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Joshua Feinberg

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Reply with quote  #16 
stuti-

whether or not you play with tabla is a matter of what type of hindustani music you are playing. in the dhrupad style, tabla is not used. pakawaj is. but the alap (the section with just the main musician and the tanpura) is much longer. if you are playing modern instrumental classical music, then you need to play with tabla after the alap. in modern performance, half or 3/4 of a performance may be with tabla accompaniment.

best,

jf

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Stuti

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Reply with quote  #17 
Thanks JF That's very important information for me to know, I'm grateful.
Blessings

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sitarman

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Reply with quote  #18 
Stuti and all,
I enjoyed reading everyones posts on this, though a couple were a little too critical in my opinion. Stuti, you never once exhibited any ego or disrespect, or "Christian superiority", and showed great understanding of the various ways in which music, any music, is perceived. Yes Trippy, the cheapening of the sitar and Indian miusic in the hippy days was a real thing but it was done through ignorance and naivite, not through prejudice and disrespect. We all must come down from our learned positions enough to recognize that, sometimes, that first intro to the sound and exotic quality of the sitar and the whole new experience of Indian culture and art can be a first step into becoming a learned, respectful, and accomplished Indian musician. I understand Stuti's observation that playing this music is not a Christian thing to do, for those whose idea pf religion is closed minded and dogmatic, so he is correct in observing that it is going out on a limb from his upbringing. Obviously, if one falls in love with any music, one will become immersed in it and its tradition, and through this widened knowledge and understanding, stereotypes are broken.
Any escape from stress, daily routine, and any fixation on beauty in art and music surely can be beneficial, "healing", and Indian music has no exclusive claim to that. I truly believe that the healing and spiritual properties westerners often see in ICM is because, as something so unique in sound, and so foreign to their normal musical experience, it allows for total escape and long periods of immersion (such as a slowly developing alap) and that immersion and "escape" is beneficial just as meditation is.
I've noted before in posts that ICM is first abnd foremost music, not a tool for meditation, at least if one sees it as a musician, but most "audiences" are not performing musicians, and who are we to tell them how to enjoy their music?
Stuti, I grw up in NYC and I can't believe that you would have a hard time finding a competent, sincere teacher there. I wish I had been into ICM when I lived there rather than after I moved to Tucson, where I have had to mainly travel hundreds of miles to study. Just learn as much as you can about the proper rendition of raga , as it sounds you are apt to do, and a teacher will come along sooner or later.
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Aanaddha

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Naad
stuti-
.. if you are playing modern classical music, then you need to play with tabla after the alap. in modern performance, half or 3/4 of a performance may be with tabla accompaniment.

jf
JF,
Would you be kind enough to provide the source of your information, I'd be curious? One of my favorite recordings is of Ust. Vilayat Khan, Raag Bhairav, Alap and Jhor {India Archives 1001) - no tabla. (I'm sure there a few others of solo sitar besides this and Alif Laila's). And, if this example constitutes "a modern Indian classical performance" ?

A.

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Joshua Feinberg

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Reply with quote  #20 
hello,

my source for the information i posted is my own experience. a solo sitar recital is very, very rare. and most people would (and do) say that a raga rendition is not complete without the gat.

i did not say that performances without tabla do not exist. my own teacher has a CD called, 'Ali Akbar Khan Plays Alap'. it is only alap of two ragas, iman kalyan and shree. but performances like this hearken back to the dhrupad style, and are very rare in the modern hindustani music environment.

best,

jf

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sitarman

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Reply with quote  #21 
Have to agree with JF there. Sure there are occsassionsal solo sitar recordings, but out of 100 concerts with sitar, one or two would be an exception, certainly not the rule, so his statement that if one is going to perform a raga (paraphrasing with your permission) on sitar one should be able to perform the gat with tabla accompaniment. Now, another part of your question, Stuti, was about tampura, and quite often there is no tampura. That is completely up to the sitarist. Also, often with Indian musiucians on lower budget (not RS and Anoushka!) tours, the ability to bring tampura players may be limited. A friend of mine gets called whenever an artist needs a tampura player here in Tucson, including RS, but I'm sure many cities have no access to one. Like I said, some artists (SP comes to mind) seem to prefer the quieter, less "background ambience" performance withpout tampura.
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povster

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Reply with quote  #22 
Something to keep in mind here is that we are talking about a cd as opposed to a "performance". Yes, even studio recorded cds are, technically, "live performances", but there is a difference. In Alif's CD, it is described as "A meditative musical experience with a gradual build-up of intensity in the soothing, resonating solo sitar. " So you know what you are getting before you get it, so to speak. I consider it quite valid.

