INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
pbercker

Registered:
Posts: 1,451
Reply with quote  #1 
I normally don't cross-post, but this is also posted in the tabla forum because of the interest in Ishaan Ghosh (just 13 years old!) and his extraordinary mature style of tabla playing (which may be of interest here as well) but folks here will be more interested in Pt. Nayan Ghosh I suspect (especially the second one, which is actually the middle portion of the first video) ...

Pandit Nayan Ghosh with his son and child prodigy Ishaan Ghosh - Raga Patdeep

The OLD (shorter) video seems to have been removed ... this is a LONGER version (90 minutes) of that video:

Rag Patdeep ...



Pandit Nayan Ghosh with his son and child prodigy Ishaan Ghosh - Raga Tilak Shyam (this one is actually extracted from the full video above):
Quote:
Published on Jul 9, 2013
Pandit Nayan Ghosh, the son of Padmabhushan Pandit Nikhil Ghosh, performs raga Tilak Shyam, as a tribute to the late Pandit Ravi Shankar. Nayan, who usually plays in a style that is part Ustad Vilayat Khan and part Pandit Nikhil Bannerjee, plays Tilak Shyam in a style that pays homage to Pandit Ravi Shankar. The brilliant tabla accompaniment is provided by his 13 year old son, Ishaan Ghosh.


(both are very high quality HD 1080p videos).

So, the 90 mn video = Rag patdeep + rag Tilak Shyam + Rag Piloo (starting at about 1 hour into the first video). I think he concludes with some folk songs at the end but I'm not sure (maybe someone can clarify).



Pascal

__________________
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
0
chrisitar

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 487
Reply with quote  #2 
I've always wondered; are the children of professional musicians with a long family tradition really child prodigies or have they just been brought up in it and trained since infancy? Or is there no difference?
__________________
Meend over matter
0
ahirbhairav

Registered:
Posts: 165
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chrisitar"
I've always wondered; are the children of professional musicians with a long family tradition really child prodigies or have they just been brought up in it and trained since infancy? Or is there no difference?
Depends on whether they have interest in music or not. I think.

__________________
Next concert: Aditya Sharma (today)
Sandipan Samajpati (9/28)
Shubhendra Rao (10/19)
Rakesh & Friends (Gino Banks, the drummer, tweeted me that they'll be in Oct, so whenever they come here, if they come here.)
Zakir Hussain & company (3/23/14)
0
nicneufeld

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,564
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chrisitar"
I've always wondered; are the children of professional musicians with a long family tradition really child prodigies or have they just been brought up in it and trained since infancy? Or is there no difference?
To be a bit hyperanalytical for a moment, first look at the/a definition of prodigy:
1. a person, esp. a child or young person, having extraordinary talent or ability

Most of these young children of great musicians fit that bill at least...they end up being extraordinary in their abilities, at least for their age. I think the point you may be getting at is it may have more to do with the fact that their parents, cultural expectations, surroundings etc all prime them and push them to develop those abilities, than any innate, instinctive or genetic factor. If Ali Akbar Khan had been the son of a rubber merchant or Vilayat Khan been the son of a local government functionary, one wonders if they would have become the titans of music that they ultimately did.

So I guess my statement would be, the two aren't mutually exclusive. The fact that they are child prodigies stems, IMHO, almost entirely from the fact that they have been brought up in it and trained since infancy. I think we just sometimes think of a "prodigy" as having some other unique internal talent that is what sets them apart, and I'm not sure that's always the case. In the family of a master teacher I should imagine just being receptive to teaching and hard-working is more important than any other virtue for developing such skill.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.