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chrisnovice

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Reply with quote  #1 
I was intrigued by this short clip that Kirya posted recently



But I can't find any information about Rag Kaushiki. Does anybody know the arohana/avarohana to this or have any info about it?
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CarbonSitars

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Reply with quote  #2 
It is my understanding that Kaushiki is in the Bhairavi thaat, related to Malkauns. Unlike Malkauns, it includes Pa. Mr. Rajan Parrikar keeps a wonderful site that discusses many of the alternate names and variations of ragas, often along with sound clips and performances. You can find the particular page which mentions Kaushiki here: http://www.parrikar.org/hindustani/malkauns/

I hope that helps.
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chrisnovice

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks!
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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #4 
Raag Kaushiki is a magical raag for me and I was introduced to it by Nikhil Banerjee and I have several low quality audio recordings of it played by him at concerts in India. You should also listen to Kaunsi Kanada as it is very close.

Amit Roy was a student of PNB and thus his interest in this raag.

Kaushiki is very closely related to Kaunsi Kanada -- they have the same basic notes but different emphasis on critical notes and a different chalan. PNB played both these raags often -- almost always in India.

Here is something I posted a while back in the Definitive Recordings that I recommend that you listen to if you liked the like the little snippet from Amit Roy

"This is a very special and inspired performance by Nikhil Banerjee in 1977 at the Dover Lane Music Center of Raga Kaushiki -- even though not a very good audio recording quality it still comes shining through -- it would be wonderful to clean the distortion up so the power of this performance can even come through more clearly.



I had listened to pieces of it before but listened to the whole thing (90 minutes) for the first time and I am awed and amazed

This performance to my mind is an example of what happens when the Raga is more important than the player -- I now feel like I have met and touched the wandering sonic spirit called Kaushiki after listening to this.

The section from about 18 minutes to 45 minutes is especially powerful and evocative and has an amazing sense of flow -- like something invisible coming into visibility and revealing itself. "


From Ragamala in response to my post above
Quote:
Back in 2007 there was a lengthy topic in general discussions
Kaushiki / Kaunsi Kanada

which may be worth a read if you are interested in these ragas.

As an aside, regarding Nikhil Banerjee there are some 9 unpublished recordings labelled Kaushiki, and another 5 labelled Kaunsi Kanada. It is a long time since I listened to these but my notes say there is only one distinctive Kaushiki (and it wasn't the DLMC 1977 one).

This is from G
Quote:
As far as I am aware, the difference between Kaushiki and Kaunsi Kanada lies in the approach to Sa, in the aroh/avroh progression. To me, Kaunsi Kanada by virtue of its suffix (Kanada) has to go:

Code: Select all
P-(M)-> g M R S and d n R' S'

and the upward phrases center around

Code: Select all
g M d n s

- Basically Darbari with slightly different phrases.

See Ustd. Imrat Khan/Irshad Khan Kaunsi Kanada for an educational rendition on surbahar (I can repost here if you can't find it), with a ferocious yet still beautiful jor-jhalla

Kaushiki has no such 'limitations', and you can use a more Bhimpalasi-esque phrases, with less emphasis on the "g M R S" phrase e.g. S' n d p M g R, M g R S
I will have to look it up further, and will post if I find anything else.

There is a recording of ustd. Rais Khan doing "Kauns Ki Prakar", where he shows a few interesting variations of the kauns family.
As for more recordings of kaushiki, there is one of Bahadur Khan on Sarod with a really nice masitkhani vilambit gat, and there is one of annapurna devi on surbahar (though the quality is very bad)
Vocal wise I like KG's take on Kaunsi Kanada,
;
Amir Khan's 15-min clip is probably the best vocal version; http://www.mediafire.com/?xntmm5x9ska8zyt

For other nice recordings of Kaunsi Kanada (less rare than Kaushiki):
Niladri does a nice hour long piece (in his rare but ever so good forays into classical - his pilu and basant mukhari are amazing):


Rashid Khan:
<-- short version; you can find the longer version (~30 mins) online or it can be uploaded if you wish.

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Kirya
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Reply with quote  #5 
Here is more on these raags (Kaunsi Kanada, Kaushiki and Sampurna Malkauns) that I have gathered from G, Parrikar, Jeff Whittier and others on the web.

It is complicated and needs a lot of close listening and very slow and careful experimentation around key phrases. I think the Sampurna Malkauns is very clear but the other two are very subtle. I have playing Kaunsi Kanada a lot and after months of doing this, I had a day when suddenly it was very clear how Kaushiki was quite different - for me it was about the relative importance of P as a nyasa swar vs d in KK and how you handle g m R S but I am still figuring it out and will add to this thread if I come up with clear differences.

