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sitarjunky

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello all

such a good thing to have this forum out there.

a question to you all sitar knowledgable people:

What can you do when the peg holes of the tarab strings get to wide/big ?

this is realy disturbing cause some of the pegs are starting to break on though to the other side, meaning they are on the verge of interrupting the movement of the left hend - scratching it on fast passages and such.

plus its unesthetic to have the pegs alligned in different hights.

does anyone know of some material you could paste on the pegs or in the holes to make them thiker? maybe some saw dust mixed with wood glue or maybe taping sand paper ?

thanks much.

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haldamos

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Reply with quote  #2 
It happens as you play more and tune frequently. If you don't want to get a new set of pegs, just sand down the "nub" that peeks through on the bottom. I wouldn't mess with the hole itself, as eventually, you may have to replace the pegs anyway. Its kind of a badge of honor to have low lying pegs...shows its wearing with use!
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haldamos

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Reply with quote  #3 
Oh, I forgot to mention that it is proabably not the hole, but the peg that is getting worn...sitarfixer will probably have a better idea.

h

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sitarjunky

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Reply with quote  #4 
a badge of honor you say. in that case i feel very honored.

I do hope its the pegs that are getting smaller and not the holes getting bigger. thats probably the case sinse my sitar is teak (i think) and the pegs are made of...not teak?

in case ill end up changing them any idea for a specific type of pegs (good wood, good looking and dark brown to match sitar)?

by the way im from israel where no one has even heard of that thing called sitar. so for me this forum is one of the best things that has happened to me sitar wise in a while.

cheers.

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Surbaharplayer

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Reply with quote  #5 
Several years ago I saw sitarbuilder Kartar Hari Chand use a trick by rolling a small piece of sandpaper around the part of the peg that contacts the neck. This prevents the peg from slipping and moving inwards. The rough side of the sandpaper has to be in contact with the peg...not the sitar.

Remco
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Stephen

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Reply with quote  #6 
First thing to consider is if you may be pushing the peg in too much. You might try variations on what remco put to you. Perhaps bond some kind of wood filler on the peg (since you can replace it) and reshape to fit. Really, you should only be pushing the pegs in just enough to grip. Do not push them in with the attitude that they will stay in tune for a week, or until the next climate change. Think of it more like, I'm going to be retuning this particular peg several times today, so just enough to hold it that long. This is true not only with pegs but also on water faucet valves and the little valves on a jeweler's torch. Just tighten until you meet resistance. I find that it is best to tune just beyond the correct tune and then back down to the correct tuning.
Good luck.
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coyootie

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Reply with quote  #7 
an alarming high % of all sitars including those made by otherwise good builders have lousy fitting pegs. If you are handy you can probably scrape them to fit better but if they were done badly to begin with it is futile to try to line them up very evenly as you will probably have them cut way too far down in the pursuit of symmetry. I am just redoing two fine precious old sitars with all- new hard rosewood pegs. The proper way to take care of enlarged pegholes is to 'bush' the openings and rebore them, then refit the pegs, but unless you are a skilled woodworker you are probably better off letting a professional do this. If you can fit all new pegs and do it really well, it is another solution, much easier than bushing all the pegholes, but you have to find pegs that have thick enough shafts to seat well after scraping/filing/sanding 'em to fit your pegholes.
You are guaranteed to make it worse trying to build up the peg shafts with Bondo or sawdust/glue mixes.
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #8 
One reason pegs are an ongoing problem is the wood on the neck itself. A tapered peg shaft pushing into the hole is going to meet less resistance across the grain as compared to the end grain. Result - an oval shaped hole with the higher apogee across the grain. If you still have sufficient peg shaft length, Wrap the sandpaper around the peg shaft, (this time with the grit outside) and use it as a bore hole reamer. Be ever so easy here!!! With the hole a little rounder now, the peg should hold better without so much pushing in as before. On trimming the peg shaft tips - with the peg inserted, mark with a pencil where on the shaft, the neck surface meets the shaft. Remove peg and cut just inboard of that pencil line. Sand clean and you're set. DO NOT do this job with the peg still in the neck. I've seen far to many necks with saw marks around the tip holes. "Idiots"! If you can thin down the remaining pegs to get a matching lineup of war torn veterans, all the better. Replacement pegs may be the ultimate way to go, depending on just how much or how low those little guys are standing up. Dark rosewood pegs are the first choice. Harder wood and as such, usually more cleanly cut on the lathe. The good stalwarts on the "Western Front", (contributing vendors on the left of your compootuh screen) can probably supply you with pegs. Otherwise, eMail me directly on my website and I can set you up with some good pegs as well. Play on!
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festus

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have had to use a Cello peg shaver and reamer at times when the taper wasn't there to begin with. But be very,very carefully and put tape on the peg marking how far and no farther you'll go throughout the process to be exact. You're only fine tuning here or you're making expensive toothpicks.

And then trimming the end of the peg as Sitarfixer has explained.

Once you fine tune your peg to this spot - mark your peg (slight chisel impression or magic marker) on the shaft where you can't see it from the outside with little ///// as to it's string position on the neck. You'll always know the string/neck position for that peg.
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sitarjunky

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Reply with quote  #10 
well thank you all

some good advices and thougts in here.

i think ill opt for the pegs replacing first (if this pegg ordeal will get worse), and if that doesnt help ill try all the shaving, sanpapering, hamering, sawing, and all that.

cheers.

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