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Sillofthedoor

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Reply with quote  #16 
Thanks cwroyds,

I concur with most of this, the sound is thinner and a larger tabli would probably be at least part of the answer. Wasseem made one for a guy on facebook, Peter Morin, don't know if he is on here, its the sister of this one and built after, it has a larger tabli and I'd bet it is the better sitar for it (really nice heart shaped grain on the wood of his too...).

I have though got quite a nice growl on my low Pa string so am hoping to get that on the low Sa as well which at the mo' sounds a bit pussy. I also lowered the tuning to C# and promtly lost alot of the jalwari quality so am having a go at that, it is quieter and definitely loses some of the range of sound. \As you said sustain is good which is fun. I am enjoying playing it.

My dandi is full size, no compromise there. and I find its sits slightly lower but not so much as to annoy when playing I guess I just adjust.

This design is a bit squarer in the body which does sit better on the foot, more stable than the shahidali I still have, which is more rounded. It is still less stable though, than a proper one, but I find that if I take extra care positioning myself to start with its ok (usually I don't and have to stop and do so).

I do suspect it will mike easier at least in loud situations, and there is EQ etc. but there is a trade off on the sound, yes. Although I like mine more than I thought I would I would always prefer full acoustic , but this is a very good compromise for me...If it wasn't for the ease of travel i wouldn't consider one, but actually I am pleased I took the plunge..For fusion I wouldn't hesitate, I haven't doner alot of that but i don't even like subjecting my acoustic sitar to the high noise levels that on many sound stages are standard.

I would have liked to experiment with a hole at the top of the dandi as in the recent antique look shahidali that was posted here, but wasn't brave enough to try and tackle it...
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CheesecakeTomek

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Reply with quote  #17 
I too have a shahidali travel and concur with everything said so far. I ended up taking off the kharaj because the small body just can't do much with it, at least for my ears. It was also a bit close to the chikaris. The Pa works great, though. Interested about the idea of going a size thicker for Ma, I feel like that should add some degree of depth to the sound. Heading to California tomorrow (from NY) and looking forward to bringing this instrument with me. It will be the third time I am flying with it and this is exactly why I bought it. Zero stress flying and I have something to keep my fingers going while I am away from my two full-size sitars.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #18 
Reading back my last post it sounded like I was poo-poo-ing travel sitars, when I should have just been celebrating your beautiful instrument.
For that I apologize.
I do however like your travel sitar and think it looks very cool looking.

I do think these have to be tuned to D though.
C# would be much too loose on mine.
It is a bit slack at D.

As for the Kharaj string, I still like having access to that really low Sa, and my Kharaj sounds quite nice after a good jawari.
It sustains very well and the meend range is like on a surbahar for that string.
On my Shahidali, he gave me the choice of a Low Sa, or a High Pa.
A case could definitely be made for the high Pa, as I find myself missing that element in the chickari.
There are only six tuning pegs, and I don't think there is room for an extra string anyway without the strings getting too close together.
Although you could just run the three chikari strings very close together so the Sa Kharaj has enough room.
Raviji left off the high Pa on his sitars, and i miss it every time.
I think it looses something delicate and nice without it.
I think a Sa is stronger when in the presence of a Pa in the chikari.

The best part about a travel sitar is that I don't worry about it as much as my regular sitar, so I have no fear of flying with it, or just taking it with me in the car.
I feel it is pretty rugged and can take care of itself.
The case I got is fiberglass and pretty good protection, even if it has to be gate checked.
I just don't have to worry about it.
After taking my Hiren Roy with me on several trips, I do not miss the stress.
Those were some of the most stressful travel experiences.
It is like traveling with a super rare Bird egg.
One mistake and you have a shattered gourd.
The travel sitar solves this problem quite nicely.

Here are some pictures of my Shahid Ali.
It is a pretty much straight classic look, but I like it that way.
Really nice woods
https://www.flickr.com/photos/carletonroyds/sets/72157638815180946/
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #19 
C
LOVELY sitar, like a new looking antique, if you know what I mean!!!
They DO seem to want to go to D too. Mine does. Of course it's GP tuned & actually sounds very good without 'plugging in'. You said....

There are only six tuning pegs, and I don't think there is room for an extra string anyway without the strings getting too close together.>

Agreed so maybe we can all get together & have them make a 'real' 7 stringer, why not. Is there a good reason why they don't??
You are SOOO right about travelling with a super sitar like an HR/ You can imagine ME opening all these sitars recently & going SH++++++++T when one's had its gourd broken.

Nick
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Sillofthedoor

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Reply with quote  #20 
No problem cwroyds,

I think its a useful debate for anyone thinking of buying one.

I think you are probably right about the tuning to D.

Mine is 7 string, the strings are a little close together but playable. I am going to change the spacing slighly to improve this too. I am hopeful that I can get a better sound out of the base string, it feels like a jalwari issue to me, A few years back I took too much off the back part of a jalwari leaving a reletavely short "flat" part and the base went wild reverberating on it, will try that here.
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barend

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "cwroyds"
I think the only way to do a travel sitar in the future is to make the tabli full size.
......

The problem with the sitar lacking acoustically is that even if you put a pickup on it, the electrified sound will be lacking too.
An instrument with a pickup is only as good as the acoustic sounds the pickup picks up…
Thanks for your post. You just convinced me not to buy a travel sitar. I my previous post I had three point of doubt which are all three confirmed by you.

The main thing is the sound. You are right if you put a pickup on it it will still sound only as good (if you are very lucky) as the acoustic sound. At least not better. Also the sitting position and balance worried me which you also confirmed.

