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hbajpai

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Reply with quote  #1 
Benares and Lukhnow/Poorab back to back!

I am not sure if the original recording as such. I have an inkling that someone took two independent recordings and stitched them together. I would like to be wrong.

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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "hbajpai"
Benares and Lukhnow/Poorab back to back!

I am not sure if the original recording as such. I have an inkling that someone took two independent recordings and stitched them together. I would like to be wrong.


That's exactly what's been done - perhaps as a compare and contrast exercise, the result being that it's nearly impossible to distinguish the Benares style from the Lucknow style, being so intimately related (indeed, according to D. Courtney in "Focus on the Kaidas of Tabla", there are scholars who reject recognizing the Benares gharana as a distinct entity because "this gharana has not developed a unique technique nor repertoire". Courtney himself advocates recognizing the Benares Gharana for historical reasons).


In any case, I have this recording of Ustad Shaik Dawood. It's approximately the first 10 minutes of the second track of DRUMS OF INDIA - Ustad Shaik Dawood (put out by sa-re-ga-ma/RPG) which actually completes that performance; another peshkar follows this, but sounds like it's from another performance altogether. Regretably the sound on my CD is only marginally better (if at all) than the youtube version. There appears to be extremely few recordings of Shaik Dawood. What I wonder about is whether or not David Courtney might have some unpublished recordings since he studied for a great many years (someone should ask him!).

sidenote: D. Courtney's book - on kindle - "An American in Hyderabad: Life in India in the 1970s" is a short but engaging read - Chapter 8 is entitled "Shaik Dawood" - it's quite clear that David was very fond of his "very good and kind teacher" who apparently had a widespread reputation for being a good teacher in part because of his generosity and willingness to share his tabla knowledge which, D. Courtney writes was widely acknowledged to be extensive.

As D. Courtney notes, in his time this was a fairly unique quality by contrast to the older secretive tradition of the old gharana system. He writes
Quote:
Dawood sahib and his generation bridged the old feudal approach to tabla and the modern, urban approach.

Courtney, David (2012-11-25). An American in Hyderabad: Life in India in the 1970s (p. 43). . Kindle Edition.
As the old feudal system along with what he calls the "Kotha culture" ( "kothas" being the great mansions of a class of educated wealthy elites where "mehfils" - or house concerts - were held) was slowly expiring and no longer the patrons of music and culture, Ustad Shaik Dawood apparently easily made the transition. Courtney writes that Dawood
was able to free himself from the fetters of the old feudal mindset.

__________________
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
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