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Shivadhyanam

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Posts: 157
Reply with quote  #1 
This is very nice Paran I love playing. It is a very good practice for more advanced Parans that have similar sequence of bols (at least the first three lines). Dhas and Ta's are played on the sur and the na in the tihai is a ne. Don't hold back on the power and see if you can play up to 150/155 bpm or double that depending on your lehara speed preferences. Enjoy.

Dhage  Tete   Tage      Tete   Dhage   Tete     Tage     Tete
KreDha Tete   Dhage   Tete   KreDha  Tete    Dhage   Tete
KreDha Tete   KreDha  Tete   KreDha Tete     Dhage  Tete
Dhet     Dhet  Terakita Dhet  Dhete    Dhete  Dhage  Tete
Dhet     Dhet  Tagen    -na    Dha       --        Dhet    Dhet 
Tagen    - na   Dha      --      Dhet      Dhet    Tagen   -na
Dha x
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dhatitdha

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Posts: 95
Reply with quote  #2 
Wonderful Paran, thanks for sharing.

I have translated it in my software and posted on my site.
You can play it with different scales and tempo, please check this link

http://vishwamohini.com/music/music.php?id=674
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Shivadhyanam

Senior Member
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Posts: 157
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for creating that extended version of the Paran. Yes, this Paran will cover three cycles if one plays it at around 310bpm (which is the tempo I like for drut). If one plays at 155bpm, for example, with one matra covering four strokes i.e dhagetete, then the whole composition will cover 1 1/2 cycles and so the need adjust the tihai as you did to fill two cycles. One could still play the original Paran (at 150bpm) if one starts on the the ninth beat though.

Here's another similar Paran. Similar in the sense that it will cover three tintal cycles if one matra covers two strokes, making a total of 48 matras.  if you decide to cover one matra with four strokes then the Paran will have 24 matras and you will need to start at the half cycle.


Dhage  Tete   Dhage    Tete    Tage      Tete     Tage     Tete
KreDha Tete   Dhage   Tete     Gadi      Gana    Nage    Tete
Kete     TeTa   Gena     Dhage  Tete      Kate     Gadin   Gena
Dha-     --       --          --        Kete     TeTa     Gena     Dhage 
Tete      Kate  Gadin    Gena    Dha-      --        --          --  

Kete     TeTa   Gena     Dhage  Tete      Kate     Gadin   Gena
Dha x

I hardly play this Paran because of a tricky part (at least at high speed). Nothing impossible to overcome really. Just a matter of careful practice. The part is: Gadi  Gana  Nage    Tete   Kete  TeTa   Gena  Dhage  Tete  Kate  Gadin Gena Dha- 

1) The na in Gana/Gena is a ne.

2) Looking at the composition and thinking about it now, I think that perhaps every Tete should be played reversed. I usually play the normal way and perhaps that is what causes me a bit of problem when trying to play the composition at high speed. Specially the "Kete TeTa" where the Ta is a kinar stroke. What do you guys think?

3) The way I overcome tricky phrases is by taking individual parts of a composition and play them over and over and over starting at a reasonable slow speed and then slowly increasing it by say 20 beats at a time. Imagine that I want to play the above composition at 310 bpm but the phrase (I mention above) is causing a lot of trouble. First I would set the metronome (lehra machine) at 155 bpm and do a few repetitions. Then I would increase it by 20 beats and so on till I get to a point (usually half way) where my technique starts to fall completely apart. I then know where I need to do more precise work and perhaps even stay there for months working on it (which can translate to years just to play a bandish at the desired speed and clarity). As I get better I start to increase the speed by 10 beats, 5 or even less if the phrase is very very tricky. I do this kind of work mostly with Gats as find them to be the most troublesome.

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