A travel sitar with a full body won't be a travel sitar for me anymore. It will just be a normal sitar with only other tuning mechanisms. That's not enough advantage over a normal sitar. What would be nice is to have solid body sitar which feels and balances like a normal sitar but with no feedback, good acoustic sound, easy to carry around and tuning stability. But that's an utopia for now.
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Sillofthedoor

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
The best part about a travel sitar is that I don't worry about it as much as my regular sitar, so I have no fear of flying with it, or just taking it with me in the car.
I feel it is pretty rugged and can take care of itself.
The case I got is fiberglass and pretty good protection, even if it has to be gate checked.
I just don't have to worry about it.
After taking my Hiren Roy with me on several trips, I do not miss the stress.
Those were some of the most stressful travel experiences.
It is like traveling with a super rare Bird egg.
One mistake and you have a shattered gourd.
The travel sitar solves this problem quite nicely.
Amen to that. Its the real reason for having one.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #23 
The shorter scale is a blessing and a curse depending on the circumstances. Makes it a lot easier to wrench up to D if you need to (generally, to play with western instruments, which rarely hang out in C# where most full size sitars are comfortable). And my old travel sitar is now serving my Ustad, who uses it when giving lessons at least, because given some health issues it is easier for him to play, longer...the shorter scale lessens the string tension for him, without having to tune way down. Were it not being so useful, I would miss it from time to time...but even when I had both, I was only playing my full size sitar, which just sounded a bit better to me. Then again it had an exceptional setup and a delrin bridge, so maybe that's why!

I might get another one someday. I definitely thought highly of the instrument. Loved the mechanical tuners and ease of transport.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #24 
Barend,

Don't get scared off buying a Travel sitar.
They actually serve a purpose, and if I did not have mine I would buy another.
In fact I plan on buying another in the future, but I will have them make it with my specifications that would include a full size tabli.

I believe you are incorrect when you say that a full sized tabli would make the travel sitar not a travel sitar anymore.
The tabli only need to be a few inches wider, and a bit longer, for it to sit correctly in relation to your hands.
The fact that it has a shallow wooden back is the main "Travel Sitar" requirement.
It won't break. That is the key.
I would throw this travel sitar under a plane without worry as it is a solid nugget of wood.
In a fiberglass case you are pretty safe traveling with it.

My suggestion is to get a good maker to make you a travel sitar with a full size tabli.
Also I would add the Pa tuning peg to the little chikari bracket, and I would run it over the chikari post with the lower sa chickari.
That way the low Sa string won't have anything above it, making it much easier to play.
Even with the full sized tabli it might not match up to the full size sitar, but at least it would be a rugged travel companion that you could practice on.

Here are a couple of photos showing how much smaller the travel sitar is in terms of Mass. WIthout the gourd it becomes a MUCH smaller item to carry around, even if it did have a full sized tabli.
Get yourself a travel sitar.
You will appreciate it, even if it does not hold a candle to your regular sitar.

Attached Images
jpeg sitar2.jpg (104.73 KB, 4 views)
jpeg sitarcase1.jpg (38.36 KB, 3 views)

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Sillofthedoor

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
My suggestion is to get a good maker to make you a travel sitar with a full size tabli.
Also I would add the Pa tuning peg to the little chikari bracket, and I would run it over the chikari post with the lower sa chickari.
That way the low Sa string won't have anything above it, making it much easier to play.
This is good stuff. as I wrote earlier, Peter Morin who is on facebook got the next sitar designed like mine from Waseem and he asked for a larger tabli, it still fits into a case under 120cms, which is a standard musicians unions are fighting for to be included in overhead luggage, some airlines allow that other it goes in the hold.

What i do not know is how much better the sound is but why not contact him fb:

https://www.facebook.com/peter.morin.73?fref=ts

He is friendly, doesn't bite strangers.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #26 
I will also say that even if they don't allow you to take the sitar on board a plane, you can always gate check it.
You take it out to the gate, you hand it to someone who hand carries it down to the plane, and at the other end you wait just outside the door of the plane and they bring it to you.
They do this with things like baby strollers all the time to it is not weird.
The key is not to let the sitar be taken at the ticket counter.
If it has to go through the complex airport baggage system there is ample opportunity for the sitar to be smashed beyond repair, even a travel sitar in fiberglass case.

If you gate check though, there is very little chance of the instrument being damaged.
Just a thought.
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bikerundertaker

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Reply with quote  #27 
1901991_624895337604548_5633312285188775793_n.jpg You are correct I do not bite strangers! I have the second wonderful black wood design travel sitar made by Waseem Sitarmaker. I am extremely pleased with the quality and tone. Waseem has a great eye for design and his attention to detail, his quality & workmanship is superb. I am so pleased with Waseem's craftsmanship and quailty, he is making a surbahar in the black wood design for me, I wanted something totally different! Waseem keeps me involved in the progress, the design, sends photos regularly. I will be flying to California on July 11th and taking my travel sitar with me on it's maiden voyage! I will keep you posted!
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barend

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Reply with quote  #28 
Looks really nice! I have send you a PM
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Sillofthedoor

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Reply with quote  #29 
Hi pete, nice to see you here!
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bikerundertaker

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Reply with quote  #30 
1969401_624894897604592_3281433296607703757_n.jpg Finally made it on Chandrakantha! Due to severe Thunderstorms and a hurricane off the coast ,we lost phone & internet since Thursday 7/3/14 and it won't be fixed until next week. I will check in when I am able.
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