INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
chrisound

Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #1 
How should I tune a 10 sympathetic string Sitar?
Any good exercises for a learner?
0
chefothefuture

Registered:
Posts: 205
Reply with quote  #2 
There are a number of tunings for your Taraf strings.
It can depend greatly on how the sitar resonates, and the Raga and That(mode)
that you are wanting to play.
Starting with the lowest string and Sa being C# next to middle C (Ni),
You might try-
S,N,S,R,G,G,M,P,D,n(one octave up from mid C), I like to double Ga for some reason...

That's also assuming that you know how to transpose notation... I'm getting lazy LOL!

There are some "tuning charts" available at Raincitymusic.com. LOts of excellent videos as well.

And, it has a topic of discussion, but the exercises and lessons in Ravi-ji's book are a good place to start.
0
mayer141

Registered:
Posts: 202
Reply with quote  #3 
I change the tuning of the TT's depending on the rag. For something like Hement, Rageshri, Aboghi etc...I double the Ma otherwise (like Chefofthefuture) I double the Ga.
Another option is to tune them to a straight run, so starting with top Ga all the way down to Sa. Guess it depends on the instrument and where the 'sweet spot' is.
Is it a Kharaj sitar? That could change the tuning as doubling Ga on a kharaj instrument can give you that extra resonance.

J
0
trippy monkey

Registered:
Posts: 4,281
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi
'We' Etawah lot seem to tune our lowest string to the NI or Dha if no Ni in the raag. We then use the back chikaris & meending to bring in the SA as the first main starting note. Check out any 'gayaki' style sitarist &, maybe, others too.

If your sitar has a kind of 'dead spot' where the sitar sounds a bit 'thump' rather than 'ding' then you could always tune TWO taraf at that point. It seems most sitars have this around GA, MA or PA. I know some of mine do. Trying to retune AROUND this is good too.

Nick
0
chrisound

Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #5 
It is a radha krishna sharma
0
Lars

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,452
Reply with quote  #6 
You're probably not looking into Ragas as yet, I'd suggest just a major scale to start with a little variation like SNSRGMPDNS or CBCDEFGABC from low to high. Keep it simple while you learn to get around on the instrument and tune.
Someone had posted this link awhile back which looks really helpful: http://www.thesitarproject.co.uk/
Also as had been mentioned the Ravi Shankar book is quite good also, where you see sympathetic tunings for 13 strings you can drop any double notes perhaps to equal 10.


Lars
Rain City Music

__________________
http://www.raincitymusic.com
0
nicneufeld

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,564
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Lars"
You're probably not looking into Ragas as yet, I'd suggest just a major scale to start with a little variation like SNSRGMPDNS or CBCDEFGABC from low to high. Keep it simple while you learn to get around on the instrument and tune.
+1. I have a 13 string taraf but I do basically the above with a few strategically added doublings with the extra strings (and sometimes I take it up to Re' on the high strings). But starting with the above, in a very major scale/bilawal thaat sound, is a good starting point, because then its very easy to shift very slightly for other ragas. For instance, Yaman is a frequent first raga to learn, and all you'd have to do is raise the Ma a half step (making it Lydian mode, or kalyan thaat). Need to do something in khammaj, just flat the Ni strings. But for getting started, just get the thing in tune with itself and a basic major scale as shown above and you should be fine.
0
chrisound

Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks fellas. I figured as much about not doubling the strings. I was delving into music theory last night and noted that there are 7 swaras but 13 notes in a scale and this numerical difference made me want to post this question.
0
chrisound

Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #9 
From what I have learned thus far, it seems that doubling notes is the point to make with sympathetic tuning. The additional notes after you tune to the raga are or seem to be the player's choice as long as it is in line with the "scale"
0
nicneufeld

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,564
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chrisound"
I was delving into music theory last night and noted that there are 7 swaras but 13 notes in a scale and this numerical difference made me want to post this question.
There are seven swaras, in the sense of the solfege / sargam...the ubiquitous Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th in Western thinking, or do re mi fa so la ti, not that many people actually use the solfege in the West, outside of that blasted Julie Andrews tune.

That said, there are alternate versions of five of the seven...the 2nd (re), 3rd (ga), 6th (dha), and 7th (ni) can be natural (shuddh) or flatted (komal), and the 4th (ma) can be natural (shuddh) or sharped (tivra). Sa and Pa are fixed. So in any octave, not counting the octave of the same Sa note, you have the possibility of 12 notes, exactly like a Western chromatic scale. Carnatic music may get a little more complex with a theoretical potential of 22 swaras, but I'm ignorant in that, and am sticking to North Indian! Enough for me to learn there!

The raga can use either a few notes (several pentatonic ragas such as durga and bhupali use only five, meaning there will be a lot of string doubling on the taraf), the common 7 note raags, where using octaves and doubling notes will fill out the rest of your notes, and there are some ragas that use almost or actually all of the various notes. I think Pilu uses a pretty broad set of swaras, including at least komal and shuddh Ga and komal and shuddh Ni.

But sympathetic tuning is pretty flexible...it depends on the raga, the instrument (how many available strings are there), and the players preferences (some gharanas seem to have different customs on this).
0
chefothefuture

Registered:
Posts: 205
Reply with quote  #11 
Incidentally, Pt. Nayan Ghosh's RKS has about the most lively tarafs I have ever heard....
0
chefothefuture

Registered:
Posts: 205
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nicneufeld"

That said, there are alternate versions of five of the seven...the 2nd (re), 3rd (ga), 6th (dha), and 7th (ni) can be natural (shuddh) or flatted (komal), and the 4th (ma) can be natural (shuddh) or sharped (tivra). Sa and Pa are fixed. So in any octave, not counting the octave of the same Sa note, you have the possibility of 12 notes, exactly like a Western chromatic scale. Carnatic music may get a little more complex with a theoretical potential of 22 swaras, but I'm ignorant in that, and am sticking to North Indian! Enough for me to learn there!
Wouldn't all them 22 notes be "Shrutis"?
0
nicneufeld

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,564
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chefothefuture"
Wouldn't all them 22 notes be "Shrutis"?
LOL! Yes...umm...my mistake! ops:

Re Pt Nayan Ghosh's sitar, thanks...I had no idea that was the maker, I couldn't see a high res enough image to read the nameplate from pics of the concert. It was a particularly nice sounding sitar, just shimmering and alive sounding.
0
chefothefuture

Registered:
Posts: 205
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nicneufeld"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "chefothefuture"
Wouldn't all them 22 notes be "Shrutis"?
LOL! Yes...umm...my mistake! ops:

Re Pt Nayan Ghosh's sitar, thanks...I had no idea that was the maker, I couldn't see a high res enough image to read the nameplate from pics of the concert. It was a particularly nice sounding sitar, just shimmering and alive sounding.
Even more alive since he had the jawari replaced. It is more closed than when I had lessons with him last October. At that time it was way more open. He said that after that tour, the sitar got broken in two and while that was getting repaired, he had the old bone jawari replaced.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.