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dysh

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello all.

I need your help in recalling a specific Raga which I need to use for an art project.

I don't remember the name of the Raga but I do remember the RagMala story which depicts its Rasa (Rasa allegory). It goes something along these lines:

A very old man sits on the balcony of his house. Quietlly gazing through the fields into the horizon.
Automn (or winter) Rain begins to fall signifying the change of the seasons. At once the man realises something. He realise exactly where he is in his life - very much closer to the end than to the beggining of it. A tear rolls down his face as he experiences a deep acceptance of who he is and the whole of his life up to that moment, and of death being his next big event in life. And so, he feels relieved, relaxing every tention held in his body and soul. The old man remains sitted on the belcony just as before the rain, but with a very different coviction within.

Excuse the literary freedom - this is how I remember it. I think I read it in some ICM book a long time ago.
I thought it might be Malkauns but searching the web shows allegories that are different than the above.

Help in identiying this Raga would be much appreciated,

Peace,
Dysh.

Please feel free to reply on email as well, at:
dernakinedesh@gmail.com
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pbercker

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Posts: 1,451
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "dysh"
Hello all.

I need your help in recalling a specific Raga which I need to use for an art project.

I don't remember the name of the Raga but I do remember the RagMala story which depicts its Rasa (Rasa allegory). It goes something along these lines:

A very old man sits on the balcony of his house. Quietlly gazing through the fields into the horizon.
Automn (or winter) Rain begins to fall signifying the change of the seasons. At once the man realises something. He realise exactly where he is in his life - very much closer to the end than to the beggining of it. A tear rolls down his face as he experiences a deep acceptance of who he is and the whole of his life up to that moment, and of death being his next big event in life. And so, he feels relieved, relaxing every tention held in his body and soul. The old man remains sitted on the belcony just as before the rain, but with a very different coviction within.

Excuse the literary freedom - this is how I remember it. I think I read it in some ICM book a long time ago.
I thought it might be Malkauns but searching the web shows allegories that are different than the above.

Help in identiying this Raga would be much appreciated,

Peace,
Dysh.

Please feel free to reply on email as well, at:
dernakinedesh@gmail.com
I'm not sure what raga you have in mind. However, the link below has an entire section on ragmala paintings (89 total) which may be of some help.

http://www.artoflegendindia.com/ragmala-paintings-c-1_227_248.html

Speaking just for myself, the description reminds me of how rag Marwa makes me feel (especially as played by Ustad Rais Khan). Note that in in the Raga Guide, Rag Marwa is described as follows:
Quote:
Marwa is the main raga of sunset and twilight. By continually suspending the tonic (Sa) and emphasing Re and Dha, Marwa expresses a certain feeling of anxiety and expectation. It is considered a difficult raga.
In some sense this description is consonant with your description of a man, presumably in the twilight of his years, feeling a bit anxious at what may come next.


Pascal

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chrisitar

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Reply with quote  #3 
If its any help: Megh, Malhar, and Desh are rainy season ragas. It makes me think of raga Hemant, perhaps due to the snowy winter season i'm used to here in the mid-latitudes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by "pbercker"
However, the link below has an entire section on ragmala paintings (89 total) which may be of some help.
which link? I'd like to see these

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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #4 
The depiction of the melody as a "man", and an old one at that, suggests that it's one of the six Ragas being referred to, as opposed to the Raginis or Putras, etc. The next clue is the reference to the beginning of the cold seasons. Based on these, my guess would be Raga Shree - I think it is associated with that time of the year?
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If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chrisitar"
If its any help: Megh, Malhar, and Desh are rainy season ragas. It makes me think of raga Hemant, perhaps due to the snowy winter season i'm used to here in the mid-latitudes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by "pbercker"
However, the link below has an entire section on ragmala paintings (89 total) which may be of some help.
which link? I'd like to see these
oops.... sorry about that .... here's the link....

http://www.artoflegendindia.com/ragmala-paintings-c-1_227_248.html

the entire site is devoted to the art of India. The painting section has over 17,000 paitings categorized in various ways ... religious art ... ragamala paintings ... paintings of the gods... etc.... I've not seen anything like it in terms of comprehensiveness.


