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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #1 
It is listed as a Vipanchi Vina.
Odd little thing.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Bengal-Bengali-India-Long-Handled-Vipanchi-Vina-19th-c-/220776657482?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item336750724a#ht_616wt_907


There is also a Showtica VIna (?)

http://cgi.ebay.com/Bengal-Bengali-Long-Handled-Lute-Showktica-Vina-19th-c-/220776649944?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item33675054d8#ht_653wt_907
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #2 
I am surprised that no one thought these to be comment worthy.
I am always fascinated to see odd instruments I have not seen before.

I think the one with the tiny tiny body is so odd.
Why would you make an instrument with no resonance chamber.
I would think that this instrument would barely make a sound.
I guess the neck would be hollow so there might be some noise.

The other one with the two chamber body is odd too.
Maybe that is just a way of utilizing a double chamber gourd they had available in the area this instrument comes from.

Anyhoo, just thought they were interesting.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #3 
I should say, I looked at both of those and was interested! Should have commented earlier!

The first one is interesting...is that a bridge BEFORE the jawari bridge? That is confusing! What is that item, and if a bridge, why have a jawari bridge instead of just a tailpiece?

Also, that first one has some very strikingly beautiful tuners. Very unique. Prone to breakage possibly but with a very elegant look. If I were a maker I'd consider turning something similar in ebony for a unique instrument, perhaps.

Perhaps the lack of a resonator would indicate these are cheap, simple instruments designed chiefly for learning? The 19th century equivalent to "practice pads" for drummers...won't make much noise, quite cheap, but good enough for practicing for veena or sitar? Sheer conjecture on my part I admit.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #4 
Well really old sitars had much smaller bodies than our do today.
I know they used Ostrich eggs for the body of some instruments back then.
Here is an older style sitar with small body.
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/89.4.1586

I think the one on ebay has a sea shell as a body.
An odd choice for sure.

Maybe someone like Tony K will have some knowledge for us.
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David Russell Watson

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Reply with quote  #5 
What is that thing on the vipanchi vina projecting from the soundboard on the top half of the gourd? It looks something like a non-javari type bridge, but there are already slots on the javari bridge for all five strings. Moreover it seems to be obstructing the path of most of the strings!

David
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #6 
Maybe the raised bridge is from another instrument and was mistakenly put on this one.
It could have come from a bowed instrument.
Of course it could be the other way around.
Maybe this is a bowed instrument and the Jawari bridge is from another instrument.
Maybe the odd shape of the body is to make bowing easy.

But then again I am just pulling this idea from my a$$.
Maybe someone will drop some knowledge on us.
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