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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #1 
Wondering if any of you guys have any pictures you can post showing a jawari in need of work, in detail...strange request, but sometimes it is difficult looking at my instrument knowing whether the slight grooves under the strings...barely there...are worth worrying about yet. Haven't noticed sound issues I think, but because its happening so gradually, I might not.

I guess it'd be interesting to see what a jawari looks like when an experienced player would look at it and say, yes, that jawari needs some work, etc.
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mayer141

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Nic,

Any sign of a groove and I sand it down straight away. I tend to 'tweak' my Jiwari every few weeks. I wish I had a pic of a worn down one but I keep my sitars in check!!!!!

J
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #3 
I will bet you that your Jawari is just fine.
If it is only slight grooves then you are OK.
Try putting some pencil graphite on the bridge under the string.
Make sure to make it a long triangle so that the graphite goes under where a string grinds up the bridge on Meend.

I used to obsess over my Jawari, but have learned to chill.
Next time you have a chance to get a jawari worked on, have them cut a couple of extra slots for your Ma string.
This way you can use one slot for practice, one slot for performance, and still have one slot left over just in case.

You can also put a thin sheet of plastic/film under the string when you are doing repetitive exercises.
This keeps the Jawari nice and clean for when you really want to play.

By the way, what is your bridge made of?
Bone, ebony, delrin?
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #4 
Pretty sure its bone. I use the graphite trick, and I've done a very slight amount of very fine sanding (basically took the graphite off, but minimal bone). It still sounds good to me....actually my jor string is starting to worry me (sounds much more open all of a sudden!).

Once I eventually get another sitar I'll be a little more confident with more aggressive jawari work, but when you just have the one, knowing that you could potentially make an instrument unplayable makes you a bit more timid with the files! Wouldn't mind if I had a backup sitar, at least.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #5 
You already have a backup/travel sitar.
What you need now is a nice traditional sitar. 8)

Joking aside, I was definitely less worried about my jawari when I had a few sitars hanging around.
If you only have one sitar, you are one accident away from being unable to practice.
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chrisnovice

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Reply with quote  #6 
I learned to my cost that it is a very bad thing to be over confident about doing your own jawari! Resulting in a replacement bridge and a trip over to Trippy Nick's!

As and when you really do need to take out the grooves do it v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y, a little at a time and get the strings back on to check it after every few strokes. Once you've lost the sound it is very difficult to get it back again. Or so I found. I thought I understood the theory, I quickly discovered I didn't!

Thanks again Nick, by the way. 8)

Chris.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #7 
Yes, your Jawari is not a toy.
It takes a great deal of experience to do a beautiful Jawari.
I say buy a cheap sitar that you dont care about, along with several bridges, and practice.
Get a good sense of how to do a decent jawari before you ever mess with your good playing instrument.
Without a good jawari, even the most excellent sitar will sound like a pile of crap.
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