch as a sitar maestro.[2]

So his grandfather and his mother - her entire family - were vocalists.

I pretty much lived with him in Simla. Every morning I came to his home to clean and polish his sitar. Every night we sat together, he liked to drink water and wine and we would talk. It is accurate to say that I learned as much from him during these conversations than I did during our lessons. During this entire period in Simla I never saw him play sitar - not once except to demonstrate something during a lesson either to me alone, or to me and Shujaat (he sometimes taught us together).

But every night he would sing, using the harmonium. He loved to sing, he was a frustrated singer. Is it any wonder that his style on sitar had a singing quality? This chicken and egg thing has got to end, these are two giants of the sitar and of ICM, leave it there.
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