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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #61 
p
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chris thill

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Reply with quote  #62 
An excellent comment, to be sure ! Ah, there really is nothing like British humor...
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coughcapkittykat

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Reply with quote  #63 
What does everyone think about this?
#at=13

He's apparently been playing for over 15 years but I'm not sure you can tell...
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yussef ali k

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Reply with quote  #64 
Hi all. Allow me to get in (humm...somewhat late). so the 'prayer' goes:

Thank You JHendrix for bringing up sounds the electric wasn't even supposed to make (purists were cringing at the time - good publicity for him): he was out of tune sometimes but then the Floyd Rose was yet to come;

Thank you Sex Pistols/Ramones for giving me 1 more reason to listen/study jazz (after Tangerine Dream & the like ...): they made waves partly because of the big-name criticism (& as JRamone told GP mag
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #65 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "trippy
These silly arses on Youtube etc want a different sound &, because they're a little or not so little retarded mentally/musically, they don't really know what to do with it. :wink:
Hey, some people find it offensive to use terms like "mental sitardation"! :twisted:

OK, I've exhausted my pun quota for the month.

Western audiences are notoriously easy to please if you play sitar. That's part of the problem. Imagine if in India all you had to do is play "Mary Had a Little Lamb" on the trumpet, squawkily, with all the skill of a 4th grader, and you were revered as some sort of master of the Western classical music by Indians. Not suggesting the Indians are so ignorant, but your average American is thoroughly ignorant of what ICM is, and this warm reception of such bad playing is part of why people are so happy to upload videos of themselves abusing the ol' instrument. I've done some audio recording of myself, but at least with the caveat of trying to get some painful yet constructive feedback on my playing, in absence of a local teacher.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #66 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chris
The guy looks like a heavy metal guitarist whose guitar was replaced with a sitar while he was looking away
This reads like a setup for a Niladri Kumar punchline!
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nikhilwannabee

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Reply with quote  #67 
I am one of these amateur players, not much posted on Youtube though, but yes, when I play for people here in the midwest they are rapt, very forgiving (not knowing what to expect after all), and enthusiastic, respectful, supportive and nice. Would that there were some sitar masters around here to show me the right way to play that thang, haha. Over the past 5 years I have gone from solo to adding guitar, viola, and percussion, with a crystal bowl thrown in for good measure! One of my good friends, a very successful business guy gives this advice, "Sometimes you have to be your own Guru". And you can't let others expectations stop from from trying to achieve your goals. I cringe when I hear so much music, live or otherwise, and very often those Youtube sitar 'masters' can be ESPECIALLY TERRIBLE, so I guess I do have standards after all. But I still listen to lots of them, and have been exposed to much great music through that venue. I say, keep on postin', the more sitar the better.
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theprosperone

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Reply with quote  #68 
NikhilWannabe, did you say you were in Champaign, IL? If so, Indrajit Banerjee comes through there from time to time and teaches. He is a wonderful player and teacher. Even just a few lessons with him could make a world of difference. Also his Dvds are wonderful. Don't forget how many great sitar players offer skype lessons now. There are options out there that could at least help you get started on a good foundation to build off of! That is if you're interested because I completely understand folks who want to teach themselves and just mess about on the instrument. This is something I had to get used to years and years ago as a guitar player. I PLAY the guitar, like spent hours and hours a day years on end wood-shedding my guitar skills. It was a little frustrating to get out in the real world only to hear every Tom, Dick, Harry, Steve and Ray-Ray confess how they're dedicated guitar players who've played for years. Then you find out they have difficulty tuning their instrument, can't even make a bar chord and definitely can't tell the difference between modes and scales. :roll: :evil: ops: In the end, we all have to realize the world is full of individuals with goals of varying degrees. Not everyone wants to be a Pandit or Ustad just like every child doesn't want to be a doctor or lawyer. Its up to everyone to find their own path and ride it out till the end. I realize every time I start to get caught up in what others are doing, I'm letting my own responsibilities fall by the wayside.

There comes a point in any learning situation where it goes from being a hobby or just an interest to becoming a passion and dedicated study. I think a lot of folks highly underestimate how demanding some folks practice regime is. I know I don't put nearly enough time into sitar right now with the whole world constantly tugging me in 100 different directions. Luckily I built up my guitar chops from the age of 13 to 20, before I had any real responsibilities to distract me! :wink: I've been feeling the tug of sitar begging and pleading with me to quit my job, quit my life and just find a space where I can simply be and practice my instrument daily for hours on end. Its hard to pull 4 hours of Riyaz after 8 hours of work, cooking dinner, running errands and so on. But somehow, I'll find a way or else this passion to learn and move forward will drive me completely insane.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #69 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "theprosperone"
Luckily I built up my guitar chops from the age of 13 to 20, before I had any real responsibilities to distract me! :wink:
This is not an advantage to be underestimated! If I hadn't done the same I would probably never have gotten very far on the guitar.

+1 on Indrajit Banerjee, the DVDs are a pretty rich resource.
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #70 
Indrajit will be in Chicago the weekend of the 30th I think, I'll do a post on it once confirmed.

Lars

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nikhilwannabee

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Reply with quote  #71 
Hi theprosperone, thanks for the Indrajit info, I do have 2 of his most excellent videos, each with years worth of insight for a beginner. I live in Bloomington, IN., not a mecca for sitar masters, sadly. I have some physical handicaps which prevent me from traveling much, and also lots of projects and responsibilities here, so it may be a while before I hear some real sitar players out in the world. I did pass that point of flirtation with sitar some years ago, but rather than complete obsession, I settle for discipline (2-3 hours a day) and devotion (24-7) for this wonderful, sublime instrument. In order to 'spread the word', I play out once a month or so, and have made 3 recordings over the past 5 years with my group of talented musician friends. Alot of joy let me tell you! In order to get the overall sound working with the western instruments, tuning and scale adjustments have been made. I did grow my little pinky nail out so I could reach under and pluck the sympathetics, a soothing and hypnotic effect. I know I am risking ridicule here, but our current set list includes folk songs, nursery rhymes, some old hymns , some western classical melodies, that Japanese koto song 'Sakura', themes from some old TV show's (for example the 'Star Trek' theme sounds GREAT on sitar!), Bollywood 'funk', and small excerpts incorrectly played of Rag Bhimpalasi, Darbari and Multani. I would say this is a kind of musical collage that is accessible for the average mid-western listener, fun to play, and sometimes very beautiful and exotic with that special transcendental sitar magic. That is my story, ICM or not, and I'm sticking to it.
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