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srimugunthan

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Reply with quote  #1 
What exactly is the mughul/persian influence on hindustani classical music?

When speaking about differences between hindustani vs carnatic, people say that hindustani evolved organically due mughul rule in the north. What exactly was the influence and how does it differ from carnatic music?

(I have also asked this question in quora-forum, but couldn't get any answers, so re-posting here)
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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "srimugunthan"
What exactly is the mughul/persian influence on hindustani classical music?

When speaking about differences between hindustani vs carnatic, people say that hindustani evolved organically due mughul rule in the north. What exactly was the influence and how does it differ from carnatic music?

(I have also asked this question in quora-forum, but couldn't get any answers, so re-posting here)
A good place to start might be right here .... David Courtney has several pages on the history of ICM ...

http://chandrakantha.com/articles/indian_music/objective.html

Wikipedia also several articles ... for example ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindustani_classical_music

But while wikipedia is generally reliable, this is not always the case. For example, from the wiki article above ...
Quote:
The most influential musician of the Delhi Sultanate period was Amir Khusrau (1253–1325), sometimes called the father of modern Hindustani classical music.[4] A composer in Persian, Turkish, Arabic, as well as Braj Bhasha, he is credited with systematizing many aspects of Hindustani music, and also introducing several ragas such as Yaman Kalyan, Zeelaf and Sarpada. He created the qawwali genre, which fuses Persian melody and beat on a dhrupad like structure. A number of instruments (such as the sitar and tabla) were also introduced in his time.
But if you read Courtney's article, you'll then recognize this for the exaggeration that it is. Personally, I would start with Courtney's various pages because he has a scholarly approach and his information is considered to be very reliable. It's worth perusing his "works cited" page to get a feel for what his sources are ...

http://chandrakantha.com/articles/indian_music/works_cited.html



Pascal

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jaan e kharabat

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Reply with quote  #3 
The most obvious influences are in instrumentation. Some of the famous musical instruments of the sub-continent, such as sitar, sarod, perhaps even the tampura, are modified, "Indianised" forms based on such instruments as tambur, dotar, rubab, etc. The playing techniques of these instruments have also carried over in many instances, which are quite distinct from how "purely aboriginal" Indian instruments were/are played; e.g. sitar vs veena.

Then there is the language and nomenclature of Indian music, which like the languages of India in general, borrowed substantially from Persian and Arabic.

I think the music of Asia west of India has had much less influence on aesthetics of Indian music than is sometimes made out. Though some ragas and taals have Perso-Arabic names, the melodies and rhythms of India are very much Indian in spirit and form, and set apart from anywhere else.

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