Pascal

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My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
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Christianamr

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "jaan
The depiction of the melody as a "man", and an old one at that, suggests that it's one of the six Ragas being referred to, as opposed to the Raginis or Putras, etc. The next clue is the reference to the beginning of the cold seasons. Based on these, my guess would be Raga Shree - I think it is associated with that time of the year?
One year ago I tried to make a paper for myself featuring the seasons and the ragas associated with them - I consulted many sources and found to be lots of ambiguity :
Most people put Shree in late autumn ( Hemant ) season , some others in early winter ( Shishir ) and one source even puts it into early summer ( Grishma )... :?
I have very little experience listening to or playing ragas according to seasons , but it

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Ramesh

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Reply with quote  #7 
Dear Forum Members,

Salaam and Namaskar,

I also need hep in identifying a Raga and i opted to post it here since the topic is similar and i dont want to make a new thread with the same topic so as to not to flood the forum.I hope the thread starter doesnt mind.

So here are the notes of the Raga in ascending order that ive been really anxious of identifying
Sa Re ga Ma Pa da Ni Sa
It just came to me while ive been "playing" around and the "mood" just stuck me really deep inside.Honestly it felt like Classical/Sufi Persian music to me,i mean at least the mood/rasa.

I would deeply appreciate any information regarding this inquiry.Thank you very much and May God bless all f you.

Sincerely,
Ramesh

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"If in every home one child was taught Hindustani classical music this country would never have been partitioned."-Bade Ghulam Ali Khan
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Christianamr

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Posts: 464
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Ramesh"
Dear Forum Members,

Salaam and Namaskar,

I also need hep in identifying a Raga and i opted to post it here since the topic is similar and i dont want to make a new thread with the same topic so as to not to flood the forum.I hope the thread starter doesnt mind.

So here are the notes of the Raga in ascending order that ive been really anxious of identifying
Sa Re ga Ma Pa da Ni Sa
It just came to me while ive been "playing" around and the "mood" just stuck me really deep inside.Honestly it felt like Classical/Sufi Persian music to me,i mean at least the mood/rasa.

I would deeply appreciate any information regarding this inquiry.Thank you very much and May God bless all f you.

Sincerely,
Ramesh
It depends on your definition of " Ma ", because some people will take " Ma " as either komal or tivra madhyam , the other one being written " ma " .

- So in the case of tivra ma , the corresponding South Indian Melakarta is Simhendramadhyama . Oceanofragas gives 6 ragas for this parent scale , Simhendramadhyamam and Madhu Basant being the most notorious .

- In the case of komal ma , the melakarta is Kirvani . Oceanofragas gives 10 ragas for this one , the notorious one being Kirvani and some ragas in Kauns-anga .

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सहस्रनाम ततुलयम राम नाम वरानने |
Sahasranāma tat tulyam Rāma nāma Varānane .
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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #9 
I'm not exactly sure what a typical Sufi Persian scale is but given that the Kirwani mode has a scalar relationship through transposition with one of the most common and popular modes in Central and Western Asia , that is Hijaz (aka Basant Mukhari in India), perhaps it is Kirwani rather than the M# variety that is being described here?
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If there are just ''six tones'' in an octave [sic] then why have frets for tones that don't exist?
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Ramesh

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Reply with quote  #10 
Christianamr and jaan e kharabat ,

Salaam and Namaskar Dear Sirs!

Thank you so much for responding.Yes indeed i think it is Raag Kirwani!Ahhh now i can sleep peacefully! I googled about it and and im learning more about it now but i wouldnt be able to do so if you havent given me Raag's name in the first place.I honestly have no knowledge of Persian /Sufi scales and melodies,but the Tar player plays the music during Sama and in my humble attempt to replicate it at home i ended up playing the notes in the scale i mentioned which turned out to be Raag Kirwani.
I also found beautiful renditions of Ustad Ali Akbar ,Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt and Ashwini Bhide to name a few in youtube.
Again thank you very very much and May God Bless you Sirs.

your servant,
Ramesh

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"If in every home one child was taught Hindustani classical music this country would never have been partitioned."-Bade Ghulam Ali Khan
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