Kaunsi Kanada         Thaat-Bhairavi         Around Midnight
‘Ni Sa Ma, Ga Ma Dha Ni Sa'        
Sa' Ni Dha Ma, Pa Ma Ga Re, Ga Ma Re Sa
Vadi/Smvadi = Ma/Sa                 Sampurna - Sampurna


RP:
Quote:
The chief ploy in Kaushi Kanada is to joining of Malkauns to the Kanada kernel. The raga thus crystallized assumes a vakra build and its execution requires considerable forethought and skill.
One possible construction is outlined below:
S, (n’)d’ n’ S, (S)n g S …Malkauns
d’ n’ R, R S R (R)g R S…Darbari
d’ n’ S M, (M)g M, (S)R, S…Malkauns and Kanada
g M d n S”, (n)d, n (M)P M…Malkauns and Kanada
It must be recognized that in sankeerna ragas there are almost always some phrases that belong to no one constituent raga, and which are used to bridge two – often disparate – angas. The following composition of Ramrang is beautifully designed: tuma data deena ke.
From G in forum:
Quote:
As far as I am aware, the difference between Kaushiki and Kaunsi Kanada lies in the approach to Sa, in the aroh / avroh progression. To me, Kaunsi Kanada by virtue of its suffix (Kanada) has to go:
P-(M)-> g M R S and d n R' S'
and the upward phrases center around : g M d n s
- Basically Darbari with slightly different phrases. Kaushiki has no such 'limitations', and you can use a more Bhimpalasi-esque phrases, with less emphasis on the "g M R S" phrase e.g. S' n d p M g R, M g R S
RP:
Quote:
Ragas Pancham Malkauns | Sampoorna Malkauns | Kaushi/Kaushiki
These ragas are brought under one umbrella because they share a common foundation. The related Kaushi Kanada also shares genetic material with these forms.

As the name suggests, Pancham Malkauns comes to be when pancham is dropped into Malkauns, usually in an avarohi prayoga such as g M d P or g M d n d M P. The arohi flow retains the Malkauns contours. Amir Khan shows how. A variation of Pancham Malkauns goes by the name Sundarkauns.

In Raga Sampoorna Malkauns, both R and P are added to the Malkauns template. Again, while the arohi behavior hews to the Malkauns line, rishab and pancham primarily participate in vakra avarohi phrases. This basic idea is also embraced in ragas Kaushiki and Kaushi although the precise handling of swaras may show variation.
From Jeff Whittier:
Quote:
Kaushiki and Kaunsi Kanara have virtually the same scale, but the way the notes are approached is somewhat different. Especially in alap, the andolans (or gamaks) on each note are different. In Kaunsi Kanara, the andolans come from the Kanara rags, not necessarily Darbari which has its own unique andolans on Ga and Dha, but from say Abhogi Kanara on the note Ga and Adana (which is a Kanara rag) on Dha. It should be noted that these rags do not move in straight scale like Sampurna Malkauns, but permit certain phrases like "m-PgRRgm-“

Actually, there are 3 rags with this scale, Kaushiki, Kaunsi Kanara, and Sampurna Malkauns. Many Maihar musicians play Kaushiki, like the recording by Aashish already mentioned and most famously a bootleg of Annapurna playing it on surbahar. Sampurna Malkauns is Kaushiki-lite. Straight scale up and down, R & P added to Malkauns in descent.

Ali Akbar Khansahib's Kaunsi Kanara contains phrases like RndnRS which are totally Kanara and would not be found in Kaushiki. Also, his Kaunsi Kanara takes a few things from Bageshri Kanara, like a line which goes d-d-Pdnd- . If you change the d to D, you will see that the idea is from Bageshri and Bageshri Kanara. Also, a rag which is related to Kaunsi Kanara is Khansahib's Kaunsi Bhairavi, which contains exactly the same phrase m-PgRgPm- , done with exactly the same feelings. That phrase is sometimes used in Kaushiki, though AAK seems to use a different andolan on the final Pa in KK. Khansahib's beautiful image for Pa in Kaunsi Kanara is, "It's like the moon behind clouds, it comes out for a moment, and then it's gone.”

Kaushiki and Kaunsi Kanara both have a complicated vakra scale. In both you can go Sg-Rgm- or m-PgRRgm- or d-d-Pdnd-. Interestingly, one of the differences I'm hearing is in the last phrase. Annapurna goes d-d-Pdnd-m in Kaushiki and Ali Akbar goes d-d-PdnPm- in Kaunsi Kanara.

Definitely, Kaushiki is Malkauns-ang and Kaunsi Kanara is Kanara-ang. Annapurna holds the Ni just as one would in Malkauns and often goes d-m, and also d-m-Pm. She also uses a little g-S. The dnS in Kaushiki is clearly from Malkauns. In AAK's Kaunsi Kanara, the dnS is just as clearly from Kanara and he also use dnRS, which is absent in Kaushiki. He also use RndnRS which is not in Kaushiki. In addition the andolans of Kaushiki are definitely those of Malkauns, and the andolans of Kaunsi Kanara are definitely those of the Kanara rags, and have a similarity to Adana, Abhogi Kanara and Nayaki Kanara.

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Kirya
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Reply with quote  #6 
I just found this today

Rabi Chakrabarti plays Raga Kaunshiki on his sitar. This is a recording from All India Radio (Akashvani Kolkata) broadcast.

Here he is accompanied on the tabla by Satyabrata Chatterjee, disciple of Pandit Anindo Chatterjee.



He also comes from the Nikhil Banerjee lineage

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Kirya
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daz199

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have a couple recordings of Nikhil Banerjee playing this... email me manmeet604@gmail.com
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