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fossesitar

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Reply with quote  #16 
Private Label !! Bourbon or Scotch ?? Anyway, marvelous way to bring this thread to a well-deserved conclusion !! To whatever extent your definition applies to me, aplogies to all and sundry. One never sees ones own shortcomings does one? VA-VA-VOOM !!
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povster

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "yehuda1983"
Hello everyone
I am fairly new to playing Sitar.
my main problem is my left Index finger.
i cannot play for a long time because it hurts and i get cuts also.

Is there a solution for that? other than keep playing until it goes numb.

Thank you very much
Hi yehuda! As often happens on message boards things took a few turns. But getting back on track.

It will take time to develop the callouses to a point they are tough enough to allow more extended practice sessions. I would suggest practicing until it starts to hurt but NOT cut. Take a break for a little bit. My teacher showed me a neat trick when I was starting. He lit a match, let it burn down some, then blew it out. He then put the two fingers over the burnt out match to let the heat penetrate. That would give me a little extra playing time before the pain set in again.

Also you can briskly rub your fingertips across a rug, generating heat from the friction.

These are just stopgaps to get in a few more minutes.

It is better, in my opinion, to reduce the length of your practice sessions in the beginning. Better to have four 15 minute sessions or six 10 minute sessions, for example, than a single hour session. Over time, as the callous really starts to develop, you will be able to increase the duration of each session.

If you HAVE slit the finger, by all means use a bandaid to cover it. It won't help your callous development but you can still get in good practice while the cut heals.

The thing is that the whole callous thing is worst at the beginning. Over time, as you play more and more, the callouses can shift to the tip of the fingers, meaning it is time to "cut a new groove" by intentionally playing a little below the current groove. Nice thing is the callous tends to spread as it develops, and that new groove will probably be within the periphery of the existing callous. Much less troublesome than starting off with uncalloused fingers.

Lettuce know how things go!

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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #18 
What a strange turn in this thread!! Right now what's hampering me with my finger isn't the callouses but a slightly infected/swollen cut on the side of the index finger by the first joint. Hurts to bend the thing. Wasn't being careful when cooking. Ouch! But callouses do come so take heart.

On the music store in India thing, an important consideration is that there are huge differences between classical music and popular music in both India and the West. Hence, you could go to dozens of "music stores" in the States and find nothing but guitars, basses, keyboards and drums, nary a clarinet or viola in sight. But then there are stores that cater to that. In India most of your popular music uses Western style electric instruments still, so if the music store caters to popular, that's what I'd expect, and if classical, then classical style instruments.

Not that I've been over there, just making a comparison to the US. Classical music lives on in both cultures, just not on the same scale as popular music.

Yikes, 30 min til MY lesson....better get off here and prep.
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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nicneufeld"
On the music store in India thing.................
In India most of your popular music uses Western style electric instruments still, so if the music store caters to popular, that's what I'd expect, and if classical, then classical style instruments.

Not that I've been over there, just making a comparison to the US. Classical music lives on in both cultures, just
You're right, India isn't stuck in some time warp , a relic of hippy dreams, it is alive and thronged with young talented peole who want to do really personal things with that most personal instrument, the guitar :wink:

Check this out, for example.

http://www.saptaswara.in/cms/6/Our-Showrrom.htm

Warning - Greg, you might need the tranquillisers after seeing this.
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #20 
fossesitar
Sorry if I seemed a bit harsh but I have the greatest respect for those who have put in their time. I didn't want to make you feel I was throwing 'daggers' at you which is why I said about it not sounding like 'you', if that makes sense. We all know of your sterling work in 'forwarding' ICM!!! 8)
And just who was that stuff from 'private label aimed at??? Name yourself!!!!

Some may remember how I slagged off Niladri Kumar's playing from an ICM pov when he played at the Sankat Mochan Temple Concerts in Varanasi last year but how I still felt it was entertaining from an audience's pov.
POV
Great reply as expected!

Nick
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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "trippy
fossesitar
Sorry if I seemed a bit harsh but I have the greatest respect for those who have put in their time. I didn't want to make you feel I was throwing 'daggers' at you which is why I said about it not sounding like 'you', if that makes sense. We all know of your sterling work in 'forwarding' ICM!!! 8)
And just who was that stuff from 'private label aimed at??? Name yourself!!!!
I'm not sure an apology is need (for once :twisted: ) from you.

