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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #16 
Greg
Yes I did & that's obviously why I'll be down soon, to collect it.
I'll post pics when I've sorted it out.
Thanks for the pics. I remember it now. The one I got is VERY similar to yours.

Nick
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Greg

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Reply with quote  #17 
looking forward to those pics...
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DreamingPanther

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Reply with quote  #18 
I thought I might reply on this one... I had the same issue and believe I've solved it.

You have a simple wood screw biting into soft tun wood, resulting in a wobbly connection that quickly strips out, right? You notice it's loose and thinking the key to getting good vibration transfer from the upper tumba is having the yoke screwed down tight, but tightening it only strips it further, leaving a looser connection.

So one day while reflecting on the idea that such a beautiful instrument is made with such basic carpenters tools (hand drills, rasps, etc.) I decided to apply a simple carpentry fix to solve this problem forever on mine. Basically... it's a hole in a very thin wall. A carpenter would solve this with a wall anchor.

I measured the hole using a drill bit to get the right diameter and went down to the hardware store for a plastic wall expansion anchor like the yellow one here: http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/inffastener/i/plastic1.jpg

Because I measured the exact size of the existing hole it required no further drilling, I just pushed it into the hole, put an appropriate sized screw in, and tighened my tumba yoke on. It's rock solid, and the sound transfers to the tumba just like it's supposed to. It's a permanent, virtually invisible fix.

After all, the screws themselves don't matter to the sound quality, it's whether they can get purchase on the back of the neck to draw the yoke up tight.

Hope this helps someone... I've gotten so much help on here I thought it time to take a turn.

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #19 
First of all, I must compliment you on that delightful moniker of yours. Next - the use of "mollies" to fix the stripped bracket holes is absolutely brilliant :!: :!: :!: It's so beautifully simple, elegant and totally effective. I've got a repair job here right now with this condition. A little touch with a needle file and the "mollies" will just drop right in. I will dish out the inside surface of the bracket just a bit to allow clearance for the raised plastic collar - ain't no thang. Thank you for this superb bit of engineering innovation. Now I won't have to carve a new replacement bracket.
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DreamingPanther

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Reply with quote  #20 
I've gotten so much help as a lurker on this forum that it's nice to hand in a tip myself. It is head slappingly simple and strong isn't it? Thank you for reminding me that a year ago when I did this fix I meant to come back and dish out the underside of the yoke with a larger drill bit so it would fully seat and hide the repair completely. The vibration transfer is great even without it though. It was kind of an emergency repair I meant to go back and finish up later, then got involved in riyaz then kids then wife then dinner then bedtime then... well here it is a year later and this post reminded me of it ha ha.

As for the moniker, thank you. It's an homage to my beautiful city of Fort Worth TX - also known as "The Panther City." Sleeping panthers figure prominently in the architecture here, and since around 2006 I've used "The Dreaming Panthers" as a collective for my one-man-band recording efforts as a singer/songwriter. And now, it seems as a dreaming sitarist.

Fort Worth got her nickname from a colorful newspaper story in 1875. This site (not mine) explains it very well, and there are lots of sleeping panther photos there... http://home.earthlink.net/~sleepingpanther/fortworthpanthers/index.html

I'm sure for this one tip I'll have a thousand questions... not many sitarists around these parts and if it weren't for iTabla on the iPhone I'd be relying on bouncing tumbleweeds to count out a teentaal...

Peace ~ Wade

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #21 
I love historical footnotes like the Ft. Worth / panther story. Thank you ! I'm looking at that panther sculpture and thinking something along that line could find its way on an all black sitar. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm ! ! !
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povster

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Sitarfixer"
I love historical footnotes like the Ft. Worth / panther story. Thank you ! I'm looking at that panther sculpture and thinking something along that line could find its way on an all black sitar. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm ! ! !
I wonder how a mongoose vs cobra would work?

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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "DreamingPanther"
I've gotten so much help as a lurker on this forum that it's nice to hand in a tip myself.
When you hand in a tip to sitarfixer that's saying something!! 8)
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DreamingPanther

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Reply with quote  #24 
Heh... a Bagheera model... that sounds purrfect.
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