INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
pfintucson

Registered:
Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #16 
I have to agree with nic... it varies and should vary, just as in alap, otherwise why have the extra string in the first place- you're not fretting it
0
barend

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,225
Reply with quote  #17 
I like it when they play this arpeggiated SGP open string chords sometimes in alap. Or other open string stuff which is possible with the Ga string, like open string raga fragments. Don't like too much Ga string in Jhala. Sometimes it is too much and distracting.
0
nicneufeld

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,564
Reply with quote  #18 
On some raags it gets set to SSPP, no Ga...I'm thinking UVK's classic Darbari. Some raags seem to benefit more from a Ga chikari than others. A komal Ga chikari in Darbari sounds "too much" to me, when I try it, but Yaman sounds so rich with it. And I do use less (ie., shorter strokes) in the actual jhalla...chikari in alap is where I like the full sound of the triad.

Sometimes in a more improvised jhalla I will increase the number of baj strokes as intensity builds, ie., going from Dxxx to DxDx, and from there to DRDR where each Ra stroke hits all the chikaris, then cooling off back to Dxxx. Makes for loud, exciting taan-like runs. But those are improvised bits of playing that are beyond what I've been formally taught!
0
barend

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,225
Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nicneufeld"
But those are improvised bits of playing that are beyond what I've been formally taught!
That is where the fun and real music starts!
0
barend

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,225
Reply with quote  #20 
I have been experimenting with this hybrid tuning lately after playing KP tuning for many years. I dropped off my Kharaj and replaced it with a ga string. I like the little arpeggio and chordal effect you can get that SP is using a lot. And still you have the low Pa. Also some nice effects can be made with by hooking the ga string which is not common (but so what...).

What gauge do you use for the ga string? I think most people use the same gauge as the main string. But when tuning to C# I feel this string is a bit too loose especially when tuned to komal ga.

And are there any well known sitar players that use this hybrid string setup?
0
mahadev

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 425
Reply with quote  #21 
NB only used the 4 th chikari for a very short time. He was told by a senior musician, whom he much respected, not to mix up the two major styles. At least thats what I heard.
It is also possible that he decided the 4th chikari was just one string too many.
Btw, his hook was not on a fret. It was on the piece of decoration connecting the fretboard with the tabli. Cant remember what notes that hookup produced, I am quite happy with the usual hook.

__________________
http://maxflury.com/
0
barend

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,225
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "mahadev"
NB only used the 4 th chikari for a very short time. He was told by a senior musician, whom he much respected, not to mix up the two major styles. At least thats what I heard.
It is also possible that he decided the 4th chikari was just one string too many.
From NB's standpoint I can imagine this since he belonged to a gharana. Personally I never understood why different styles can't be mixed. I don't belong to any gharana or tradition and I take what I like from whatever style. I think many modern day sitar players to this. Shahid Parvez, Vilayat Khan or Ravi Shankar, Nikhil Banerjee I all like them equally. For example I always have played with a KP sitar but with a GP taraf tuning because I like the Da, Ni left hand pinky taraf strumming.

I think 8 strings is too many because the strings are too close together to control each separate string as in the typical GP chordal effects.

The Ma, Sa, low Pa, Ga, Pa, Sa, Sa" tuning has some advantages of both styles.
0
barend

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,225
Reply with quote  #23 
after playing with the hybrid tuning for some days I decided to put my kharaj back on and drop the ga string. I miss the kharaj too much. I like the ga string and some of the chordal effects that can be achieved with it but somehow I find it distracting for the raga mood sometimes. I doesn't fit with all all ragas and even in the ones that it fits like Yaman, Kirwani or Charukesi it is too dominant for me, hard to describe.

Are there any players (here or elsewhere) who use both style sitars and switch between them?
0
fossesitar

Registered:
Posts: 983
Reply with quote  #24 
RE: GA string in GP tuning, Kharaj for alap, etc.

Although I sometimes love the GA string when others are playing, even when it is featured prominently, for myself I have almost always found it overpowering although that sometimes depends or the rag or my mood. Nor do I like the practice of avoiding the GA since to me the whole idea of GP tuning is to get a very full sound from the drones/chikaris and fully exploit the rhythmic capabilities of the sitar.

A long time ago when I was in India studying under VK I began tuning the GA to PA, so I would have two PAs on the GP sitar (MA, SA, PA, PA, SA, high SA) and to my surprise VK never made any abjection to this whatsoever so it has remained my tuning to this day. It gives a very full sound with no need to avoid any strings and so it encourages a very sweeping and relaxed right hand technique.......

I must admit I deeply love kharaj for the alap but as UVK always said to me "that is what the surbahar is for". But I have continued to imagine an instrument with deep kharaj capability without the penalty entailed by hooking strings, thin "chikari only" sound during jhala, or muddy buzzy kharaj blaring during faster portions of the rendition.

I am finally building such an instrument - it uses a combination of traditional GP stringing along with advanced electronics (a hex PU on the SA drone only, going to an octaver) to achieve deep kharaj when desired, and avoid it entirely during all other portions. I am about a month away from completion and will update as or when I can. GF
0
yussef ali k

Registered:
Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #25 
Hi, all.
Although this involves personal taste/ear, 2 suggestions:

1. Overpowered Ga string: use gauge #2 (instead of #3);

2. Hybrid tuning: use Kharaj in place of the Low Pa(=take this one off) & keep the 4th cik Ga in the kharaj slot. I prefer it like this.

& have fun,
Y.
0
mayer141

Registered:
Posts: 202
Reply with quote  #26 
GP sitars (if playing Yaman, Bupali, Jhinjoti etc...) have the third in it's tuning and so implies the harmonic triad. I actually quite like it! but......it can cause problems with intonation between equal and natural temperament. A western ear would tune Ga slightly high then it should be due to equal temperament.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.