I have heard many 78RPM performances that were only solo sitar. Granted, the few minutes that a 78 will play for indeed limits the breadth of the performance. Yet they are there. And they are there because of the technology. We no longer live in the world of chamber music and no electricity, where concerts were small venues and once they were performed the only recording of them lay in the memories of the listeners. We have radio broadcasts, amplified large concert halls, LPs, cassettes and CDs (hmmm - any raga on 8-track?) and the ability to record, overtly or covertly, any performance we attend. Various media can lend themselves to new traditions. It is a natural growth.

Consider even the elder of stringed instruments: the rudra vin. It once had no frets, a single gourd and a single string. A far cry from its modern day child. As did the sitar develop to its present state.

Just some thoughts on the whole magilla.

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Aanaddha

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Stuti"
Has any other artist just performed with Sitar and Tampura? Also would the lack of a Tabla Player break any kind of rules in Indian Classical Music? Must a combination of Sitar, Tabla, and Tampura always be present when doing a performance?
Stuti,
The answers to your questions are, yes, no, and no.

A.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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Bobby

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Reply with quote  #24 
Hi there Stuti!

Interesting. Very interesting.
Ragas do heal.
Rendered properly, at the right pitch (saptak), with the true vaadis and samvaadis brought forth, and at the correct prahar (time).
Even a single swar/sur/note has immense strength.
I have been thinking of effects of particular ragas on particular ailments.
My dad, (having played sitar for 40 years now) with extensive knowledge wud probably be in a position to help. I am just a seedling trying to grow. Its just that we have to use logic.
For instance, lets take the Raga Marwa...
S r G m D N S'
With Dhaivat to be brought forward. Keeping Gandhar weak.
Not much of meend work.
Mandra (Lower) scale preferred.
This is typical Marwa.
It is a Veer Ras or, in other words, not a 'Very Soft' Raag.
What would happen if the raga is played to a patient already showing violent behaviour?

In gist, In depth study, proper technically done riyaz and application at the right time with the right raga for the right ailment WILL SURELY WORK.

All the best. God bless you for the effort
Do keep me updated about yr successes.
Any problems, We are all here to help.

Regards.
Bobby.
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #25 
Old post resurrected I know but came about it in a roundabout way and had a link to share pertaining to it regarding various Ragas and healing properties which I found interesting a little bit. http://www.geocities.ws/ilaiyaragam/musictherapy.htm

Lars

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #26 
Rythm sells - any gigueing musician will tell you that. "It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing. Doo Wop Doo Wop Doo Wop Doo Wop Doo Wop Doo Wop Doo Wop Doo Wop ". Wether it be head banging, AC-DC, Fusion, Punk, whatever, those toes just gotta tap. Nearly every sitar/tabla performance will get a thunderous audience response when the tabla player fires off a two minute rela volley. On live sitar gigues, alap is shortened just to keep the audience from going out for a smoke. Seen it many times in India. One recording of sitar sans tabla that stands out is "Ravi Shankar Live in San Francisco". Raga Malkauns. That's another of those required listening titles. You won't be dissappointed. Healing properties - of course ! ! ! Any number of Indian instrumentalists and vocalists can calm the beast. So can Pat Methany, Curved Air, Richard Burmer, The Cars, - so many. Meow x 3 ! ! !
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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Lars"
Old post resurrected I know but came about it in a roundabout way and had a link to share pertaining to it regarding various Ragas and healing properties which I found interesting a little bit. http://www.geocities.ws/ilaiyaragam/musictherapy.htm

Lars
Too bad there's no raag for annoying flashing pop-ups.... :roll:

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Let's hope 2016 is less violent and that people discover the soothing influence of ICM. Hari OM!
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #28 
No sound yoga or history buffs here I take it, tough crowd! Well, ran into an unanswered question and I had some info is all. Looked like a little contentious subject and I remember the original poster well, another one having been run off over the years unable to absorb from the many experts I suppose :roll:

Lars

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povster

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "OM
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Lars"
Old post resurrected I know but came about it in a roundabout way and had a link to share pertaining to it regarding various Ragas and healing properties which I found interesting a little bit. http://www.geocities.ws/ilaiyaragam/musictherapy.htm

Lars
Too bad there's no raag for annoying flashing pop-ups.... :roll:
Marwa may fill the bill there!

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mayer141

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Aanaddha"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Stuti"
Has any other artist just performed with Sitar and Tampura? Also would the lack of a Tabla Player break any kind of rules in Indian Classical Music? Must a combination of Sitar, Tabla, and Tampura always be present when doing a performance?
Stuti,
The answers to your questions are, yes, no, and no.

A.
I suggest ditching the tabla player and pocketing his/her fee.
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