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chrisitar

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Almost every North Indian classical instrument has a "dhrupad version" that can play the lower octaves/slower alap like surbahar for sitar, sursringar for sarod, vichitra veena for slide guitar, etc. Why isn't there a big 'dhrupad sarangi' meant for playing low octaves?
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martin spaink

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Ha! You're right, I thought the same thing and at some point I modified my sarangi, I like the lower regsiters and wanted to get below karaj. I modified the hardware to have a longer karaj and tune it to anumandra pancham. You can see pics here:
http://imageshack.us/user/martinspaink
otherwise, on nicholas magriel's site you can see Hanuman Mishra with a giant sarangi! No idea what that kingsize axe can do, but it's bound to be lower as it is reaching over the top of his head when sitting in a playing position.
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stringtester

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Because the sarangi is so close to the khyal and thumri vocalstyle there are not so much
need of lower tones then low Sa.
But in the book "Pillars of Hindustani music" by B.R.Deodhar some vocalist talked aboute
a need of a bigger sarangi. Probably because the ordinary sarangi has it
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chrisitar

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Perhaps the 'sursagar' was an attempt at this? A very rare instrument indeed, I've only heard it once in an old 1940's video clip. Maybe it could achieve the lower octaves? I wonder why there are no players of this instrument.
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peeceebee

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Reply with quote  #5 
The sursagar apparently had a very demanding technique, requiring both plucking and more normal sarangi-style fingering from the left hand. There were apparently only a few of them made, by it's inventor and mostly members of his family. Apparently bundu khan could play one, but of course was known for his sarangi playing.

A classical sarangi is demanding enough in technique, and gives a very beautiful and full expression of musical quality- and even it lags way behind in interest among players of Indian instruments...
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martin spaink

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Also, with a good bit od added stringlength, it gets that much more difficult to play good sounding meends. I pity those who want to play Dhrupad on a cello because of this burden of larger distances of the fixed points in meends and gamakas! It means more hard work!
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chrisitar

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Reply with quote  #7 
Like this?


I knew a guy in St Louis who invented a double bass with sympathetics; the Bazantar:

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