In this context the statement that
"Many of the greatest musicians on the planet are and/or have been entirely self-taught. " though deserves more scrutiny especially but not only within an ICM context. If that isn't deserving of a challenge I don't know what is. Sounds on the outer limits of contention, as well as fantasy to me.

I used to think that I could continue my studies of ICM self-taught. I soon realised my self-delusion, at least if I was hoping to achieve anything beyond able to busk on the streets or play to restaurant audiences.

Anyway, my tuppence worth, from one sufferer of narcissus syndrome to another
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plectum

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Reply with quote  #22 
Todi and multani share the same swars, that's it. There are significant differences in their chalans. How someone can try playing multani, end up playing todi, but still sound awesome beats me (with the former being late evening and the latter being early morning ragas and all that). And this is a wonderful message to send out to someone who has started to learn HCM. I mean, raags like Ramkali and bhairab, bilaskhani and bhairabi, shree and gouri are close, so forget the difference and just stick to learning one raag and "move the spirit", dramatically reduces the amount of learning needed.

I hope I did not offend anyone. Om Nmah Sivay!!!!!!!!!!

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You know, music, art - these are not just little decorations to make life prettier. They're very deep necessities which people cannot live without. ~~ Pablo Picasso
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tilaka

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Reply with quote  #23 
Can anybody please explain how to do the dra bol? Namaskar to all teachers I met, nobody explained, nor I asked yet ops:
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povster

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "tilaka"
Can anybody please explain how to do the dra bol? Namaskar to all teachers I met, nobody explained, nor I asked yet ops:
Dra is similar to diri. Diri is simpy a da and a ra played double time. Hence, playing the da ra stroke combination takes the same amount of time as playing a single da or a single ra in any given tempo.

Dra is like that but the accenting and timing of the two strokes is different. Difficult to put it into words.

Assume you are playing at a fixed tempo, one da and one ra per beat. Diri would be one da and one ra twice as fast in the same one beat. The speed and accent is evenly divided between the da and the ra.

In dra, you still have a da and a ra stroke taking up the same one beat of time.But the accenting is different. The da is played a little faster and the downward ra is played with a little stronger accent. You could conceive of the effect by thinking of one beat being broken out into, say, three counts. The first count is occupied by the fast da stroke, This is followed by a more strongly accented ra stoke that lingers for the remaining 2/3 of a beat. It could be pronounced as dRA due to the emphasis on the ra stroke.

This 2/3 beat thing is more conceptual but hopefully it gets the point across.

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chefothefuture

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "povster"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "tilaka"
Can anybody please explain how to do the dra bol? Namaskar to all teachers I met, nobody explained, nor I asked yet ops:
Dra is similar to diri. Diri is simpy a da and a ra played double time. Hence, playing the da ra stroke combination takes the same amount of time as playing a single da or a single ra in any given tempo.

Dra is like that but the accenting and timing of the two strokes is different. Difficult to put it into words.

Assume you are playing at a fixed tempo, one da and one ra per beat. Diri would be one da and one ra twice as fast in the same one beat. The speed and accent is evenly divided between the da and the ra.

In dra, you still have a da and a ra stroke taking up the same one beat of time.But the accenting is different. The da is played a little faster and the downward ra is played with a little stronger accent. You could conceive of the effect by thinking of one beat being broken out into, say, three counts. The first count is occupied by the fast da stroke, This is followed by a more strongly accented ra stoke that lingers for the remaining 2/3 of a beat. It could be pronounced as dRA due to the emphasis on the ra stroke.

This 2/3 beat thing is more conceptual but hopefully it gets the point across.
To a western ear would it be likened to: de-Dum as in- Dum,de-Dum dum ? (Wasn't that from some cop show like Dragnet?)
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povster

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chefothefuture"
To a western ear would it be likened to: de-Dum as in- Dum,de-Dum dum ? (Wasn't that from some cop show like Dragnet?)
An interesting observation. I suppose one COULD liken it to the deDUM. Yes, Dragnet...A Mark VII Production!

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tilaka

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Reply with quote  #27 
thanx to everybody for attention yes, I can hear how does it sound, I'd like to know about the technique, how do get the right impact, does the whole hand moves downward or more opens? Does anybody uses two mizrabs?
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povster

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Reply with quote  #28 
The whiole hand should open/close for good da, ra, diri and daRa strokes. Almost like closing the hand to make a fist and thn almost fully opening it. Thee is more strength and control than just use one or two fingers.

I use one mizrab on sitar. Two on rudra vin with my little finger for chikaris.

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Dasani - the official bottled water of ICM
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